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Lord Raiden
2003-11-04, 21:52
Well, since the other thread is gone and I found this thread to be useful, let's fill it up again. Can you Please list the word (phenetic or plain text) and its meaning in Japanese? Things like "I'm sorry" and "Thank you". I know it will be helpful to many as it was very helpful to me. :) Thanks again everyone.

Kensuke
2003-11-05, 02:38
Here is some...

Arigatou = Thank you
Gomen nasai = I'm sorry
Sumimasen = Excuse me
Tadaima = I'm home
Okaerinasai = Welcome back
Shimatta = Damn it!
Ryoukai = Roger!
Doushita = What's wrong?
Daijoubu = All right, I'm fine.
Daijoubu desu ka = Are you OK?
Betsuni = Nothing
Sugoi = Amazing
Masaka = No way!
Moshi moshi = Hello (answering phone)

Sakura-chan
2003-11-05, 03:10
Konnichiwa = Hello
Sayonara = So long
Itte irashai = have a safe trip
Suteki = wonderful
Oyasumi / oyasumi nasai = Good night
Itadakimasu = said before eating, not sure how to translate it
Kakkoii = "cool"
Kawaii = cute
Kowai = scary
Abunai = be careful
Yoshi = all right
Hayaku = hurry
Matte = wait
Yahari/ yappari = I thought so
Hai / ee = yes
Iie = no
Betsu ni = nothing
Mochiron = sure
EDIT :
Ohayou /ohayou gozaimasu = good morning
Konbanwa = good evening

K_R
2003-11-05, 03:22
Sumimasen also means "I'm sorry" and "thank you"

gravitation
2003-11-05, 04:31
and you can add "kudasai" to some of those words to make them in to please ______ like matte kudasai = wait please ^_^

hobobaggins
2003-11-05, 14:35
mendokusei na? how troublesome
anata wa suki desu! I like you
ecchi pervert
hentai super pervert?


and i cant beleive this has not been posted before
baka=idiot
neko=cat
inu=dog
kaze=wind
kizu=cut/scratch
suki (ski!!!)=like
kirai= dont like

Kyuven
2003-11-05, 15:53
and you can add "kudasai" to some of those words to make them in to please ______ like matte kudasai = wait please ^_^
Ku-ra-sa-i
not kudasai

squonjon
2003-11-05, 16:03
Ku-ra-sa-i
not kudasai
下さい 【ください, kudasai】
please (kana only), (with te-form verb) please do for me

Kyuven
2003-11-05, 16:19
Ah crap, you're right, sowwy...
after looking over my homework...
i see one of my translations: "ga-n-ba-tsu-te ku-da-sa-i" (hang it there)
romanizing phonetically is hard!
"Konnichiwa" is incorrect btw, it's "ko-n-ni-chi-ha" I'M SURE OF IT
on the same note, it's "ko-n-ba-n-ha" for good evening

gravitation
2003-11-05, 16:34
your correct it is "ha" but its pronounced "wa"...wa is a partical and looks like this in hiragana : http://www.uploadit.org/files2/051103-ssgadgdg.JPGbut when wa is put in a word they use the "ha" symbol for some reason...i think thats rite

squonjon
2003-11-05, 18:10
gravitation's right - the particle "wa", denoting the subject of a phrase, is written with the hiragana "ha", but still pronounced "wa".
similarly, the particle "e", meaning "to", is written with the hiragana for "he". for no good reason.

konnichiwa, 今日は【こんにちは】& konbanwa, 今晩は【こんばんは】, are made from kanji for "now" and "day"/"evening", followed by the particle "wa"; literally meaning "this day/evening..." as the subject of a non-existent sentence.

so, in conclusion, it's written "ha", but you say it "wa".

hobobaggins
2003-11-05, 19:55
you guys sound so funny...

IN SUMMARY:
you say: konichiwa
but you write (in hirigana) konichiha

romanji is how it sounds... so saying "wo" sorta irritates me

otearai wa doko desuka -where is the toilet/bathroom/restroom
dare ga otousan desuka- who is your daddy?

oh. and another thing- japanese ppl have no "r" or "l" sound individually, they combine the two sounds together so it sounds much more gentel than D.A.R.E (the organization)

7thMethuselah
2003-11-11, 09:58
you guys sound so funny...

IN SUMMARY:
you say: konichiwa
but you write (in hirigana) konichiha


Nono,

You say KoNnichiwa, the 2nd n must be pronounced or the word 'll get a different meaning (like the difference between biiru (beer) and biru (building).
and in hiragana you write koNnichiha




oh. and another thing- japanese ppl have no "r" or "l" sound individually, they combine the two sounds together so it sounds much more gentel than D.A.R.E (the organization)

the difference between the japanese r and the english one is as follows: An english r has 3 1/2 vibrations when pronounced. A japanese one has only one 1/2 vibration. The l sound has no vibration :)

The way to pronounce the japanese r the right way is to put the tip of your tongue against the top of the inside of yr mouth (i forgot the word for it) and pronounce the word without trying to cause vibrations and clapping the tongue slightly forward, if you practice ( ALOT :heh) you'll be able to do it but it's hard :)

The fu sound is even harder still haven't mastered that one) ;)

Sukato
2003-11-11, 10:15
the difference between the japanese r and the english one is as follows: An english r has 3 1/2 vibrations when pronounced. A japanese one has only one 1/2 vibration. The l sound has no vibration

The way to pronounce the japanese r the right way is to put the tip of your tongue against the top of the inside of yr mouth (i forgot the word for it) and pronounce the word without trying to cause vibrations and clapping the tongue slightly forward, if you practice ( ALOT :heh) you'll be able to do it but it's hard

The fu sound is even harder still haven't mastered that one)


Interesting, the 'r' sound is the same in Greek as it is in Japanese. If you think Japanese is hard..try the Greek letter "g" (or gamma). An English 'G' as in "great" or "good" is pronounced by the mid-section of the tongue blocking the voice against the roof of the mouth and quickly snapping down to let the voice escape (as is similar to many english letters such as 'c'). However in Greek the "g" is pronounced by the back of your tongue pushing back against the tonsils and closing the voice off at the tonsils, then letting some of the sound escape somewhat through the nasal area as the tongue lets off and produces a very slightly scratchy g/h sound.

Edit: Heh, I was way off-topic..well to add to this list I noticed a pretty common phrase that no one mentioned yet.

Onegai- please (as saying please as a statement by itself).
Onegai is also used when two opponents are about to have a match of some sort (such as Go, Shoji, various sports etc.)..though the actual defination of the word doesn't really make sense as "please" but more like "let's have a good match"..or something like that. Also in this case it's usually Onegai-shimasu.

Sugei (Tsugei? Sugoi? Not sure about spelling)- wow, amazing

Also to add some twist to this thread, some commonly spoken english derived phrases in anime:

Fight-o = a cheering phrase
dont mind = dont worry about the mistake
Lucky! = What luck!...

[Titan]
2003-11-11, 12:14
Urusei (or urusai, seen both) = Shut up (lit. annoying, can also mean: You are annoying)

sukato: I've seen sugoi a lot, but mostly that is said by girls, also seen/heard sugei, and that was said by boys (IIRC)

Onegai can also mean "I leave it up to you/in your hands" or "please take care of things for me" (check goldenboy eps 1, nearly at the end)

Silent Spring
2003-11-11, 13:47
I'm planing to go to japan agian, and I want to know how to say two key phrases, can anyone translate "do you speak english" and "where is someone who speaks english"

Also "my pants are on fire" will also be helpful... just in case.

gravitation
2003-11-11, 15:36
well i only know one of those silent spring and that is "do you speak english?" = "eigo wo hana shimasu ka" there ya go lol

Lord Raiden
2003-11-11, 21:06
Just as a quick thought, what would be the easiest way to say, "Hello, and how are you?" I'm probubly overlooking the obvious here, but I thought I'd ask anyways.

koji150
2003-11-12, 00:11
Just as a quick thought, what would be the easiest way to say, "Hello, and how are you?" I'm probubly overlooking the obvious here, but I thought I'd ask anyways.
Oi! Genki ga? オイ!元気が?


As for some other phrases/words:
Shikkari shiro! 確りしろ! - Hang in there! Hold on! Snap out of it!
Naru hodo. なるほど - I see.
Kara. から - Because, from.
Kimeta. 決めた - I have decided, I've got it.
deshou/darou. でしょう・だろう - Probably. (although it can be translated as many other things and is used differently in Japanese than an English speaker would use "probably.")
Yokatta! 良かった! - Good!.
Yatta! やった! - (I, he, she, they, we) did it!
Daga. だが - But, however.
Ara? あら? - Oh? Ah!
Doushite? どうして?- Why?
Dou suru? どうする?- What should we do?
Koitsu. こいつ - This person.
Iku zo! 行くぞ!- Let's go! Here we go! Here I go!
Yappari. やっぱり - After all.
Mae ni. 前に - Before.
Mae yori. 前より - Rather than before.
Tame ni. ために - For the sake of...
You ni. ように - In order to...
Kiite kure. 聞いてくれ - Listen.
Taihen. 大変 - Literally means "tough (situation)" but is often translated as "We have a problem," or "Oh, my God!"
Ano. あの - Um.
Sekai. 世界 - World.

(I'll update this as I find more words that are commonly used while watching Anime.)

Xess
2003-11-12, 05:11
I always thought that kudasai was the honorific form of 'to give'. But somewhat acts as 'please' if it were translated.

And onegai by itself just means 'favor' doesn't it? So onegai shimasu literally means do me a favor. (or many other meanings because the subject is left out) But in a general sense, I guess it can be used to mean please as well.

you ni - like that/be that way.
ochi-tsuku - calm down
katsu - win
makeru - defeat
kana - I wonder
kamo - probably
korosu - kill
korose yaru - I'll kill you
yurusu - forgive
yurusenai - unforgivable
urusai - noisy
shikata nai/shou ga nai - can't be helped

All words ending with 'ai' or 'oi' sometimes tend to be pronounced 'ei'. Thus you hear words like sugei and urusei.

Videric
2003-11-12, 06:00
Sumimasen kimi no pantsu o kudasai ? O_o - Can i have youre panties please

Wandering A.I.
2003-11-12, 08:18
Hmm, I see two requests not done yet. You'd be safer buying a phrase book than
trusting my limited abilities, though. ^^

>"where is someone who speaks english"

As close to the English as I can, although I did use 'can' instead of 'speak' since I
think it works better:
eigo ga dekiru hito wa doko desu ka? ("Where is someone who can do English?")

But I wouldn't be so direct with a stranger, although they might expect it from
a gaijin. If I'm looking for someone who works there who speaks English I guess:
eigo ga dekiru hito wa irasshaimasenka? (basically does someone who can do
English exist, with a polite form of exist)

If I was looking on the street, maybe:
eigo ga dekiru hito wo sagashite iru n desu ga. (a polite way of saying you're
looking for something, although I've only used it for things not people before ^^)

Perhaps:
eigo ga dekiru hito ga doko ni iru no ka oshiete kudasaimasen ka? ("couldn't you
please tell me where a person who can speak English is?" - the longer the more
polite you know ^^ Actually kata might be a more polite version of hito, I'm not
going back and rewriting, though. ;p)

>"my pants are on fire"

Best guess (verb used for a burning spaceship in Wandaba Style, hehehe):
zubon (or jiipan for jeans) ga moete imasu yo!

For some reason that doesn't sound emotional enough, maybe:
zubon ga moete iru no da zo!
zubon ga hajimete moete shimatta!
Hehehe, I give up. ^^

Btw, how come no one has done the classic:
boku wa aisu kurimu wo issho ni taberu hito ga inai no. ("I don't have anyone to
eat ice cream with.")
Let's remember our priorities after all.

K_R
2003-11-12, 09:16
--wandering a i
I think if you could trot out
「英語が出来る人はどこにいるのか教えて下さいませんか。」 and know that it's polite form, you don't really need to be asking the question ;)


"Can you speak English?" = 「英語が話せるの。」 "eigo ga hanaseru no." Very casual, but apppropriate if you are young and are addressing someone who is similarly young. (but would being able to use this level of casual speech mean that you know enough Japanese as is...)
You could be a bit more polite and say 「英語が話せいますか。」 "eigo ga hanase imasuka."

oh, and you can drop the 「僕は」 from your last sentence, it's superfluous.

--koji150

「今日は、お元気ですか。」 "konnichiha, ogenki desuka." would be more appropriate/polite. 'oi' is more of an attention getter than a greeting. If it's before 10AM, you should use 「おはようございます」. And you wouldn't ask 「お元気ですか。」 to someone you see frequently. And don't forget to bow, the depth of your bow will depend on your social standing with the other person. But, you already know that...


trivia note: ecchi is the jp pronunciation of H, which is the abbreviation of hentai. It's essentially the same thing, but ecchi has a slightly less severe connotation.

koji150
2003-11-12, 23:54
「今日は、お元気ですか。」 "konnichiha, ogenki desuka." would be more appropriate/polite. 'oi' is more of an attention getter than a greeting.
I know, but I was thinking of the shortest, most informal way. Like you would use with friends. :) But yes, that would be more appropriate just meeting someone.

K_R
2003-11-13, 02:43
Maybe with friends, you could just use 「うす。元気?」

Kobugodo
2003-11-15, 01:24
(O)kane = Money
Denwa = Phone
Sakana = Fish
Ocha = Tea (any)
Koocho = Tea (black)
ryokucha = Tea (green)
pan = bread
Tamago = egg
ringo = apple
Terebi = Television
Kuma = bear
kuma no nuigurumi = teddy bear
tadashi = but, however
sore = that
sore de = then
sore dewa = and then
sore to mo = or
umi = sea, ocean
ame = rain
mizu = water
soro soro = soon, now

Keops
2003-11-15, 08:57
Hello.

I'm not sure if this is the proper forum to ask this, but I think so ^^

I know one work for thunder in japanese is kaminari, but then, what does raigeki mean? I'm almost sure it also means thunder or perhaps lightning. The other question is about a simple sentence. I know that shiawase stands for happiness, and I also understand the use of the no particle... Then I suppose saying "Keops' happiness" would be Keops no shiawase, right? Correct me if I'm wrong.

Well, thanks in advance for the help. It's very appreciated ^_~

Xeno
2003-11-15, 10:01
If the word raigeki being with 来 then it is the next(something) such as the word raishuu, I checked my dictionary, and the only word for geki I found, is drama or a play. I'm not sure if the japanese combine their words in such ways, as I am still learning, however, if they do it that way, it could mean the next play.

[Titan]
2003-11-15, 10:25
I tried writing raigeki using japanese input, and I came up with 雷撃
the first part (雷 ) means "thunder, booming sound in the air created during stormy weather " according to babylon.com
the second part (撃 ) means "poke, push "

hope that helps a bit ^_^

[edit]
according to babelfish, 雷撃 combined means "torpedo attack" :confused:
however, 雷 means thunder, and 撃 means attack.

Strange fellows, those japanese :heh:


[edit2]
If I write "kaminari" with japanese inpu, it comes up with 雷. so I guess the pronunciaton of 雷 changes if it is used in combination with 撃

gravitation
2003-11-30, 12:55
YO! i was wondering how you say "Im learning Japanese" in japanese, i am learning japanese so i dont need a long speech or explanation etc, incase your wondering i would like to know how to say this coz i go to this japanese restraunt with my aunt alot and they speak japanese, i would like to have a short convo with em ^_^

Lord Raiden
2003-11-30, 13:27
hehe. What I do when seeing a person who might be German, I open with "Sprechen Sie Deutsch?" or "Do you speak German?" in english. :) If you get a funny look from the person, they probubly don't speak german and you go on about your business. If they do speak german, they usually reply with "Ja spreche ich Deutsch" (yes, I speak german) and the conversation takes off from there. Should work just as well for Japanese. If you want to, first ask if they speak japanese, then if they do, say you are learning it and want to practice it a bit by speaking to them in japanese. IF you're working with an instructor, have them help you with ways like this to kick of a conversation. :) I'm just kicking off my learning session in Japanese too, so I can't help you on the translation, but my suggestion for how to start a conversation should work. :)

gravitation
2003-11-30, 13:29
lol thanx lord raiden ^_^ good idea...wat i plan on doing is ordering my food in japanese and then asking how they are or summin lol :D

Shinta144
2003-11-30, 14:23
Lol, I remember what it was like being crap at speaking Japanese before..

A little hint.. books and internet are good for beggining to learning Japanese. But if you really want to learn how to speak Japanese fluently.. find someone to teach you.. and watch plenty of anime to help you pick up on Japanese pronounciation.. ^^;;

Shinta144
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Click Here - http://www.samuraiwar.com/page.php?x=872928
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kazusa
2003-12-01, 01:40
Hey guys!
*hehe* i don't mean to insult or anything but i find it so hilarious how people around the world want to learn japanese just because of the influence of anime and food. ^ ^
well, ask away if you guys have a request because i'm japanese and am 100% fluent. I'll be happy to answer any questions. :)

kj1980
2003-12-01, 03:54
YO! i was wondering how you say "Im learning Japanese" in japanese, i am learning japanese so i dont need a long speech or explanation etc, incase your wondering i would like to know how to say this coz i go to this japanese restraunt with my aunt alot and they speak japanese, i would like to have a short convo with em ^_^

Most informal way would be 「わしゃ、日本語を習っとるんじゃい!」

Or you could be boring and say 「私は日本語を習っています」

Oneesama
2003-12-01, 07:04
Most informal way would be 「わしゃ、日本語を習っとるんじゃい!」

Or you could be boring and say 「私は日本語を習っています」

would be nice if it's in romanji rather than kanji.... thinking most people cant realli read kanji ^^ onegai~

わしゃ、日本語を習っとるんじゃい! = washa, nihongo o naraa torunjyai.

私は日本語を習っています = watashi wa nihogo o naraa teimasu.

p.s. correct me if i am wrong ^^

edit: typo~

kazusa
2003-12-01, 21:39
Um... this --> わしゃ、日本語を習っとるんじゃい! isn't only informal but it's a different dialect, it's the style of language a grandpa uses, and it's actually rude... learning that wouldn't be very smart.
私は日本語を習っています is correct as the previous threads mentioned.
Again... I don't want to be rude but it's better not to learn Japanese from anime ^ ^;

Lord Raiden
2003-12-03, 16:50
Hey, as a side note, I forgot this by now, but what are the uses for things like sama, sempai, kun, chan, etc. The little suffixes that go onto the end of names. What's the proper usage of those?

Lord Raiden
2003-12-03, 16:53
EDIT: Ah, double post. Please delete. Thanks.

kazusa
2003-12-03, 18:50
Alright, when you use sama at the end of a name [usually last name] it means that you pay that person great respect or that they're an important figure. This isn't really used anymore but there are times where a housemaid or employee may refer to the head male as "danna-sama." The head female would be called "oku-sama." The two words both generally mean either "mister" and "missus" or "husband" and "wife."

Senpai is used only for people that are in your school and are older than you. No matter who it is that is older than you, you use "senpai" even if that person is your friend. Unless that person is REALLY REALLY close to you, you don't ever call older schoolmates by their names. I used to think it was ok to call those older than you by just their names if they were friends but people started thinking I was disrespectful in Japan so... yeah ^ ^;

kun is put at the end of a guy's name. If you are just classmates or acquaintances with that male you would use the last name [for example yamashita] and add the "kun" making it Yamashita-kun. If you are pretty good friends with that person then you may use the first name [for example Takashi] making it Takashi-kun.

san is very flexible but is generally used for respect. You usually add this at the end of a last name also. San is the most widely used so if you bumped into a stranger, meet a business associate, go for a job interview, you will refer to the person by their last name with "san." So Yamashita-san [business associate], Kamakura-san [person that's helping you choose your clothes in the store].
San is also used in school. San is usually used with anybody that you particularly respect. Maybe a senpai or a regular classmate that you respect more than just a schoolmate; that's when you can also use it. So, just like "kun" you use "san" with girl's names [i.e. Takeda-san & Emi-san].

chan is used with a girl's name and is generally a very casual term. Girl's will use this with other's girl's names at any age but boy's usually don't use this name past the age of about 12. This is rarely put with a last name so when you use it, always put it at the end of a girl's first name.

Those are the basics.

luckme10
2003-12-03, 19:16
Oh can someone translate this to japanese?
Where is the bathroom?
Why are your toliets all f*&^Ed up?
May I have some money?

in spanish that translates to without the accents because i don't have the right style keyboard atm.

Donde esta el bano?
Por que el vater es muy malo?
DINERO!(holds gun up to their chest)

kazusa
2003-12-03, 19:21
Where is the bathroom? = Ote-arai wa dokodesuka?
May I have some money? = Okane oh kudasai

I wouldn't mind translating the other one but I need to know if that's supposed to be in "yakuza" sort of roughness or regular talk. It's hard to translate anyway though because the Japanese language doesn't really have cuss/swear words.

luckme10
2003-12-03, 19:30
Where is the bathroom? = Ote-arai wa dokodesuka?
May I have some money? = Okane oh kudasai

I wouldn't mind translating the other one but I need to know if that's supposed to be in "yakuza" sort of roughness or regular talk. It's hard to translate anyway though because the Japanese language doesn't really have cuss/swear words.

NO swear words?!? How do they vent?? I mean i couldn't go a day without saying "YOu mother f&*^#ing Cock S(&*^ing GodD(*^n SonaB*^&Ch!.

tsurumaru
2003-12-03, 19:31
Thanks Kazusa, that was pretty useful. Any chance of a short guide to informal male/female sentence endings? yo, ze, zo, wa etc

It always made me laugh when I was working in a bar in Japan that the French Bartender there could speak almost fluent "yakuza dialect" nihongo (he had a pretty good accent too), but almost no polite form (whereas I was the otherway round - Damn Berlitz book :p ). Also my Japanese colleagues said most of the Gaijin who learnt Japanese from their girlfriends ended up sounding like girls..... ^^:

Also when I hand over my money to a cashier what is the verb they say I cant quite catch it but its something like "Hai ni sen en wo wazenkarimasu" Hmm thats probably not it at all! Gomen ne!

gravitation
2003-12-03, 19:32
well i cant see the 3rd page so im gonna post coz that usually fixes it ^_^ :D

EDIT there we go^_^

lol im sure they have swear words in japanese just not as much as us lol ^_^

Kazusa or anyone, can ya tell me about the different dialects coz i dont really understand what dialects are at the mo :heh:


o yeah no probs tsurumaru ^_^

tsurumaru
2003-12-03, 19:33
well i cant see the 3rd page so im gonna post coz that usually fixes it ^_^ :D

Thanks Gravitation! ;)

luckme10
2003-12-03, 19:38
hmm we should go offer there and offer a japanese to ebonics course. You know? So they can speak english the correct way!

Go-lytely
2003-12-03, 20:49
Yeah, can someone tell me more about Tohoku-ben. I've been able to recognize most kansai-ben since I hear it a lot in anime, but the other dialects I have a hard time picking up on.

kazusa
2003-12-03, 21:20
Ok tsurumaru, regarding slang endings... there are none.
Zo, yo and ze are just endings you add on to make your sentences sound jazzier or more laid back. They aren't endings like "san" or "kun" or "chan" to name a few.
Hm... it's really hard to explain HOW to use them but I'll try my best.

"Zo" and "ze" generally have the same effect on a sentence and from my memory [shifts through mind and tests with various verbs] it works with almost any sentence except one-word remarks like... "TOILET!" when you need the toilet ^ ^;
These attachments are usually only used by MALES so females, unless you want to be tomboyish [otemba = tomboy in japanese if you wanted to know], don't use these.
Well, if you wanted to say "I'm going to punch if you say that again" you and a "zo" [Mou ikkai ittara punchi suru ZO]. So in other words it can be used as a playful threat if attached to a positive sentence. If the sentence is negative "Kane kurenai ZO" it makes the sentence mean "he/she/it won't give money."
Argh, so hard to explain... this is the best I can do.

"yo" is the same as those up above but for girls.

All 3 of these attachments are USUALLY ok with any sentence considering those conditions but there are certain cases where they just don't work. I believe that the only way you can tell the cases apart is just by memorization. So if you wanted to add it, better to check a book or someone before using it.

Hm... as for different dialects...
Dialects are languages that are native to only a certain region in Japan. For example, Osaka-ben would be a dialect native to Osaka and certain other cities that surround Osaka like Kyoto. [A lot of Kyoto speaks Osaka-ben too].
That's what a dialect is.
I'm partly from Tokyo and partly from Osaka so I know Osaka-ben but I don't know any of the others like Nagoya-ben, Kawachi-ben, Hakata-ben, Tohoku-ben, etc. [there are too many too count since there are so many prefectures ^ ^;].
Some common dialects or forms of speaking that we use that are considered the universal dialects are hyohjungo and teineigo.
Hyojungo is the most common and that's usually what you learn in the Japanese schools within the country and outside the country.
Teineigo which, literally translated, means "proper language" and this is a very, very polite way of speaking. It's pretty difficult to master this language actually because there's a very fine line between teineigo and hyojungo. Some native speakers don't even master it so don't worry if you can't speak it. If you want an example of teineigo you should listen to Tohru from Fruits Basket. She speaks it perfectly from how much of it I know. And obvious, hyojungo is available in almost every anime you watch.

If you want to learn some Osaka-ben, just put up a post about it ^ ^

gravitation
2003-12-03, 21:33
i wouldnt mind learning some osaka-ben but would you be able to explain the whole dialects thing to me lol coz im still a little confused...why are there so many of these dialects etc ?^_^ thanx

kazusa
2003-12-03, 21:41
Hm... WHY are there so many dialects?
*haha* that's actually a hard question to answer gravitation. There just are. I mean... it's like that with almost every Asian country. In China there are different dialects, respective to their cities such as Shanghai Mandarin, Beijing Mandarin etc.
In the Phillippines there's tagalog and then there are other smaller languages.
I suppose I can use England [since that's where you're from gravitation] as an example.
Alright, so in London you have one type of British accent but that accent may change if you go down to say... Chester. Both cities may speak the same English but it just sounds different. If we take various "dialects" of English [although there are no real different dialects, they're just different] there's British English, Irish English, and American English and many more. They're all the same language but just different styles of how it's used.
The British may refer to the big thing on the road as a lorry while Americans call it a truck. British say rubbish bin while Americans say trash can. That's one way of seeing it.
Dialects in Asia are different on a bigger scale but the main concept is the same. Different dialects just develop because of different environments that people grow up in. Usually the city controls the universal dialect and then the countryside ends up having different styles all because of the whole migration back way back when.
You know, people from China and Korea tried to escape their country and they ended up settling from Japan etc.

I hope that makes sense... ^ ^;
Sorry if it doesn't, I tried my best ><

kj1980
2003-12-03, 21:41
i wouldnt mind learning some osaka-ben but would you be able to explain the whole dialects thing to me lol coz im still a little confused...why are there so many of these dialects etc ?^_^ thanx

It's sorta like how you guys have different dialects. I assume people who speak English on the (American) West Coast have a different intonnation from people in the South, from people in the Mid-East, to people on the East Coast. Then, there is also different forms of English spoken in Ireland, Great Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. Then there is the slight difference of English in Afrikaans spoken in South Africa, and Dutch in Netherlands.

It's kinda like that (I assume).


Any language is hard to explain. The best way to learn a new language is to speak it on an everyday basis. That's how I learned English...which I take pride in, coming from a Japanese immersed society.

kj1980
2003-12-03, 21:42
つーか、同じ時に返事してるし(笑)

gravitation
2003-12-03, 21:47
Hm... WHY are there so many dialects?
*haha* that's actually a hard question to answer gravitation. There just are. I mean... it's like that with almost every Asian country. In China there are different dialects, respective to their cities such as Shanghai Mandarin, Beijing Mandarin etc.
In the Phillippines there's tagalog and then there are other smaller languages.
I suppose I can use England [since that's where you're from gravitation] as an example.
Alright, so in London you have one type of British accent but that accent may change if you go down to say... Chester. Both cities may speak the same English but it just sounds different. If we take various "dialects" of English [although there are no real different dialects, they're just different] there's British English, Irish English, and American English and many more. They're all the same language but just different styles of how it's used.
The British may refer to the big thing on the road as a lorry while Americans call it a truck. British say rubbish bin while Americans say trash can. That's one way of seeing it.
Dialects in Asia are different on a bigger scale but the main concept is the same. Different dialects just develop because of different environments that people grow up in. Usually the city controls the universal dialect and then the countryside ends up having different styles all because of the whole migration back way back when.
You know, people from China and Korea tried to escape their country and they ended up settling from Japan etc.

I hope that makes sense... ^ ^;
Sorry if it doesn't, I tried my best ><
LOL it made perfect sense ^_^ thanx :D

Lord Raiden
2003-12-03, 23:01
It's sorta like how you guys have different dialects. I assume people who speak English on the (American) West Coast have a different intonnation from people in the South, from people in the Mid-East, to people on the East Coast. Then, there is also different forms of English spoken in Ireland, Great Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. Then there is the slight difference of English in Afrikaans spoken in South Africa, and Dutch in Netherlands.

It's kinda like that (I assume).


Any language is hard to explain. The best way to learn a new language is to speak it on an everyday basis. That's how I learned English...which I take pride in, coming from a Japanese immersed society.
Yeah, I know what you mean. I live in America, but I'd say we have over 150 official and 500+ unofficial dialects in this country if you will ranging from New Yorker (oh gads is that ever a fun one) to Southern, to East Coast, Northerner, Michiganer (yes, my state has its own form of english. hehe) texan, central us, west cost, northern west coast, alaskan, hawaiian, and of course the cultural versions of english coming from people of other countries like Ireland, Deutschland...er, Germany (opps), spanish, and many others. So don't feel bad. I may have lived in this country for 31 years, but if I go out of state, I tend to find that people tend to pick up different ways of saying things very easily.

zalas
2003-12-04, 01:05
Yeah, I know what you mean. I live in America, but I'd say we have over 150 official and 500+ unofficial dialects in this country if you will ranging from New Yorker (oh gads is that ever a fun one) to Southern, to East Coast, Northerner, Michiganer (yes, my state has its own form of english. hehe) texan, central us, west cost, northern west coast, alaskan, hawaiian, and of course the cultural versions of english coming from people of other countries like Ireland, Deutschland...er, Germany (opps), spanish, and many others. So don't feel bad. I may have lived in this country for 31 years, but if I go out of state, I tend to find that people tend to pick up different ways of saying things very easily.
Except for a few vocabulary differences, most of the dialect differences in America consist of pronunciation. Japanese dialects also vary in written form too, and constructs often change into different words all together (nai -> hen, etc).

ky_khor
2003-12-04, 08:26
what is the word
"what are u saying?!!!!!" (angry)

sounds like "nan da stay"

....... used by Asuka, Naruto.....

zalas
2003-12-04, 12:04
what is the word
"what are u saying?!!!!!" (angry)

sounds like "nan da stay"

....... used by Asuka, Naruto.....
I believe it's nan desu te, and please don't crosspost.

wao
2003-12-04, 13:22
For the people who don't already know, http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/jwb/wwwjdic?1C <- That is a rather helpful online dictionary.

However, if you are not sure about verb conjugations you may not get a good answer - for example if you hear "omoidashita" on TV, and you search for it you'll get something not what you're looking for. What you should actually search for is "omoidasu" - but not everyone knows that just like that. Also it's not as helpful if you don't learn hiragana - but trust me its worth learning, and quite easy too.

Interestingly, the phrase "Daijoubu" in Japanese has the kanji 大丈夫 which, in Chinese, means "big husband".

gravitation
2003-12-04, 13:43
大丈夫 which, in Chinese, means "big husband". LOL!!!
omoidashita" on TV, and you search for it you'll get something not what you're looking for yeah your rite, you have to look for whats called the "dictionary form" i think ^_^ the dashita part sets the tense doesnt it? (i know about masen and mashita etc) but what does dashita do?!

kansai
2003-12-04, 15:10
my favorites that I say often

Omae wa hontoni nanimo shiranai da ne...
You really don't know anything do you...

So de gozaru.
I see (Kenshin Style)

Shii
2003-12-04, 20:57
Ita! - Ow!
Atsui! - Ow, it's hot! (Think Pedro in Excel Saga... "ATSUI! ATSUI DESU!")
Iya-----! - Nooooooo!

gravitation
2003-12-04, 21:06
nani wo shimasu ka
means what are you doing if i remember correctly...i used to love that phrase ^_^ :D

kazusa
2003-12-04, 22:54
nani wo shimasuka means "what should we do?"
what are you doing is "nani wo shiteruno/shiterundesuka"

theprophecy247
2003-12-17, 20:57
Ippo-Thank you very much
Vash-Love and peace
Takmura- Im the greatest
miyta-faster faster faster

PiGGiEE
2003-12-17, 21:19
Ippo-Thank you very much
Vash-Love and peace
Takmura- Im the greatest
miyta-faster faster faster
!!! Did you take those out of some Hentai?? :p

zalas
2003-12-17, 22:05
Ippo-Thank you very much
Vash-Love and peace
Takmura- Im the greatest
miyta-faster faster faster
We're not talking about common sayings that anime characters use. We were talking about common Japanese sayings that ordinary people would use in real life.

Xess
2003-12-18, 14:21
I've got a question if anyone can help. In Green Green, Tenjin seems to add gowasu to the end of his sentences, and bacchigu always adds shou. Now, do those words have any meaning, or are they just 'meaningless' emotion words like wa, zo and ze?

Yeah, and I noticed that alot of Kanji makes no sense at all. I swear the kanji for kawaaii is written using the kanji river (kawa) and love (ai). I really don't think words like hontou has anything to do with a book (hon). Kimi and the suffix kun also share the same kanji. What a completely messed up writing system.

hobobaggins
2003-12-18, 14:27
not more than english's fonicks.

and i think that is just another ending... it is saying "likeyouknow?" like youknow?

or De gozaru, or Datebayo

zalas
2003-12-18, 14:29
I've got a question if anyone can help. In Green Green, Tenjin seems to add gowasu to the end of his sentences, and bacchigu always adds shou. Now, do those words have any meaning, or are they just 'meaningless' emotion words like wa, zo and ze?

Yeah, and I noticed that alot of Kanji makes no sense at all. I swear the kanji for kawaaii is written using the kanji river (kawa) and love (ai). I really don't think words like hontou has anything to do with a book (hon). Kimi and the suffix kun also share the same kanji. What a completely messed up writing system.
-shou is actually a type of conjugation. It's used in such things like "tsukurimashou~" (let's make something). Not sure about the gowasu and not sure whether -shou is used as a conjugation or just an tack-on 'pyo. The kanji for kawaii is 可愛い. The first kanji is literally 'able to,' etc. The second kanji is love. So literally, something along the lines of lovable literally. The kanji for hon in hontou is 本, which IS the same as book, but, that kanji has many meanings, one of which is "basis" or "truth." It's also used in 日本, Japan. (basis for the sun, or land of the rising sun). Remember, the writing system of Japan was borrowed from Chinese, so they simply mapped the Chinese characters to their meanings. Hence, things that may be the same Chinese character (similar meaning) would have different connotation-based words in spoken Japanese. It's like trying to map snow to the many Inuit words for snow.
Many kanji have the same readings, but vastly different meanings. Even Japanese get them wrong sometimes when they use an IME, so Microsoft IME has a short description of each kanji's meaning in Japanese for those cases.

Lord Raiden
2003-12-18, 17:43
That's perty darned sad when the Japanese read their own writing wrong. ^_^;;

Blade556
2003-12-18, 19:01
lets see...common sayings? i can name a few...

Arigato

Conichiwa (im not sure, but pretty confident)

ummm....thats all i know lol :eyespin:

aZn.Xj
2003-12-18, 20:09
i saw a thread about " kun " "chan" and "sama" from another forum, but i forgot it and the page was lost..so any one wanna explain to me , on why do they use htis words? :\

Shii
2003-12-18, 20:24
Japanese name modifiers:
X-sama: godlike
X-senpai: a high school or college student who is older than you
X-sensei: a teacher, or very respected person
X-san: comparable to "Mr." or "Mrs.", or someone you respect
X-kun: a boy you know well
X-chan: a girl you know well, or a boy you think is super-cute

Less common:
X-han: old ending for Japanese nobility
X-tan: warning, if you use this name modifier the world might blow up ;)

zalas
2003-12-18, 22:50
Japanese name modifiers:
X-sama: godlike
X-senpai: a high school or college student who is older than you
X-sensei: a teacher, or very respected person
X-san: comparable to "Mr." or "Mrs.", or someone you respect
X-kun: a boy you know well
X-chan: a girl you know well, or a boy you think is super-cute

Less common:
X-han: old ending for Japanese nobility
X-tan: warning, if you use this name modifier the world might blow up ;)

Is it me, or are we going in circles with this thread? It seems that these things have been covered before in an Animesuki thread.

Tofusensei
2003-12-19, 00:35
hehe, this thread is cute ^-^

-Tofu

Lord Raiden
2003-12-19, 01:41
Yeah, the stuff in here was covered in an old thread in the old forum that got nuked. So, we're starting fresh here. :D

Besides, I make good use of the stuff in this thread, so it's a good thing it's here. :D

Xess
2003-12-19, 04:47
Ahh, thanks for the explaination zalas. Can't help it when all the kanji look the same, sound the same and have multiple pronunciations. I guess it's understandable that they can easily get the kanji wrong themselves since there are quite a number of people who can't spell properly in English either. (Especially the word grammar for some reason)

And tofusensei, oshiete kure, "are the words that tenjin and bacchigu in green green use just tack-on words with really no meaning?"

Tofusensei
2003-12-19, 11:16
Ahh, thanks for the explaination zalas. Can't help it when all the kanji look the same, sound the same and have multiple pronunciations. I guess it's understandable that they can easily get the kanji wrong themselves since there are quite a number of people who can't spell properly in English either. (Especially the word grammar for some reason)

And tofusensei, oshiete kure, "are the words that tenjin and bacchigu in green green use just tack-on words with really no meaning?"

I'm sorry, I have never seen Green Green... :(

If you can cut out a clip or two and send to me on irc or something I can tell you! Or just spell it out on here if you can ^_^;;;

-Tofu

hobobaggins
2003-12-19, 12:49
lets see...common sayings? i can name a few...

Arigato

Conichiwa (im not sure, but pretty confident)

ummm....thats all i know lol :eyespin:

lol

arigatou <- note the u

Konichiha <- spelled, in hiragana. sounds like konichiwa

ummm... that is not all i know :eyespin:

Xess
2003-12-19, 12:52
Ahh, I mentioned it a post or two back. Tenjin from Green green tends to add de gowasu to the end of all his sentences. And Bacchigu always ends his sentences with a sho.

e.g. Saki kara ita de gowasu.

He also uses -don for name suffixes, like Yuusuke-don, or oi-don. Is it a regional dialect type of thing? Or bad speaking habits like how naruto adds tte ba yo to everything?

Lord Raiden
2003-12-19, 13:29
Actually hobobaggins, not to contridict you, but according to my english/japanese cheat sheets, it's spelled "Arigatoo". I know that's not a typo as it's spelled that way in like 3 different spots. :) OF course there may be other ways to spell it too.

Blade556
2003-12-19, 14:08
lol

arigatou <- note the u

Konichiha <- spelled, in hiragana. sounds like konichiwa

ummm... that is not all i know :eyespin:

heh, thanks for that. i'm not too good with japanese, but now i know those 2 words! yay :bow: :bow:

zalas
2003-12-19, 15:49
Actually hobobaggins, not to contridict you, but according to my english/japanese cheat sheets, it's spelled "Arigatoo". I know that's not a typo as it's spelled that way in like 3 different spots. :) OF course there may be other ways to spell it too.
It's _pronounced_ arigatoo, but spelled arigatou (ありがとう ).
And it's konnichiha (こんにちは ), pronounced ko n i chi wa (since the ha here is the same ha as the wa used in subject indication) (Literally, today (is)...)

Lord Raiden
2003-12-19, 17:26
Ah, must be they have the stuff in my book spelled phonetically to a degree as all of the speaking stuff is done in romanji. :)

Lord Raiden
2003-12-19, 23:40
Sorry to double post, but something came up in my studies that has my curiousity.

Arigatoo Gosaimasu and Ohayoo Gosaimasu.

Both use Gosaimasu, yet the first is "Thank you very much" and the second is the formal of "Good morning." What the heck does Gosaimasu mean specifically that it's used in both phrases?

K_R
2003-12-20, 01:26
It means to be. 'gozaimasu' is the polite form of 'gorazu', and 'desu' is the contracted form of 'de gozaimasu'.

Arigatō Gozaimasu only means thank you. Dōmo Arigatō Gozaimasu would be closer to thank you very much.

A note on romanisation:
In kana long vowels are indicated in a number of different ways. In the Standard System a macron is usually put over the long vowel, eg. Tōkyō. In the Kunrei System the mark used is ^, eg. Tky. Long e is always spelt ei, except in onēsan and in foreign words.

Tofusensei
2003-12-20, 02:22
Ahh, I mentioned it a post or two back. Tenjin from Green green tends to add de gowasu to the end of all his sentences. And Bacchigu always ends his sentences with a sho.

e.g. Saki kara ita de gowasu.

He also uses -don for name suffixes, like Yuusuke-don, or oi-don. Is it a regional dialect type of thing? Or bad speaking habits like how naruto adds tte ba yo to everything?

Hmm....

Those are strange indeed. Abnormal to say the least! hehe ^_^;;

According to my resources, that de gowasu business could be a contracted form of "gozansu", which is in itself a bastardization of the famous "gozaru" that Kenshin Himura always used. Apparently it was originally used in the old brothel or red-light districts (probably in Kyoto). I dunno if that helps at all. hehe

As far as that "sho" ending... That could be any number of things, and not having seen the show I really can't tell.

That -don ending is probably from a kanji that means like "rough" or "blunt", like if how tough guys talk when they are around each other... Like "Hey muthaf*cka", that sort of emotion attached, I guess..

-Tofu

Xess
2003-12-20, 05:27
Yeah, it's very strange. In Aone's and Flawless/Static's subs, de gowasu is untranslated as well. Tenjin also seems to use -don with everyone, even when speaking to teachers, he uses -don to refer to his friends. And he uses oi-don to refer to himself. Must be some strange dialect or something rather.

Lord Raiden
2003-12-20, 09:40
It means to be. 'gozaimasu' is the polite form of 'gorazu', and 'desu' is the contracted form of 'de gozaimasu'.

Arigatō Gozaimasu only means thank you. Dōmo Arigatō Gozaimasu would be closer to thank you very much.

A note on romanisation:
In kana long vowels are indicated in a number of different ways. In the Standard System a macron is usually put over the long vowel, eg. Tōkyō. In the Kunrei System the mark used is ^, eg. Tky. Long e is always spelt ei, except in onēsan and in foreign words.
Hey, thank!! ^_^

One last question (well, at least for now, hehe). I've seen gozaimashita used in place of gozaimasu in several instances. Does it have the same meaning as gozaimasu or does it have a special meaning? I haven't seen in my lesson books yet, but someone from here used it in one of their messages once, so it struck my curiousity.

Xess
2003-12-20, 17:53
gozaimashita is simply the past-tense form of gozaimasu. Japanese people seem perceive time words rather differently, as you'd never thank someone in the past tense in english. It's very confusing for me as well.

okashi
2003-12-23, 20:56
Ive been wondering something about the japanese language for quite some time now, what is the difference between "you" and "you" in japanese, I hear them say (oh, and please dont mind the spelling ;)):

anata
anta
omae
kissama
temme

And its also the same with "I", I often hear:

watashi
boku
ore

There may be some more variations of these, whats the difference between one and another? Its kind of hard to imagine that the japanese language has so many different ways to say "you" or "I". Ive thought of one reason and that is that the different forms are used by different persons, which form depends on whether the person is a boy/girl/old/young or something like that. Any knowledgable persons who can clear this up for me?

EDIT: Realized that this might be the wrong forum to post this thread in.

kj1980
2003-12-23, 21:55
Ive been wondering something about the japanese language for quite some time now, what is the difference between "you" and "you" in japanese, I hear them say (oh, and please dont mind the spelling ;)):

anata
anta
omae
kissama
temme

And its also the same with "I", I often hear:

watashi
boku
ore

There may be some more variations of these, whats the difference between one and another? Its kind of hard to imagine that the japanese language has so many different ways to say "you" or "I". Ive thought of one reason and that is that the different forms are used by different persons, which form depends on whether the person is a boy/girl/old/young or something like that. Any knowledgable persons who can clear this up for me?

EDIT: Realized that this might be the wrong forum to post this thread in.

I can go on and explain it, but you won't "fully" understand it until you live in Japan (or at least talk in Japanese with a Japanese person more than you speak English)

All I can say is, if you say "kissama" or "temme-" regularly in Japan towards someone, chances are you are going to get socked.

Shii
2003-12-23, 22:09
To oversimply it totally:

Male < ore ... boku ... watashi ... atashi > Female
Male < omae ... anata ... anta > Female

Formally you say "watakushi" and "anata".

ki-sama, temme <-- really nasty insults (omae is also condescending)

Muraki
2003-12-23, 22:14
Awww i really wouldn't suggest walking around calling ppl kisama or something ^_^;; ya...you ..... might .... get hurt :heh:

Does tone of voice count also?? I mean over here you can call someone b***h in a light hearted sort of way (if ur friends or something) At our school we have a stupid little inside joke where I call one of my friends slut in a non-insulting sort of way ^_^;; and it spins off from that...

Asakura_Y0h
2003-12-23, 22:22
I can go on and explain it, but you won't "fully" understand it until you live in Japan (or at least talk in Japanese with a Japanese person more than you speak English)

All I can say is, if you say "kissama" or "temme-" regularly in Japan towards someone, chances are you are going to get socked.

Hahahahahaha..... yes chances are that you are gonna get socked for that....

I may not be the best person to narate but I have a colleague who can explain as he was living in Japan for the last 4 years....

The Japanese language is basically divided in accordance to politeness.... i.e. from rude to really polite..... as follows :

anata anta omae kissama temme
really polite ------------------------------------------> out right rude

same goes for
watashi boku ore
Really polite ------------------> casual

some other notes :

Anata & Watashi - For conversation with ppl more senior, elder or higher rank or when polite use is needed etc.
Boku - mostly used by guys unless you're a girl and wanna sound more tomboy
ore & omae - for daily conversation with friends

kissama - although it carries a rude term, is mainly used in comics, novels, movies, etc.
temme - more oftenly used in daily rude conversation especially when you're about to insult someone..... in english it would be something like " Why you stupid S**t!!!!"

Please do feel free to correct me if I'm wrong...

Lord Raiden
2003-12-23, 23:18
Ya know, after reading this I have this strange feeling that someone's gonna either beat my *** into the ground 5 minutes off the plane in Japan, or they're going to commit ritual murder on me. 0_o Well, at least with my luck they would. Cause I'd probubly start unintentionally insulting people from the world go. :(

Asakura_Y0h
2003-12-24, 00:42
Ya know, after reading this I have this strange feeling that someone's gonna either beat my *** into the ground 5 minutes off the plane in Japan, or they're going to commit ritual murder on me. 0_o Well, at least with my luck they would. Cause I'd probubly start unintentionally insulting people from the world go. :(

Hahahahaha......... i don't think that's going to happen. Apparently according to my colleague, the ppl there are quite tolerant when trying to comprehend or accomodate someone who learnt Japanese out from some language or tuition centre... they understand that foreigners are only taught sufficient language to get them around the country......

It was only after a year in Japan that he realised that there was more to the language than just asking for directions and saying he was hungry.

okashi
2003-12-24, 09:44
Aha, thats pretty useful to know, now I know how to (not) insult people in japanese! ;)

EDIT: By the way, "ki-sama" to me sounds very polite or honoring for some reason, dont they always call people they honor for "name"-sama like okashi-sama or hokage-sama? ;)

Muraki
2003-12-24, 11:18
Sama means lord or something close to that :) usual you could just attach -san on to a name which would be like calling someone Ms. or Mr.

Just b/c kisama has "sama" in it doesn't mean it has to mean the same thing since the sama attached after a name is a title...

Shii
2003-12-25, 09:02
"sama" doesn't necessarily mean "honorable", it just means "really great".

So "kisama" I assume means "really great annoyance" or something like that.

Lord Raiden
2003-12-25, 09:59
So then annoying relatives would fall into the "kisama" catagory? :D

raikage
2003-12-25, 12:15
THe kanji for kisama
貴様 - kisama
貴 - esteemed, honored, precious
様 - sama (honorable suffix)

so I guess it's a 'so polite it's condescending' sort of thing, but I don't know for sure.

*bangs head against wall*
Do NOT use terms you've learned in manga/anime unless you REALLY understand them/what they mean/in a cultural context. ESPECIALLY if you're going to use '貴様 (きさま)' or 'お前 (おまえ)'. It used to be that 'あなた' was considered a very personal/familiar way to refer to someone, but that may not be the case anymore. I was told to instead use the person's job title or name, but 'anata' is reserved for ppl who are very close to you.

Fo referring to yourself, stick with '私 (わたし)' and NOT 俺様 (おれさま) until someone who has LIVED in Japan for a long while can tell you anything better. They may be understanding of broken Japanese, but not when you call them 'little b*tch' in their own language.

okashi
2003-12-25, 12:35
THe kanji for kisama
貴様 - kisama
貴 - esteemed, honored, precious
様 - sama (honorable suffix)

so I guess it's a 'so polite it's condescending' sort of thing, but I don't know for sure.

*bangs head against wall*
Do NOT use terms you've learned in manga/anime unless you REALLY understand them/what they mean/in a cultural context. ESPECIALLY if you're going to use '貴様 (きさま)' or 'お前 (おまえ)'. It used to be that 'あなた' was considered a very personal/familiar way to refer to someone, but that may not be the case anymore. I was told to instead use the person's job title or name, but 'anata' is reserved for ppl who are very close to you.

Fo referring to yourself, stick with '私 (わたし)' and NOT 俺様 (おれさま) until someone who has LIVED in Japan for a long while can tell you anything better. They may be understanding of broken Japanese, but not when you call them 'little b*tch' in their own language.

Umm... Could you insert some translations on the kanji 'cause right now Im reading the text as:
"Fo referring to yourself, stick with "something" and NOT "something" until someone...."
Hope you understand. ;)

Shii
2003-12-25, 16:18
Transliteration (this is raikage's post so don't pretend you're quoting me):

Do NOT use terms you've learned in manga/anime unless you REALLY understand them/what they mean/in a cultural context. ESPECIALLY if you're going to use 'kisama' or 'omae'. It used to be that 'anata' was considered a very personal/familiar way to refer to someone, but that may not be the case anymore. I was told to instead use the person's job title or name, but 'anata' is reserved for ppl who are very close to you.

Fo referring to yourself, stick with 'watashi' and NOT 'oresama' (the rude male "I" --a) until someone who has LIVED in Japan for a long while can tell you anything better. They may be understanding of broken Japanese, but not when you call them 'little b*tch' in their own language.

Megane
2003-12-25, 17:00
I think I've posted this link before, but I'll snag it to this thread too for good measure:

http://www.yale.edu/anime/glossary.html <- At the bottom of that page is a brief but concise guide on the use of Japanese pronouns.

Here is another page I've come across, which has a fair bit more detail:

http://wikibooks.org/wiki/Japanese:Pronouns

GHDpro
2003-12-25, 17:28
My 2 cts:

anata -- normal way of saying "you", but as mentioned, using name+san is better
anta -- I think this form (swalloing the second "a") is "female speech"
omae -- translates as "the one in front of me". not a friendly way of calling someone
kisama -- probably most insulting way of saying "you", as mentioned
temme -- also insulting, but a little less than kisama

watashi -- plain way of saying "I", can be both female and male
boku -- used by young boys and tomboyish girls
ore -- used by young males (ie. 16-30 etc).

And a few you missed:

kimi -- intimate way of saying "you". although I've seen it used in less intimate situations too

watak'shi -- "I" as used by noble, royalty or rich people (written: watakushi)
atashi -- female form of "watashi"
washi -- used by older people, like most grandpa's in anime

...and of course they're probably lots more...

Shii
2003-12-26, 15:12
watak'shi -- "I" as used by noble, royalty or rich people (written: watakushi)
Oh, but don't forget: "Watakushi, Rikudo Koshi wa, Excel Saga wo..."

It is used in very formal (contractual) situations as well ;)

Rhia
2003-12-27, 12:28
I dont understand how the japanese do there names, like tateshi ayu why do the use there last names? e.g ayu-chan
I was just wonderind if theres some type of rule to it..
And all the kuns, donno, chans, rins, sempai all of those does it matter wen how u use them??? is there any feminine masculine rule or anything??
I hope this is understandable...:eyespin:

boneyjellyfish
2003-12-27, 13:04
No, no, no. The way their names are setup are surname THEN first name. "Ayu" is really her first name.

I'm not a master of honorifics, but here's what I think of them:
-kun is normally used to refer to boys
-chan is normally used to refer to girls or little boys
-dono is something like "Mr." or "Ms." I haven't seen it enough to get a good grasp of it, though.
rin is not an honorific, it's just something used for nicknames
-sempai/senpai means "upperclassman/woman"
-san is a general honorific that people use to show respect
-sama is used to show deep respect.

tsurumaru
2003-12-27, 13:15
I dont understand how the japanese do there names, like tateshi ayu why do the use there last names? e.g ayu-chan
I was just wonderind if theres some type of rule to it..
And all the kuns, donno, chans, rins, sempai all of those does it matter wen how u use them??? is there any feminine masculine rule or anything??
I hope this is understandable...:eyespin:

Hi Rhia I think most of this is covered in a topic called "Common sayings in Japanese" :).

However a s a quick guide, in Japan your family name comes first therefore as an example I'll use (the infamous) Naruto's fullname:

Uzamaki Naruto

Uzamaki is his families name (or surname) and Naruto is his first (or fore) name.

The postfix's you here used after peoples names really depend on how formal you are being and in what relation the person you are speaking to is to you.

As a very rough guide:

Kun for close male friends (usually only used by young people) and with forenames ie Naruto-kun
Chan for close female friends (or as a term of endearment) used by people of all ages in an informal setting and used with a forename ie Sakura-chan.

San the equivalent of Mr/Mrs/Miss used with the family name ie Uzamaki-san

Sama (super polite equivalent) used to someone you would consider above you in social standing or by businesses with your surname ie Uzamaki-sama.

Donno (very little used postfix, I think its the equivalent of Goddess or something along those lines, used for super important people onlY).

Sempai - Basically consider this as "elder" used as a term of respect to for example students in a higher grade than you. Uzumaki-sempai.
Kohai - not heard as often, this is the opposite of sempai ie someone younger than you.
Sensei - Literally "the one who went before" used mostly as the equivalent of "teacher" as a term of respect but Doctors etc are also called using this postfix.
ie Uzumaki-sensei (if he happened to be an instructor).

There are a few more but refer to the other threads for the exact usages! :)

Ah Boney beat me to it! Damn you Boney Jellyfish! :p

ElvenPath
2003-12-27, 13:18
"Common sayings in japanese" thread here:

http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=219

boneyjellyfish
2003-12-27, 13:19
Ah Boney beat me to it! Damn you Boney Jellyfish! :p

Mwahahaha! The Jellyfish strikes again!

xris
2003-12-27, 13:25
I'll merge the two threads together (this one and the 'Common sayings in Japanese'), so to keep things together.

I think it will make it only the third time the honorifics are explained :)

Hmmm, 'Common sayings in Japanese' would seem better suited in this forum, General Chat. So I may move that over here as well.

Rhia
2003-12-27, 13:38
Oh kool thanks ppl...

okashi
2003-12-28, 10:27
Ok, so to be one the safe side people new to japanese should use watashi and anata (or the persons name + san), right?

I think Ive got that right, now Ive got another question that sort of is of the same category so Ill just post it here instead of in a new thread; Whats the difference between saying name+chan, name+kun, name+dono etc? I.e. sakura-chan, naruto-kun, something-dono (couldnt come up with a name where dono was used ;)). Im sure there are even more of these endings, Im again suspecting that it has something to with gender, -chan for girls, -kun for guys and -dono... not sure here. Are these only used by children or are adults using these terms as well?

tsurumaru
2003-12-28, 10:37
Ok, so to be one the safe side people new to japanese should use watashi and anata (or the persons name + san), right?

I think Ive got that right, now Ive got another question that sort of is of the same category so Ill just post it here instead of in a new thread; Whats the difference between saying name+chan, name+kun, name+dono etc? I.e. sakura-chan, naruto-kun, something-dono (couldnt come up with a name where dono was used ;)). Im sure there are even more of these endings, Im again suspecting that it has something to with gender, -chan for girls, -kun for guys and -dono... not sure here. Are these only used by children or are adults using these terms as well?

Heh this was brought up only 2 days ago in the "Common sayings in Japanese" thread please look there for lots of info in the most recent posts :).

http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=219

zalas
2003-12-28, 10:57
Heh this was brought up only 2 days ago in the "Common sayings in Japanese" thread please look there for lots of info in the most recent posts :).

http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=219
Can we just merge all the Japanese threads together and label it : Japanese Language Questions? READ ME FIRST!!
Or make a FAQ and post it?

LynnieS
2003-12-28, 11:51
Ok, so to be one the safe side people new to japanese should use watashi and anata (or the persons name + san), right?

I don't think - and correct me if I'm wrong here - that pronouns like "you" and "I" are as well-used in terms of grammar as they are in English, yes?

tsurumaru
2003-12-29, 08:10
Can we just merge all the Japanese threads together and label it : Japanese Language Questions? READ ME FIRST!!
Or make a FAQ and post it?

/Agrees

I don't think - and correct me if I'm wrong here - that pronouns like "you" and "I" are as well-used in terms of grammar as they are in English, yes?

This is very true, pronouns are rarely used in everyday Japanese speech.

Lets take the sentence I am a student as an example:

Watashi/Boku/ore/etc wa gakusei desu
Literally I (marks the topic) student am

However as this is a statement and you wouldn't just wander up to random people informing them you are a student for no reason (well I do worry about some of the people here :p) If you are already talking about yourself you would probably say:

gakusei desu
Literally Student am

Now since there is no subject to this sentence it could mean you/she/he/they are students too but because of the context of the sentence the subject should be understood.

Ie if someone asks you if you are a student:

Gakusei desu ka
Literally Student am (Marks the sentence as a question ie ?)

your answer:

Gakusei desu
Student am

Would be taken in the context that you were refering to yourself and not a third party (unless you happened to be stark raving mad you would answer this question referring to yourself)

If the situation calls for further confirmation that the question is about whether you are a student or a third party is a student (ie the below topic marker wa with xxx-san was not used) then simply point to your nose and say watashi/ore/boku ? with a rising intonation on the last syllable.

Please note that in polite conversation someone would have usually prefixed the above question with your name ie:

tsurumaru-san wa gakusei desu ka
Mr/Mrs tsurumaru (is the topic) Student is ?

Therefore it is not often that you would be unsure of the context of the question.

Last example, talking about a third party.

Someone asks you if Mr Tanaka is a student:

Tanaka-san wa gakusei desu ka

Mr Tanaka (is the topic) student is ?

Because they have used the wa particle to mark the topic of the sentence (as Mr Tanaka) it would be fairly long winded to answer

Tanaka-san wa gakusei desu
Mr Tanaka (is the topic) student is

Therefore just saying:

Gakusei desu
Student is

would suffice as the topic of conversation has already been stated and would be understood as Mr Tanaka by the listener.

Only use pronouns with wa, or subjects of sentences with ga, to set up the current conversation, once you've used them once you can usually omit them unless the topic or subject of the conversation changes.
Use them again if you want to change the subject of conversation or define a relationship between a subject and an object........

okashi
2003-12-29, 11:25
...
Long post
...

Only use pronouns with wa, or subjects of sentences with ga, to set up the current conversation, once you've used them once you can usually omit them unless the topic or subject of the conversation changes.
Use them again if you want to change the subject of conversation or define a relationship between a subject and an object........

This almost feels like some kind of programming language, if the type of the object is already defined there is no need to define the type any more. :p

tsurumaru
2003-12-29, 12:15
This almost feels like some kind of programming language, if the type of the object is already defined there is no need to define the type any more. :p

I'm infamous for my long potentially thread ending posts :p But what you have written is an excellent summarisation of my points. :D

LynnieS
2003-12-29, 14:07
This almost feels like some kind of programming language, if the type of the object is already defined there is no need to define the type any more. :p
LOL at okashi's restatement. But thanks, tsurumaru, for the clarification on "wa" versus "ga", though. Very useful. :)

Lord Raiden
2003-12-29, 14:18
Well, it's not thread ending by any means. :)

But Tsurumaru, you've just opened my eyes bigtime. In my Japanese language studies I've been doing the beginning lessons and we're just now starting into simple sentances and they've been confusing the hell out of me. They mentioned partials briefly, but didn't explain them yet. Your explaination is excellent and it was like an epiphany when you explained about partials. I still don't totally understand them, but I'm a lot closer to understanding and applying their uses. :) Thanks!!

Lord Raiden
2003-12-29, 14:23
Ok, guess I warm up this thread again cause I got some questions about sentance structure. I've got three things in general that I'm curious about.

1. Proper use of partials.
2. Sentance structure/order (aka what's the order of nouns, verbs, pronouns, adverbs, etc)
3. Sentance tails and when/how to use them. (IE desu, ka, etc)

Can anyone explain these to me and how to use them? Thanks.

Oxy-Cotton
2004-01-07, 00:56
Konnichi wa

I got a question just 2 encrease my knowledge...

Can someone tell me what "san" "chan" or "kun" means...
and is there a difrence between them...I always thought that they only called the boys "san" and the females "chan" ..but I guess i'm wrong on that one since I heard them in an animeserie saying "chan" to the boys..do you got the answers??? Plz...do not mind my English... :)

Kyuven
2004-01-07, 01:31
okie dokie here we go:
"-chan" is mostly in reference to girls or small children, many companies translate it as "cute" or "little"
"-kun" is used to reference someone younger than you or the same age as you, also used for someone who's rank in something is the same or lower than you
"-san" is like Mr. or Ms., the all-purpose honorific you can't go wrong using (to an extent)

in anime, they throw honorifics around left and right (-senpai, -kun, -chan, -dono, -sensei, -san)

Thany
2004-01-07, 01:31
I think the question was already answered once, but :
- San is sort of Mr/Mrs/Ms
- Chan is most likely what you give after a girl's name (or young boy's name too but I'm not 100% sure...)

iddillian
2004-01-22, 20:04
']I tried writing raigeki using japanese input, and I came up with 雷撃
the first part (雷 ) means "thunder, booming sound in the air created during stormy weather " according to babylon.com
the second part (撃 ) means "poke, push "

hope that helps a bit ^_^

[edit]
according to babelfish, 雷撃 combined means "torpedo attack" :confused:
however, 雷 means thunder, and 撃 means attack.

Strange fellows, those japanese :heh:


[edit2]
If I write "kaminari" with japanese inpu, it comes up with 雷. so I guess the pronunciaton of 雷 changes if it is used in combination with 撃

by typing in thunder attack in at babelfish i got 雷攻撃.

Shii
2004-01-22, 20:20
Babelfish is bad at Japanese translation, don't trust it.

raikage
2004-01-22, 20:37
']
[edit2]
If I write "kaminari" with japanese inpu, it comes up with 雷. so I guess the pronunciaton of 雷 changes if it is used in combination with 撃

That's exactly it. Kun'yomi and on'yomi readings.


One is the native Japanese pronunciation, kaminari.
The other, rai, is used when kan'ji appear in sets of 2 or more. (This is considered the Chinese reading.)

xavier8200
2004-01-31, 23:49
Can anyone list the meaning of the various endings that are seen on the names of anime characters?

Examples:
Sama
Kun
Chan
there are alot more Its just that I can't remember them now. Thanks for the help. And if this was already posted then the search function should be easier to use.

Shii
2004-02-01, 00:15
http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=4448
http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?p=51760#51760
http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?p=44757#44757

raikage
2004-02-01, 00:19
Actually, you can probably check all over the Internet for this one; I'm sure there are tons of sites that list them far better than we can explain them.

xavier8200
2004-02-01, 00:48
Thanks alot. I was just being lazy. Sorry if I caused any probs.
Someone can delete this thread if they want to.

Lord Raiden
2004-02-13, 13:55
Ok, obviously my last post never saw a responce. (oh well) But I now have a new question.

If a person says "Thank you" (arigatoo) how would I say "You're welcome"?? I know that Irashae (sp?) is the word for Welcome, but I'm not sure if that would be proper to use in responce to someone saying thank you. Cany anyone clarify this? Thanks.

raikage
2004-02-13, 14:09
どういたしまして

'Welcome' is いらっしゃいませ
About your other questions -

Particles: That's a hard one, are there any specific ones you have questions about
は が に へ と や の 

Sentence order goes (I think)
time, pronoun, noun, adverb, verb

Using です(だ): it means 'is', but so does あります(ある)[used for inanimate objects/when you have something] and います(いる)[living things]

Lord Raiden
2004-02-13, 17:32
Ah, so that's how sentances work. That helps a lot. I wondered how the sentance structure went. That'll help quite a bit. As far as the words though, you'll need to write those in romanji as I'm still picking through my Katakana trying to learn those. :) So I'm not that far yet. hehe.

As far as partials goes, I'm more curious how they work rather than a particular one. I've seen them used in sentances like:

Watakushi no name wa....

Hence I was kind acurious how they worked. I'm guessing they work in much the same way that the worlds "the", "is", "and", "a", "to", and others like that work in english.

zalas
2004-02-14, 14:10
Ah, so that's how sentances work. That helps a lot. I wondered how the sentance structure went. That'll help quite a bit. As far as the words though, you'll need to write those in romanji as I'm still picking through my Katakana trying to learn those. :) So I'm not that far yet. hehe.

As far as partials goes, I'm more curious how they work rather than a particular one. I've seen them used in sentances like:

Watakushi no name wa....

Hence I was kind acurious how they worked. I'm guessing they work in much the same way that the worlds "the", "is", "and", "a", "to", and others like that work in english.
Particles denote the role of what the phrase/word in front of it plays in a sentence. For example, ha (pronounced wa) denotes that the predecessor is a subject (more or less). And unless you're a woman, don't use watakushi ;)

Lord Raiden
2004-02-14, 16:45
So Watakushi would be the feminin version of I/Me and watashi would be the male version? I was originally told it didn't matter and that Watakushi was the formal and Watashi was the informal.

chibi Jiraiya plushy
2004-03-01, 17:31
Can you tell me how to say
"I'm not different, I'm special"

Roots
2004-03-01, 18:51
Can you tell me how to say
"I'm not different, I'm special"


Watashi wa chigaimasen. Tokubetsu desu.

I'm not sure if the context of different matches with chigaimasen in this case though. Might want a second opinion. If you want I can write it in Japanese characters too.

MwyC
2004-03-01, 22:26
now my japanese is horrible, and i have no idea whether this is right
but i think wa should be ga instead
as it places emphiasis on different?

Roots
2004-03-01, 22:51
wa is a subject marker partical. Since the subject is about one's self, I thought it would be most appropriate. I believe you are right though, that ga places more emphasis than wa. I can't remember though. Been too long since I took JPNS 101 :)

raikage
2004-03-01, 23:00
I'm not sure if this carries the same cultural connotation - that is, if you say this, people might just stare at you blankly.

hobobaggins
2004-03-02, 01:27
I'm not sure if this carries the same cultural connotation - that is, if you say this, people might just stare at you blankly.

people will do that anyway.

Watashi wa chigaimasen. Tokubetsu desu.
there is where to put the stresses...

microlith
2004-03-02, 04:21
Or if you want to be boastful (and are a guy):

"Ore ga betsu ja nee, tokubetsu da!"

俺が別じゃねぇ、特別だ!

Roots
2004-03-02, 09:17
Or if you want to be boastful (and are a guy):

"Ore ga betsu ja nee, tokubetsu da!"

俺が別じゃねぇ、特別だ!


Nice :D I played the role of "Aniki" in a Yakuza skit in my Japanese class a couple weeks ago. Its so much fun talking like that and annoying all the politeness crap.

Wandering A.I.
2004-03-03, 00:34
Forget gangsta, let's go with the (conceited) little girl approach ^^:
atakushi ga chiagau mono ja nai mon! erai desu wa!

Edit: OK, I added conceited in parentheses. ;p As long as we aren't using the "Special Olympics" definition of special it seems to fit to me, hehehe.

zalas
2004-03-03, 01:24
Forget gangsta, let's go with the little girl approach ^^:
atakushi ga chiagau mono ja nai mon! erai desu wa!
That sounds like a cross between a little girl and a regal queen ^^;

Blue*Dragon
2004-03-04, 14:46
hello I have an question about japanese words

i see sometimes the - in the translated from how you speak the figure. what does that mean??

hobobaggins
2004-03-04, 14:47
It might mean you stress the aforementioned vowel more....

is it a "-" or a "~"

Roots
2004-03-04, 15:12
It might mean you stress the aforementioned vowel more....

is it a "-" or a "~"

- is making the vowel into a long vowel (in katakana)

~ is not really a Japanese character I think, but it is kind of like - but with more umm.....stress? Its difficult to explain without a contextual example

7thMethuselah
2004-03-04, 15:34
a - in japanese script actually means that the previous tone should be given twice the length. In japanese each tone has an equal length so the word daisuki which consists on the tones da i su ki would have a length of 4. When you use a - the tone gets lenthened so da becomes daa, ki would become kii, o becomes oo etc.

It's importance comes from a simple example

biru = bi ru has a length of two and means building
biiru (or bi-ru if you would write it in japanese) = has a length of three which means beer.

The - symbol is only used in katakana, in hiragana the streesed vowel gets repeated.

Jinto
2004-03-04, 15:48
I could hardly tell the difference if there was only the single word spoken. Often the use in context is necessary (at least for me)

Roots
2004-03-04, 15:53
I could hardly tell the difference if there was only the single word spoken. Often the use in context is necessary (at least for me)

Yeah when Japanese speak fast the difference is barely noticable. Context is everything in Japanese.

Lord Raiden
2004-03-04, 17:37
Ain't that the gospel truth. That's one thing I'm really struggling with in my comprehension skills is how fast they speek. A lot of the time I have to go on as many keywords as I can pull out of the sentance to actually understand what the person is saying, so if I only catch 3-4 in a 20 word sentance, I'm perty bloody well screwed when trying to understand someone. :(

But I figure in time I'll be able to understand it as easily as I learned German. Speaking of which, I need to brush up on that again once I finish learning Japanese. :) Mein Deutsch wird rostig heutzutage. ;)

askingquestions
2004-04-26, 18:42
it is very confusing i dont even get it its like not even the order of how we speak english hah. Maybe someone might wanna explain for me please?

Lexander
2004-04-26, 18:48
You need to worry about your english first. Your post is missing 2 vital periods.

kj1980
2004-04-26, 19:14
The grammar (the sentence structure) of Japanese is very simple:

English: SVO (subject-verb-object)
Japanese: SOV (subject-object-verb)

So long as you keep this in mind, the rest is just practice.

mantidor
2004-04-26, 19:26
I think your problem is that japanese omits a lot everything, like the names or the verbs, if someone says "koen he" means basically I go to the park but the complety sentence would be "watashi ha koen he ikimasu", you omit things when the interlocutor is supposed to know the context of the phrase. Is similar with spanish, but easier, because the conjugation of the verb indicates the pronoun.

zalas
2004-04-26, 20:39
I'm seeing a lot of these threads lately, and thought that it might be a good idea to post a sticky of the most commonly asked questions about the Japanese language. A good start would be to comb thru threads like these and post the most relevant information on them.

LynnieS
2004-04-26, 21:32
I think your problem is that japanese omits a lot everything, like the names or the verbs, if someone says "koen he" means basically I go to the park but the complety sentence would be "watashi ha koen he ikimasu", you omit things when the interlocutor is supposed to know the context of the phrase. Is similar with spanish, but easier, because the conjugation of the verb indicates the pronoun.A minor correction. The hirogana symbol for "ha" is pronounced "wa" when it's used to indicate the topic, and the symbol for "he" is pronounced "e" if it's used as a place indicator. You can also use "ni" instead of "e".

Doesn't "koen e" or "koen ni" mean "to/from/at the park" as well? Don't you still need a verb there?

mantidor
2004-04-26, 21:36
A minor correction. The hirogana symbol for "ha" is pronounced "wa" when it's used to indicate the topic, and the symbol for "he" is pronounced "e" if it's used as a place indicator. You can also use "ni" instead of "e".
I know, but im used to write it like that, thanks for the correction anyway!!

Lord Raiden
2004-04-27, 23:36
I'm seeing a lot of these threads lately, and thought that it might be a good idea to post a sticky of the most commonly asked questions about the Japanese language. A good start would be to comb thru threads like these and post the most relevant information on them.
IT's strange that you should say that because I started a thread a while back called "Common Sayings in Japanese" and that kinda covered a lot of things dealing with the language.

I myself probubly should look it over again as I'm now into the next level of my japanese studies which involves Te form verbs, present possessive, and the use of partials among many other things and I think I've smelled braincells frying on a few occations while studying. :(

Dude, I so need a tutor who I can sit down with and pick their brains while studying this stuff. If I can get this stuff explained in a bit more detail while I'm learning it, I think that it will be easier to grasp, or at least quicker to grasp.

raikage
2004-04-28, 00:09
it is very confusing i dont even get it its like not even the order of how we speak english hah.

Um...no...it is not.

*shrugs* What do you expect us to say? Seriously? The grammar isn't all that complicated at the basic A は B です sentence.

Lord Raiden, are you now into ~ています and such? The fun's only beginning... :heh:

LynnieS
2004-04-28, 03:49
IT's strange that you should say that because I started a thread a while back called "Common Sayings in Japanese" and that kinda covered a lot of things dealing with the language.

I myself probubly should look it over again as I'm now into the next level of my japanese studies which involves Te form verbs, present possessive, and the use of partials among many other things and I think I've smelled braincells frying on a few occations while studying. :(

Dude, I so need a tutor who I can sit down with and pick their brains while studying this stuff. If I can get this stuff explained in a bit more detail while I'm learning it, I think that it will be easier to grasp, or at least quicker to grasp.
Heh. I know that my language teacher is getting pretty disgusted at me for not studying as hard as she would like. It would be nice to have a group session, but it really helps to drive the point into memory by using the language.

Have you tried the JREF forum (http://www.jref.com/forum) yet? They're likely to be more helpful and have better studying ideas than here on the AS forum (no offense to anyone) since people are usually here for anime. There are other AS members on that one also.

Lina Inverse
2004-04-28, 22:20
A minor correction. The hirogana symbol for "ha" is pronounced "wa" when it's used to indicate the topic, and the symbol for "he" is pronounced "e" if it's used as a place indicator. You can also use "ni" instead of "e".

Doesn't "koen e" or "koen ni" mean "to/from/at the park" as well? Don't you still need a verb there?
For "from", you use -kara.
Doko kara ikimasu ka. - Koenkara.
Where (do you) come from? - (I come) from the park.

LynnieS
2004-04-28, 22:37
For "from", you use -kara.
Doko kara ikimasu ka. - Koenkara.
Where (do you) come from? - (I come) from the park.True, and "-made" is for "to" (edit - and "as far as", "until", and "up to"). I'm really not sure what is the English equivalent (meaning-wise) for the "ni" particle, or even if there is one.

Edit - No, there is apparently seven:

at; in; on (with respect to time)
at; in; on (with respect to place)
to; for
by; from
on; onto
to do [something]; in order to do [something]
to; toward

Oy...

Can "ni" be used without a verb like "ikimasu", "kimasu", and such? It feels wrong, but...

Lord Raiden
2004-04-29, 00:06
Lord Raiden, are you now into ~ています and such? The fun's only beginning... :heh:
Yes, I'm into my Kanji, Hirigana, and Katakana, but it's proving a bit more challenging than I expected. Oh well, I'll keep plodding along. I could probubly learn this faster if I had a tutor to work with.

Shoujinryouri
2004-04-29, 00:45
True, and "-made" is for "to" I'm really not sure what is the English equivalent (meaning-wise) for the "ni" particle, or even if there is one.

Can "ni" be used without a verb like "ikimasu", "kimasu", and such? It feels wrong, but...

I have only studied Japanese for 3 years, but I will give this my best stab.
The particle "ni" is used as a go-between for (place) +ni+ (motion verb).
Another approximation of "ni" is "in." For instance: "kono zisyo ni arimasu ne?" "it's in this dictionary...right?" So, the structure would be (place nominal)+ni+(arimasu).
As far as I know, it is necessary to keep the verbal. However, in informal conversation, the sentences can be shortened, and much more becomes implied. The ni is also dropped.
EX:
"iku?" (are you going?)
"Nn. ikanai" (no, I'm not going)
This is a lot shorter than
"ikimasu ka?"
"iie, ikimasen"
Both conversations mean the same thing, only their formality level changes. Also, notice the "ni" is dropped. That's because in casual-style conversation, many particles are dropped.

I do hope that helped.
If anyone has any questions, feel free to ask. Though I am only a beginner, I can take a stab at it.

raikage
2004-04-29, 02:44
There's no one-word equivalent for に, it has too many uses.

LynnieS
2004-04-29, 06:23
There's no one-word equivalent for に, it has too many uses.
:) I picked up a Japanese grammar dictionary earlier, and flipped through it to find what it has listed. It gave page after page of definitions and examples for "ni". (See above) Complicated. :)

Xess
2004-04-29, 13:55
The 'ni' particle may serve a lot of grammatical purposes, but it is no different than words like 'of' which also has too many uses to be able to describe from the top of your head.

Sakai
2004-04-30, 08:27
The particle 'ni' reminds me of 'tonarinoniwaniwaniwaniwatorigaita.' :)

Secca
2004-04-30, 08:41
What's that mean? the person next next next next something? ^^

raikage
2004-04-30, 09:55
The particle 'ni' reminds me of 'tonarinoniwaniwaniwaniwatorigaita.' :)

Hm..."there was a chicken next to the garden?"

Secca
2004-04-30, 10:09
The particle 'ni' reminds me of 'tonarinoniwaniwaniwaniwatorigaita.' :)
Hm..."there was a chicken next to the garden?"
heh, there is something next to the "niwaniwaniwaniwatori" ? ^^

niwatori is a chicken, right..? ^^

I know yakitori is a fried chicken.

7thMethuselah
2004-04-30, 11:27
For "from", you use -kara.
Doko kara ikimasu ka. - Koenkara.
Where (do you) come from? - (I come) from the park.

wouldn't that be "doko kara kimasu ka" since kimasu is the verb for to come while ikimasu means to go. Ikimasu is mostly used with made or ni/e I thought

yeah and the ni particle is something of a garbage particle, if nothing else works use ni :heh: .

kj1980
2004-04-30, 13:20
heh, there is something next to the "niwaniwaniwaniwatori" ? ^^

niwatori is a chicken, right..? ^^

I know yakitori is a fried chicken.

aaaa! The horror of conjoined romaji!

Please write it as: tonari no niwa ni wa niwa niwatori gaita

隣の庭には二羽ニワトリがいた (There are two chickens in the neighbor's backyard)

Xess
2004-04-30, 13:33
Hah, that's so cool. Isn't there one using chase ('ou') as well?

Secca
2004-04-30, 14:00
the nightmare, I couldn't figure that one out at all. >_<

Thanks KJ, it make sense now. ^^

ensyak
2004-04-30, 14:14
aaaa! The horror of conjoined romaji!

'sumomomomomomomomomomosumomomomomomomomonouchi'

スモモも桃、桃も桃、スモモも桃も桃のうち
(A plum is a kind of peach, a peach is also a peach, both plum and peach are kinds of peaches.)

This is the most terrible romaji line I've ever seen...

EDIT:Japanese call plums 'sumomo(sour peach)'.

Secca
2004-04-30, 14:16
'sumomomomomomomomomomosumomomomomomomomonouhci'

スモモも桃、桃も桃、スモモも桃も桃のうち
(A plum is a kind of peach, a peach is also a peach, both plum and peach are kinds of peaches.)

This is the most terrible romaji line I've ever seen...
I seeing stars now. :eyespin: >_<

Sakai
2004-05-01, 08:41
That means "There were two chickens in the next garden."

Oh, kj1980 has answered it. ^^

Hm..."there was a chicken next to the garden?"
It means "niwa no tonari niwa niwatori ga ita."

I know yakitori is a fried chicken.
'yakitori' is 'barbecued chicken' or 'roast chicken'.

'fried chicken' is 'furaidochikin :D' or 'karaage'.

Secca
2004-05-01, 08:47
'fried chicken' is 'furaidochikin :D' or 'karaage'.
aaaa, so that's what "karaage" means. I heard that in Rumiko Gekijo, but have no idea what kind of food is "karaage".

Thanks. ^^

kj1980
2004-05-01, 23:00
'sumomomomomomomomomomosumomomomomomomomonouchi'

スモモも桃、桃も桃、スモモも桃も桃のうち
(A plum is a kind of peach, a peach is also a peach, both plum and peach are kinds of peaches.)

This is the most terrible romaji line I've ever seen...

EDIT:Japanese call plums 'sumomo(sour peach)'.

tongue twisters....ah, reminds me of my English instructor who taught me:

"She sells sea shells on the sea shore"
...this was very difficult for me since all of them sound with シー in Japanese and there is no differentation between "sea" and "she" in Japanese pronounciation....

here's several for you:

Konokonakanakakatakanakakenakattana, nakanakattakana?
この子なかなかカタカナ書けなかったな、泣かなかったかな?

Butagabutaobuttanodebutaretabutagabuttabutawobutta buta!!
ブタがブタをぶったのでぶたれたブタがぶったブタをぶったブタ!!

Konotakadakegakinitakadaketatekaketanowatakadaketa tekaketakattakaratakadaketatekaketa
この高竹がきに 高竹立てかけたのは 高竹立てかけたかったから 高竹立てかけた

Secca
2004-05-02, 03:01
W KJ, at the sea shells. ^^

Konokonakanakakatakanakakenakattana, nakanakattakana?
この子なかなかカタカナ書けなかったな、泣かなかったかな?


ummmm... This child sometimes use ???? person, never use it before?

lol I sounds horrible. doesn't make any sense at all. ^^
Butagabutaobuttanodebutaretabutagabuttabutawobutta buta!!
ブタがブタをぶったのでぶたれたブタがぶったブタをぶったブタ!!
A pig is a pig.....umm..............pig!! >_<

raikage
2004-05-02, 07:17
Konokonakanakakatakanakakenakattana, nakanakattakana?
この子なかなかカタカナ書けなかったな、泣かなかったかな?

Actually, sounds more like
"The kid couldn't write katakana, yet he didn't cry" ...I think.....?

Lord Raiden
2004-05-02, 13:34
Here's a question I got for your guys in regards to grammer. Actually, it relates to reading Kanji. How in God's name do you tell where one word ends and the next begins??? I still haven't figured that out. In English we at least have spaces. In Japanese I hardly see any spaces or anything to denote where one word ends and the next begins when reading Kanji/Hiragana/Katakana. Can anyone give me pointers on that?

raikage
2004-05-02, 15:34
Um...not really...it just comes with time...

Secca
2004-05-02, 15:45
Being able to read the kanji and know what it mean, helps alot.

But I couldn't. T.T

|)arK_Nin
2004-05-02, 19:40
1-10 how hard is Japanese to learn? Im interested in learning and registered for classes for next year.

LynnieS
2004-05-02, 23:52
Um...not really...it just comes with time...
Truth. With reading and studying.

You can try and split on particles, but the syllables that make these up are also used in words in Hiragana. There're also adjectives and such modifying the sentence. Not really a good idea to get into the habit of depending on this, IMHO.

Words in Katakana are easy to recognize once you know the two sets of syllabary, though, and Kanji words are as well.

mantidor
2004-05-03, 01:03
tongue twisters....ah, reminds me of my English instructor who taught me:

"She sells sea shells on the sea shore"
...this was very difficult for me since all of them sound with シー in Japanese and there is no differentation between "sea" and "she" in Japanese pronounciation....


reminds me of the confusion I got from shousetsu 小説 (novel) and chousetsu 調節 (to adjust), happens that in spanish there is not "sh" sound, only "ch",so we have to learn it from scratch. When you begin to learn english you always pronounce "shop" and "chop" the same, eventually you learn to pronounce it, but you always confuses them when you hear them.

the phrase was like this: コーヒーの自動販売機は砂糖やミルクをボタンで調節できる。we were translating and I said "in japan expending machines can write novels?", the look in my japanese teacher's face was unforgettable! :heh:

nothing like the coreguaje (an indian language here) the have a special vowel that is pronounced like an "u" but with your lips like if you were pronouncing an "a", just try it, is almost impossible!

Not to mention russian or chinese pronunciation :eyespin: I'll just have my spanish, english and my poor japanese (looking forward to improve it) thank you very much.

Lina Inverse
2004-05-03, 02:29
Kono ko nakanaka kataka nakakenakattana, nakanakatta kana?
この子なかなかカタカナ書けなかったな、泣かなかったかな?

-> This child really couldn't write katakana, the kana didn't cry.

Buta ga buta o butta no de buta reta buta ga butta buta wo butta buta!!
ブタがブタをぶったのでぶたれたブタがぶったブタをぶったブタ!!

-> The pig hit the pig which had hit the pig since the pig had hit the pig... I think :heh:

Konotakadakegakinitakadaketatekaketanowatakadaketa tekaketakattakaratakadaketatekaketa
この高竹がきに 高竹立てかけたのは 高竹立てかけたかったから 高竹立てかけた

-> Something about high bamboo that leans on high bamboo in a high bamboo fence... or the likes :heh:

@mantidor:
コーヒーの自動販売機は砂糖やミルクをボタンで調節できる。
The coffee vending machine can add sugar and milk by a button.

Secca
2004-05-03, 08:34
Kono ko nakanaka kataka nakakenakattana, nakanakatta kana?
この子なかなかカタカナ書けなかったな、泣かなかったかな?

-> This child really couldn't write katakana, the kana didn't cry.

Buta ga buta o butta no de buta reta buta ga butta buta wo butta buta!!
ブタがブタをぶったのでぶたれたブタがぶったブタをぶったブタ!!

-> The pig hit the pig which had hit the pig since the pig had hit the pig... I think :heh:

Konotakadakegakinitakadaketatekaketanowatakadaketa tekaketakattakaratakadaketatekaketa
この高竹がきに 高竹立てかけたのは 高竹立てかけたかったから 高竹立てかけた

-> Something about high bamboo that leans on high bamboo in a high bamboo fence... or the likes :heh:

@mantidor:
コーヒーの自動販売機は砂糖やミルクをボタンで調節できる。
The coffee vending machine can add sugar and milk by a button.
Rofl I couldn't even get close to the konotakadake... , it's just way above my level. ^^

Butta = is to hit something? I tought "Buta" could mean big also.

what is "reta"?

I also tought "katta" is a formal referal to a person. I guess not it could mean something else. ^^

kinniku_man
2004-05-05, 08:47
貴社の記者が汽車で帰社した

Carpe Jugulum
2004-06-08, 17:09
please can anybody translate english into kanji??

its a saying in kenpo and i would really apreciate it if anyone could help PM me if you can thanks alot

anyway the saying is:

Those who sweat more in practice, bleed less in battle

its for my friend who does kenpo

and if you could like post an image of what the symbols look like that would be really good of you

thanks

Sai
2004-06-08, 17:26
google is your friend! but i go here when i need to translate stuff http://babelfish.altavista.com/

Carpe Jugulum
2004-06-08, 17:35
google is your friend! but i go here when i need to translate stuff http://babelfish.altavista.com/


thanks i did try google but it kept trying to sell me stuff il cheak out that site tho

thanks

Carpe Jugulum
2004-06-08, 17:41
haha you got to read this i typed in .. those who sweat more in practice bleed less in battle...... but it didnt come up with exactly what i wanted.

so i switched the words round a bit to see if it would come up with anythign better i typed .....bleed less in battle sweat more in practice but that translated to

出血在爭鬥實踐上冒汗了 - whihch roughly translated to ... The hemorrhage practiced at the battle on sweats
hahahah

RichMan
2004-06-15, 04:38
Alright, i'm making another website, and I want to call it "RichMan Universe"

Can someone translate that into japanese for me? Because I want to make a cool header that says it in english and japanese.

I tried using Altavista's Babel Fish to translate it and this is how it went:

I typed in "Rich Man Universe" (notice the space between Rich and Man because it won't translate it together), and set it on English to Japanese. After it finished translating this showed up...

豊富な人の宇宙

To make sure it said "Rich Man Universe" I selected Japanese to English to see if it worked right. So I copy/paste'd the japanese text and it translated to this...

Outer space of abundant person

WTF?? Outer space of abundant person..No! I want it to say RichMan Universe.

Could someone help me out? and while your at it, could you type the japanese text for "Hell yeah!"

Yebyosh
2004-06-15, 05:00
The correct grammatical usage for what you describe should be "Richman's Universe" isn't it?

You would be advised to use Katakana for your name (because non-Japanese have their names expressed in Katakana) and leave 宇宙 as is. Outer space is just one of the meanings for 宇宙. It can also mean the Universe.

So what you are looking for should be

リッチメンの宇宙

RichMan
2004-06-15, 05:14
Nah, it isn't "RichMan's Universe." I want it to say "RichMan Universe." I got the idea off of the anime "Tenchi Universe." It really doesn't mean much, I just think "RichMan Universe" sounds cool.

Thany
2004-06-15, 05:33
Nah, it isn't "RichMan's Universe." I want it to say "RichMan Universe." I got the idea off of the anime "Tenchi Universe." It really doesn't mean much, I just think "RichMan Universe" sounds cool. Well, then just take off the の : it's what show the fact that it's a possession.
So would be like : リッチメン宇宙

LynnieS
2004-06-15, 07:09
Well, then just take off the の : it's what show the fact that it's a possession.
So would be like : リッチメン宇宙
の isn't just for possession, though; it can also be used to expand on the noun being modified. In this case, it would be explaining the purpose behind "宇宙", no?

Thany
2004-06-15, 07:55
So you mean it does also mean what he wanted to mean?
Then I guess it's all good :D

LynnieS
2004-06-15, 08:34
So you mean it does also mean what he wanted to mean?
Then I guess it's all good :D
Fairly sure. The particle is supposed to combine two nouns into one with the possessive seems to be the most well known.

RichMan's Universe
Universe about RichMan
Universe [created] by RichMan

and so on.

/me likes the dictionary on Japanese grammar. :D

raikage
2004-06-15, 09:26
I typed in "Rich Man Universe" (notice the space between Rich and Man because it won't translate it together), and set it on English to Japanese. After it finished translating this showed up...

豊富な人の宇宙

To make sure it said "Rich Man Universe" I selected Japanese to English to see if it worked right. So I copy/paste'd the japanese text and it translated to this...

Outer space of abundant person

WTF?? Outer space of abundant person..No! I want it to say RichMan Universe.

Could someone help me out? and while your at it, could you type the japanese text for "Hell yeah!"

LMAO "rich man" could be interpreted as "wealthy man" -> "abundant person"

I would actually leave the の in there, personally...

Lord Raiden
2004-06-15, 19:23
YAY!!! Someone found my old thread! :D Search hates me so I couldn't find it before. :(

Sakai
2004-06-16, 08:28
RichMan (sing.)
リッチメン (pl.)

I heard Japanese nouns have no plural forms. ;)

Alright, i'm making another website, and I want to call it "RichMan Universe"
I think リッチマン☆ユニバース looks cool. :D

could you type the japanese text for "Hell yeah!"
ヤッタ~! (http://www.mit.edu/people/patil/yatta.html) :p

NarutoHead
2004-06-26, 23:13
Maybe this has been done but this is what I know so far and what I'd like to know

sama- highest respect

san- middle, used as politness to strangers/when theres nothing else to use

kun- lower sometimes with peers

chan- family/close friends and lovers.

ok what's


oni? is that brother? or big? oni-chan i believe is big brother. so maybe oni is brother?

and what other suffixes and prefixes did I miss.

*as a side note, i'd like to ask in the japanese language are prefixes and suffixed used eveyrhting you speak a persons name?? that would take some getting used to to me.

well thx, and if this thread has been made already or is in the wrong spot, you can just throw me the link to where the other is and i'll just read that :)

ZhanDVG
2004-06-26, 23:38
Hokay, well... big brother is actually oniisan or niisan... or I guess onii. Or even just nii ( 兄 ) maybe... ;p Whatever, the point is, with two i's, it's big brother, with one i (oni), it means ghost or devil or demon... ( 鬼 )

And, umm... you've got the other stuff down pretty basic, if anyone else wants to tackle fleshing out all the different meanings and uses of those go ahead, I'm kinda in a rush ;x

RobertM
2004-06-26, 23:39
Oni is a demon.
O-nii-chan is big brother. It can also be nii-chan, nii-san, o-nii-san, or aniki. You have to be careful with those pesky long vowels (eg. ii vs i). A Japanese native speaker can pick them up almost every time.

wao
2004-06-26, 23:44
There probably is anotehr thread about it somewhere but I can't seem to find it either :P Not very good at using th search engine, I am...

But anyway, it's onii-san just for the record, not oni-san :) Oni means demon. I'd love to call my brother oni-san sometimes...
Elder brothers may also be referred to as "Ani", "Aniki" or "Ani-ue".

Younger brothers can be "Otouto". (Also only when talking about them...)

Onee-chan (pronounced like o-nay, instead of onii which is like o-knee) is elder sister. Nee-chan is also used (but can also refer to any ol lady on the street who is youngish...)
Elder sisters may also be referred to as "Ane", "Aneki", or "Ane-ue".
Younger sisters are usually "Imouto" (Only when talking about them, not to them...),

(For both, -san and -chan are kind of interchangeable. I think.)

-sensei is used for teachers...

I'm not sure about -chin, which is what that annoying Kippei (-oni-chan!) uses when referring to Kokoro sometimes in the anime Aishiteruze Baby.

-tachi is used to refer to a group. For example you want to refer to the Monsters in Melody of Oblivion, you say "monster-tachi". It varies with the context.

-senpai is for people who are seniors to you (in school, that is...). Or if you are in the same line of work as them and they are senior (but not very much senior) or better than you. E.g. Jungle wa Itsumo Hale Nochi Guu (which is an excellent anime), Asio calls Bel "Sempai" even though they're not in school, they're servants for the large mansion.
It's respectful to add -senpai. You don't call your juniors anything special though...

Anata is a word that means "You" but when in the context of lovers, it is something like "Darling"...

Melazoma
2004-06-26, 23:53
Actually, "Ani" is "Older Brother." "Otouto" for "Younger Brother." Unlike in English-based cultures, "Older Brother" and "Younger Brother" have distintive words for each in most Asian cultures.

Now for my personal speculation :) on the usage "Onii-chan": It seems to be just a abbreviated/concantenated(sic) form of O-ani-chan, where the "O" is also a level of respect or a recognition of importance. You hear all the time "O-bento(lunchbox)," "O-furo(bath)," or "O-Kyaku-sama(Valued Guest/Customer)." Those are just of fraction of "O" as a prefix.

Adding to wao's "sensei"--"sensei" can be used to to speak to all kinds of people whom you recognize as having more knowledge than you do, and that . For instance, Medical doctors, lawyers to a movie directors, anime & manga artists.

"-chin" is just a very "endearing" suffix. Watch Godannar^^

Also, it seems rude if you were to speak to a "sensei" or "senpai" level person and use "Kimi," "Anata," or god-forbid, "Omae." (various forms of "you") You just refer to them as "senpai/sensei," or use it as a suffix like "Katakura-senpai."

dreamless
2004-06-26, 23:56
from what little I know

-sensei can be teacher, doctor, or calling any profession with a respect.

-chan basically means "little" I think, you call someone -chan if you think they are adorable.

-sama mostly means "master", "superior", somewhat similar to -dono (but -dono sounds archaic now I guess)

DarkCntry
2004-06-26, 23:58
my honorific knowledge is still pretty low, but I know a bit..

-sensei is typically added to a person of professional stature; doctor's, teachers, trainers, etc

-san/-chan/-kun/-sama are all honorifics used to display towards another person...
-san typically is the standard in honorifics
-chan is typically a more affectionate title given to children and people with a close relationship, mainly it's to show a cute-like affection
-kun is typically attached to a male person's name, for example KGNE, "Takayuki-kun"

Then you get ones like -sama, -no, -ko. -sama is usually a very high-honor given, something like "lady" or "lord" or similar. -no is found between a highly bonded relationship, or at least that was what I am told. -ko generally is an affectionate suffix to a girl, a pet-name if you will.

onii is older brother, and onee is typically sister. I've seen several different spellings of onee and I cannot be too sure of the correct one. Anyone care to tell me? :)

Of course I'm tired so this may be all incorrect...but hey I'm going on what little I know :)

Melazoma
2004-06-27, 00:12
-kun is pretty much unisex in that it can be used (at the very least) in professional settings for a superior to address a lower level worker, be said worker male or female.

Ke0
2004-06-27, 04:18
The O you guys are using and hearing, come from the old Japanese honorific system, I only know some words, but they are long haha. But for the sibling thing.

Little one calls big one Onii-san for brother and Onee-san/chan for big sister.

The older just calls the younger by their first name followed by kun/chan

Here are more titles that some of you may not have known.

------

Ojii - Grandpa
Obaa - Grandmother
Oji - Uncle

When talking to doctors and the like, while people say use sensei and sama, most times you'll hear

Obisa-san (Doctor)
Honya-san (Bookseller)
bengoshi-san (lawyer)
etc
etc


Dono - Least used and known title in Japanese, I'd say it's more polite than san, but less polite than sama. Only time most people use it is when you're a higher figure, and your writing a letter, san isn't formal enough, and sama makes it seem like your putting the person your writing to on your level, or putting yourself on theirs, so you use dono, other than that, it's rarely used. Well, the only time I've used it is writing letters to underclassmen when I was in Japan.

Edit: N/M it requires that you know how to conjugate fairly well.

kj1980
2004-06-27, 04:22
Obisa-san (Doctor)

( ,_ゝ`)プッ

Melazoma
2004-06-27, 04:29
( ,_ゝ`)プッ
Not exactly sure why kj's kaomoji means... but I do wonder what "obisa" is--it's not "Doctor," and I know that much...

EDIT: To back myself up :)
"Isha" = Medical Doctor
"Hakase" = Doctor (Ph.d level, though often translated as "Professor")

Killerattacks
2004-06-27, 08:35
Could somebody enlighten me, what the suffix "-chin" means/implies?

I've seen/heard it in various animes like Godanner for example, but there was never an explanation. Even in the suffix thread here I couldn't find it IIRC.

Rhia
2004-06-27, 15:29
a. すみません、あなたはえいごがわかりますか。
b. いいえ、わたしはえいごがわかりません。
a. わたしはにほんごがわかります。
b. あなたはアメリカじんですか。
a. はい、わたしはアメリカじんです。
a. sumimasen, anata wa eigo ga wakarimasu ka./ exscuse me do you understand english?
b. iie, watashi wa eigo ga wakarimasen./ no i do not iunderstand english
a. watashi wa nihongo ga wakarimasu./ i understand japanese
b. anata wa amerika-jin desu ka./are you from america?
a. hai, watashi wa amerika-jin desu./ yes i am from america

a. すみません。にほんごがわかりますか。
b. すこし。
a. あなたはアメリカじんですか。
b. はい。えいごがわかりますか。
a. いいえ、わたしはえいごがわかりません。
a. sumimasen. nihongo ga wakarimasu ka./exscuse me do you understand japanese?
b. sukoshi./ a little bit
a. anata wa amerikajin desu ka./ are you american?
b. hai. eigo ga wakarimasu ka./ yes, do you understand english?
a. iie, watashi wa eigo ga wakarimasen./ no i dont understand english

a. おはようございます。いかがですか。
b. げんきです。おかげさまで。
a. ああ、にほんごがわかりますね。
b. はい、すこし。でも、まだじょうずじゃありません。
a. あなたはアメリカじんですか。
b. はい。
a. ohayou gozaimasu. ikaga desu ka./ good mornin, how are you?
b. genki desu. okage sama de./ i m fine thanks to you
a. aa, nihongo ga wakarimasu ne./ ahh you understand japanese
b. hai, sukoshi. demo, mada jouzu ja arimasen./ yes, a little bit but im not that good at it
a. anata wa amerikajin desu ka./ are you american?
b. hai./ yes

a. すみません。あなたはにほんじんですか。
b. はい、わたしはにほんじんです。あなたは?
a. わたしはアメリカじんです。
b. でも、あなたはにほんごがよくわかりますね。
a. ええ、すこし。でも、まだじょうずじゃありません。
b. いいえ、よくはなせます。
a. ありがとうございます。
a. sumimasen. anata wa nihon-jin desu ka./ excuse me are you japanese?
b. hai, watashi wa nihon-jin desu. anata wa?/ yes, yes im japanese and you?
a. watashi wa amerika-jin desu./ Iam american
b. demo, anata wa nihongo ga yoku wakarimasu ne./but you understand japanese right?
a. ee, sukoshi. demo, mada jouzu ja arimasen./ umm a little bit, but im not THAT good at it
b. iie, yoku hanasemasu./ no, you are very good at it
a. arigatou gozaimasu./ thank you

i think the translation is correct..there may be a few mistakes
i ve got plenty more convos and stuff if u want em?? :P

LynnieS
2004-06-28, 12:51
a. すみません、あなたはえいごがわかりますか。
b. いいえ、わたしはえいごがわかりません。
...

i think the translation is correct..there may be a few mistakes
They look alright from here. :) You can get by with fewer uses of the topic marker, or "は" (wa), however, as long as both of you know the thread of the conversation.

E.g.,

a. すみません、えいごがわかりますか。
b. いいえ、わかりません。


Sounds a little more natural, IMHO.


i ve got plenty more convos and stuff if u want em?? :P Cheers.

raikage
2004-06-28, 14:30
For what it's worth, I completely agree with LynnieS.

The removal makes the conversation flow naturally.

It's the difference between

"Excuse me, but would you happen to know English?"
"No, I don't know how to speak English."

"Excuse me, but would you happen to know English?"
"No, I don't."

There's nothing wrong with the first sentence, but it doesn't sound quite as natural as the second, IMO.

Lord Raiden
2004-06-28, 22:38
Quick question about reading Kanji. When you come across a name, will it have the abligatory honorific tied to the name, or is the honorific "assumed" based on the context of the sentance? I would guess the first, but I wasn't sure because I've seen names in sentences without the honorific. That's why I asked.

Melazoma
2004-06-28, 23:40
Quick question about reading Kanji. When you come across a name, will it have the abligatory honorific tied to the name, or is the honorific "assumed" based on the context of the sentance? I would guess the first, but I wasn't sure because I've seen names in sentences without the honorific. That's why I asked.
Honorifics are used when referring or speaking to a specific person, and is assign an honorific subjectively. Names in "sentences" may or may not contain because thw writer has no "personal" relationship to the person whose name is written, like in an newspaper article. Still, it's common to add "-shi" as a suffix to names written in such a manner. Examples can be Anno Hideki-shi, or Anno-shi; or for the alias of a person, the recently arrested Winny creator is dubbed "47-shi."

That's as far as I know anyways--it's almost certainly incomplete :heh:

Gaara.
2004-07-07, 11:35
I wanted to learn japanese so I wanted to ask you, for link or anything to Japanese alphabet with English .........whats that word.....for example

I - you hear it like - ai
y - you hear it like - why


something like that, I just wanted some help.....



-Thnx

phoenixfire92983
2004-07-07, 13:24
http://web-japan.org/kidsweb/index.html

I always thought this was a fun website. It teaches you some of the japanese alphabet, along with some sayings and greetings. It also talks about japanese culture and other cool stuff. If you really want to learn japanese though, you should get like a cd program or take a class. Its kinda hard to learn japanese without any instruction.

I'm currently using a cd program, but I plan to take a japanese class later this year. I think taking a class is the best thing cause you need to practice your pronunciation with other people. A cd program can't really help you too much in that department. You can also get more guidance in a class room also.

Thany
2004-07-07, 13:29
Another site (http://rivendell.fortunecity.com/hobgoblin/1026/ranma/kn_main.html) you might like :
I personally use it mainly to romanize or get japanese names of romanized stuffs :P

Lord Raiden
2004-07-07, 18:25
http://members.aol.com/writejapan/index.htm

This is one I really like a lot for helping to learn you Hiragana, Katakana, and some basic Kanji. It's best to learn them in order of Katakana, then Hiragana, then Kanji, each one being successively more difficult. Then once you get into your Kanji, learn them by grade level skills. Get yourself a Kanji tutor book that breaks down the Kanji by actually teaching grade years. IE 1st graders would learn these xx number of Kanji, 2nd graders would learn these, etc. I've got one that starts with 1st grade level Kanji and works all the way up through 10th grade Kanji. Not sure if there's still some for 11th and 12th grade, but mine does up to 10th grade and the book is freaking huge! So there's a lot to learn. ^_^;;

Ke0
2004-07-07, 20:04
Not exactly sure why kj's kaomoji means... but I do wonder what "obisa" is--it's not "Doctor," and I know that much...

EDIT: To back myself up :)
"Isha" = Medical Doctor
"Hakase" = Doctor (Ph.d level, though often translated as "Professor")

Bleh just came back to this thread, I meant to say Oisha-san, I have no clue why I said Obisha, anyways we use Oisha alot in Kansai I know there are alot of things different between the dialects, like you guys always say

"arigatou", in Kansai we say "maido ookini"

Granted I'm not from Kansai, nor am I Japanese (Filipino) I learned most of my Japanese in Kansai. So maybe I shouldn't give out help since it will most likely be different from the norm :heh:

Ke0
2004-07-07, 20:19
http://members.aol.com/writejapan/index.htm

This is one I really like a lot for helping to learn you Hiragana, Katakana, and some basic Kanji. It's best to learn them in order of Katakana, then Hiragana, then Kanji, each one being successively more difficult. Then once you get into your Kanji, learn them by grade level skills. Get yourself a Kanji tutor book that breaks down the Kanji by actually teaching grade years. IE 1st graders would learn these xx number of Kanji, 2nd graders would learn these, etc. I've got one that starts with 1st grade level Kanji and works all the way up through 10th grade Kanji. Not sure if there's still some for 11th and 12th grade, but mine does up to 10th grade and the book is freaking huge! So there's a lot to learn. ^_^;;

In most Japanese schools/home Hiragana is taught first, then katakana, which is taught along side Kanji, do like my exchange family did with me, every morning, they'd hang a Kanji symbol on the fridge with the meaning under it. (the Kanji had furigana above it for me to understand.)

Lord Raiden
2004-07-08, 07:56
Wow. Neat. Did that actually help you learn your Kanji faster?

Ayla
2004-07-09, 18:59
Ok I feel kinda stupid asking such a question but I'll go for it anyway.

I've seen some anime;s where they say something like iyata (or that's kinda how it sounds) for no. I was just curious in how you actually spell it and is there some reason for saying it like that other then iie..?

Also how do you say Happy birthday? I tooked it up and it was very long. Is there shorter ways of saying it?

Ayla
2004-07-13, 15:54
I know some of you speak Japanese so I figured I could ask this here.

I'm working in a hotel as a waitress and appearintly tomorrow morning we're having a Japanese tour in who don't speak much, if any, english (except maybe a tour guide? Not sure though) Anyway, last year we had french people and I had difficulty taking their orders so I though I'd try to learn some basic words to make it easier.

Anyway, some things I'd like help with are stuff like:
How would you like your eggs? Like, sunny side up, scrambled or overeasy (how would you say those?)
Also, how would you say bacon, ham, sausage, toast (white or whole wheat??)

Also, would it be considered rude if I was to try to say stuff in japanese to them if I maybe don't pronouce it 100% correct? I was thinking I'd just say "ohayou gozaimasu" but I don't want them tot hink I speak japanese and start talking to me in it haha. Or would would you say "I'm sorry, but I don't speak Japanese" or something along those lines....

sorry for the stupidness of this post, but it owuld be really helpful

Lexander
2004-07-13, 16:08
Yell out DOMO ARIGATO MISTER ROBATO. I hear they love it :P


Edit: I thought I shoud be serious ... There is quite a few threads on common Japanese phrases floating around. Just type in a search you should get enough matches. There is also a few native japanese speakers who'd be happy to share the knowledge.

Ayla
2004-07-13, 16:09
Yell out DOMO ARIGATO MISTER ROBATO. I hear they love it :P

lol yeah. Maybe I should have the song playing in the background too? ;)

Jinto
2004-07-13, 16:23
definitly... and some old school Alter Ego - Betty Ford *g*

edit: if you are not able to speak the japanese words correctly you might make serious mistakes, sometimes two words sound very similar like onee or oni, and to say oni-san instead of onee-san to your older sister for example would be really rude *g*

kj1980
2004-07-13, 17:13
I know some of you speak Japanese so I figured I could ask this here.

I'm working in a hotel as a waitress and appearintly tomorrow morning we're having a Japanese tour in who don't speak much, if any, english (except maybe a tour guide? Not sure though) Anyway, last year we had french people and I had difficulty taking their orders so I though I'd try to learn some basic words to make it easier.

Anyway, some things I'd like help with are stuff like:
How would you like your eggs? Like, sunny side up, scrambled or overeasy (how would you say those?)
Also, how would you say bacon, ham, sausage, toast (white or whole wheat??)

Also, would it be considered rude if I was to try to say stuff in japanese to them if I maybe don't pronouce it 100% correct? I was thinking I'd just say "ohayou gozaimasu" but I don't want them tot hink I speak japanese and start talking to me in it haha. Or would would you say "I'm sorry, but I don't speak Japanese" or something along those lines....

sorry for the stupidness of this post, but it owuld be really helpful


The phrases "How would you like your eggs?" and "Choices between bacon, ham, sausage, toast" are rarely asked in Japan, so they may actually give you strange looks if you say so.

I myself do not mind since I am rather proficient in English/American customs. However, when we went to Guam in high-school for a field trip, most of the other students were rather shy (and perhaps had some aura of irritation) because the waiter kept on asking them questions. Tourists are tired from going around town, or haven't had a good night's sleep due to jet-lag, so all they want to think is to eat their stuff...not to use their brain for a language they are not accustomed to.

But many Japanese people love their eggs sunny-side or scrambled so you can ask:

"Tamago wa medama-yaki (sunny-side) ka sukuranburu (scrambled) to dochira ni nasari masuka?"

As for bacon or ham:
"Be-kon (bacon) mata wa Hamu (ham) o erabe masuga, dochira ni nasari masuka?" (Usually though, most Japanese will choose ham)

As for bread:
"Pan (bread) wa mugi (wheat) ka shiro (white) o erabe masuga, dochira ni nasari masuka?" (Once again, most Japanese will choose white bread)


...and I dare you to give them a wine list...

TronDD
2004-07-13, 17:16
...and I dare you to give them a wine list...

I'm curious...what's the deal with that?

Lexander
2004-07-13, 17:29
I imagine they can't pernounce or comprehend it considering most of it is complex french/italian names.

Ayla
2004-07-13, 17:32
The phrases "How would you like your eggs?" and "Choices between bacon, ham, sausage, toast" are rarely asked in Japan, so they may actually give you strange looks if you say so.

I myself do not mind since I am rather proficient in English/American customs. However, when we went to Guam in high-school for a field trip, most of the other students were rather shy (and perhaps had some aura of irritation) because the waiter kept on asking them questions. Tourists are tired from going around town, or haven't had a good night's sleep due to jet-lag, so all they want to think is to eat their stuff...not to use their brain for a language they are not accustomed to.

But many Japanese people love their eggs sunny-side or scrambled so you can ask:

"Tamago wa medama-yaki (sunny-side) ka sukuranburu (scrambled) to dochira ni nasari masuka?"

As for bacon or ham:
"Be-kon (bacon) mata wa Hamu (ham) o erabe masuga, dochira ni nasari masuka?" (Usually though, most Japanese will choose ham)

As for bread:
"Pan (bread) wa mugi (wheat) ka shiro (white) o erabe masuga, dochira ni nasari masuka?" (Once again, most Japanese will choose white bread)


...and I dare you to give them a wine list...

Arigatou gozaimasu :) that helps a bunch

TronDD
2004-07-13, 17:36
I imagine they can't pernounce or comprehend it considering most of it is complex french/italian names.

Doesn't sound like they'll be able to pronounce or comprehend English, either.

Tell them "Neko no unko fume." That was used by a waitress in an anime so it must be useful. :)

Ayla
2004-07-13, 18:01
We only have 2 kinds of wine anyway lol ;)

Tron- Hmm..no thanks..somehow I have feeling that that's not appropriate..?

*hoping you ppl wouldn't just say something that really means something horrible*

kj1980
2004-07-13, 18:04
Doesn't sound like they'll be able to pronounce or comprehend English, either.

Tell them "Neko no unko fume." That was used by a waitress in an anime so it must be useful. :)

It'll be bad for the hotel as Japanese travel agencies are really conservative on their customers' feedback impressions.

There are two reasons why I do not recommend giving out a wine list.

A. If it is in French and Italian, chances are they will not know what is written - they have trouble understanding an English menu as is.

B. On the other hand, to those that know how to read the wine list (mainly women and executive-class men), they will order something just because of the price, and they go on babbling how red wine tastes better with this food, white wine etc. etc. as a know-it-all. In my experience, wine is drunk not because of how much it costs or how it tastes like with what food - but for the overall atmosphere of the restaurant. If I am tired from jet-lag, I would choose an inexpensive vin chaud over some USD$300 bottle of a 1974 Chateau Mouton-Rothschild. Why? Because I am tired and I want to relax!! I don't want to drink some expensive wine which does jack to my body which I won't be able to enjoy since my taste buds are numb from being tired.

Lexander
2004-07-13, 18:11
kj ... sounds to me like scotch or koniac would be more suitable for you after jet-lag :heh:

Anyway ... the best wine I've had was 400$ bottle. Second best not falling that far behind was a 2$ bottle.

From personal experience I'd say the usual 30 - 120 $ don't taste any better than some of the under 10$ wines I've found deals on ... some people look at the age and price and something snobbish triggers a reaction that makes them says "wow that was excellent wine" ... when I sit there and think ... "are we drinking the same thing?"

TronDD
2004-07-13, 18:25
Tron- Hmm..no thanks..somehow I have feeling that that's not appropriate..?

No it isn't. Don't listen to me. :)

Someone had to try to steer you wrong. Might as well have been me. At least I wouldn't try to convince you it was a legit statement for work.