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AOforever1
2006-09-30, 12:06
Hey guys, I was just wondering if anybody here had experience with refusing packages from Amazon.com using super saver shipping (USPS). Will the post office allow me to refuse the package? I've always trusted the brown truck (UPS), but this time I was trying to get the best bang for the buck on a product.

AnimeFangirl
2006-09-30, 13:59
Refusing? Why would you want to refuse packages?

AOforever1
2006-09-30, 14:10
Refusing? Why would you want to refuse packages?
I want a full refund on my purchase without a charge for shipping.

Shakugan no Shana
2006-09-30, 14:19
I want a full refund on my purchase without a charge for shipping.
Where do you live, state I mean. I did that once, I wasn't charged for the shipping.

xris
2006-09-30, 14:21
I want a full refund on my purchase without a charge for shipping.
In that case it has nothing to do with your Postal Service. They have been paid to deliver a package and that's what they are legally contracted to do.

You need to contact Amazon and ask them what the procedure is to return the goods. I've never tried this so I do not know what this entails but it may be that you will be required to pay the postage (you may find that in placing the order you agreeded to such terms already).

Anyway, for my Amazon.co.uk orders, the following is part of the the invoice.

Thinking of returning an item?

Our Return Support Centre (www.amazon.co.uk/returns-support) will guide you through our Returns Policy and provide you with a printable personalised return label. Please have your order number ready (you can find it next to your order summary, above). This Returns Policy does not affect your statutory rights

NightWish
2006-09-30, 14:32
Anyway, for my Amazon.co.uk orders, the following is part of the the invoice.
Amazon.com have something very similar (http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=15015711), which covers shipping, etc. if you deal with it in 30 days, don't open it and they are at fault.

AOforever1
2006-09-30, 15:03
@Xris & Nightwish

So the USPS does not offer things such as refusing packages like the UPS?
I've refused packages before instead of RMA'ing them, but all done with the UPS...

I assume worse case is, I'll bring the package to my nearest post office and refuse the package, if not, slap my RMA label on and send it back.

NightWish
2006-09-30, 15:19
So the USPS does not offer things such as refusing packages like the UPS?We're not in the US, so don't use USPS directly. I'm sure some of my packages have been handled by USPS for some of the time, but the Royal Mail deliver the final thing to my door.

As for refusing... I don't think so. Mainly because if you don't sign for something how do they know not to leave it in your mail box? USPS (like Royal Mail) do have a return-to-sender procedure, but from what I've read you need to have not opened the letter, and the sender needs to have pre-paid for forwarding and/or return...It is debatable if they would have done this. In the UK if I want to reject something already delivered I can put it back in a post box with a line through the address and a comment like "not at this address" or "return to sender" -- in some cases it will be returned, depends on the style of postage though. Business mailshots always have to have a return address here (by law I believe), might be similar in the US, though this probably doesn't apply to goods you've actually asked for... so again I think you're better off using the proper RMA.

If you ordered it by mistake you can sometimes get all your money back, if not bad luck I guess.

AOforever1
2006-09-30, 15:22
We're not in the US, so don't use USPS directly. I'm sure some of my packages have been handled by USPS for some of the time, but the Royal Mail deliver the final thing to my door.

As for refusing... I don't think so. Mainly because if you don't sign for something how do they know not to leave it in your mail box? USPS (like Royal Mail) do have a return-to-sender procedure, but from what I've read you need to have not opened the letter, and the sender needs to have pre-paid for forwarding and/or return...It is debatable if they would have done this. In the UK if I want to reject something already delivered I can put it back in a post box with a line through the address and a comment like "not at this address" or "return to sender" -- in some cases it will be returned, depends on the style of postage though. Business mailshots always have to have a return address here (by law I believe), might be similar in the US, though this probably doesn't apply to goods you've actually asked for... so again I think you're better off using the proper RMA.

If you ordered it by mistake you can sometimes get all your money back, if not bad luck I guess.
The signature from UPS explains it then. I'll be RMAing the package.

Sazelyt
2006-10-01, 00:33
@Xris & Nightwish

So the USPS does not offer things such as refusing packages like the UPS?
I've refused packages before instead of RMA'ing them, but all done with the UPS...

I assume worse case is, I'll bring the package to my nearest post office and refuse the package, if not, slap my RMA label on and send it back.It seems that both Amazon and USPS support refusing the package (unless they updated their policies):

from Amazon (an email response from Amazon for a specific order, hence, it is possible this may not be valid for every shipment): You may also refuse this shipment when it arrives. Refusing the shipment allows you to return the unopened box without having to pay
for return shipping.

If the package is delivered by mail and you are not present when it is delivered, you may write "Refused--return to sender" on the box and leave it for your postal carrier to pick up. from USPS: What are the mail refusal options?

Not everyone accepts every piece of mail thatís delivered to their home, whether itís unsolicited advertising or other pieces. When that happens, postal standards offer mail refusal options.

*Domestic Mail Manual D042.1.2 and 1.3 provide two instances where mail can be refused ó when itís offered for delivery, or, after delivery, you may mark ďRefusedĒ and return it unopened within a reasonable time.
*If a mailpiece has been opened, even if itís been resealed, it canít be marked ďRefusedĒ and returned. If someone wants to return that mailpiece to the sender, they have to put it in a new envelope or wrapper with a correct address and new postage.
*Thereís some mail that canít be refused after itís been delivered. Once again, two groups fit this category ó
o Pieces sent as Registered, Insured, Certified, Collect on Delivery (COD), and Return Receipt for merchandise mail.
o Response mail to a sales promotion, solicitation, announcement, or other advertisement that was not refused when offered to the recipient.
*Anyone who wants to reduce the amount of marketing mail they receive may write to the Direct Marketing Association Preference Service, which is independent of the Postal Service, and let them know they donít want to receive marketing mail. In addition, the three major credit-reporting services (Equifax, Experian & TransUnion) also offer a name removal option.I think it should be ok with USPS, but, if I were you, I would contact Amazon to verify whether they would accept the package without any payment (it might depend on the type of the item you bought or store you bought) or not.

Aoie_Emesai
2006-10-01, 01:41
For what reasons would have to refure it in the first place? Was it an error or plain out straight you dont want it?

Is that allowed, refusing a product just because you found a cheaper version of it some place else?

AOforever1
2006-10-01, 02:04
For what reasons would have to refure it in the first place? Was it an error or plain out straight you dont want it?

Is that allowed, refusing a product just because you found a cheaper version of it some place else?
I actually read some more reviews about the product (a logitech G7 mouse), and it made me think twice about my purchase. I was really on edge when I brought the mouse; since it's such a good deal now with the rebate. If anybody is interested, the battery life for the G7 just plain sucks; which is unacceptable for a hardcore FPS gamer, or even when I'm working on photoshop docs for work.

Sazelyt
2006-10-01, 02:08
Is that allowed, refusing a product just because you found a cheaper version of it some place else?That is just returning the item - without opening the package, but, also, without the obligation to pay for the shipping charges (equals to driving your car to a store and returning the item, and it is allowed in I guess all of the stores in US, unless the item is bought as a non-returnable item).

NightWish
2006-10-01, 05:51
You may also refuse this shipment when it arrives. Refusing the shipment allows you to return the unopened box without having to pay
for return shipping.

If the package is delivered by mail and you are not present when it is delivered, you may write "Refused--return to sender" on the box and leave it for your postal carrier to pick up.Amazon.co.uk says something very similar on their site, I could also find that on some sub-shops, but no where on the main Amazon site -- I guess you actually have to read all the emails they send to get the full picture. :heh:

Sazelyt
2006-10-01, 10:58
Amazon.co.uk says something very similar on their site, I could also find that on some sub-shops, but no where on the main Amazon site -- I guess you actually have to read all the emails they send to get the full picture. :heh:They cannot give the easy way out to customers, otherwise, people would start exploiting that (mainly because the delivery time is around 1-2 weeks for free shipping, the customers would easily find a cheaper item or change their minds during that period).

AOforever1
2006-10-01, 13:05
I just got an email reply from Amazon. I was told, I would write, "Refused - Return package to sender". So I hope that answers all of our questions :D

ImperialPanda
2006-10-01, 15:22
Either that or you can call USPS and tell them you want to refuse shipment on item XXXX <-- tracking number.

That way it will be routed back from the item's current location instead of waiting for it to arrive on your doorstep.

Works with fedex and ups at any rate. So USPS should be the same.

AOforever1
2006-10-01, 16:30
Either that or you can call USPS and tell them you want to refuse shipment on item XXXX <-- tracking number.

That way it will be routed back from the item's current location instead of waiting for it to arrive on your doorstep.

Works with fedex and ups at any rate. So USPS should be the same.
That sounds nice! Can anybody confirm this finding?