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kj1980
2003-11-09, 12:09
This is the thread dedicated for the discussion of the Japanese otaku lingo thread (sticky) (http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=29911) at the top of this forum.

Srin Tuar
2006-03-28, 19:18
i found this interesting as well:

http://matthew.animeblogger.net/archives/2006/03/26/otaku_expressions_random_selection.php

tsuraramai
2006-04-22, 15:21
Interesting! So while internet slang has seen "hentai" appropriated into the English language as a loanword to mean "erotic images, usually manga style", it's essentially a mistranslation caused by the fact that pornography is such a taboo subject that only unpaid amateurs were able to try their hand at the translation of the lingo. Of course, "hentai" is now one of those words that's made its way into the English language to mean something other than what it originally did in its other language - it's like how "anime" in Japan simply means "animation", but in English the word specifically refers to Japanese animation.

Also, what does "moe" mean?

A lot of US anime-fan lingo is misused...

not just "hentai"...

one of the more perplexing:

"yaoi" & "shounen ai"

The first term began in Japan to refer specifically to gay PWP doujinshi porn. The second was to refer to a particular early genre of angsty forbidden love stories between school-aged boys. Both aren't really all that widely used, and the second's actually taken on pedophilic connotations ("boy lovers" use it to refer to pederasty).

Meanwhile, in the US, fans use "yaoi" for EVERYTHING remotely homosexual: story with no sex at all, slash fanfiction, fanfiction where two boys kiss, a music video where two guys touch each others' faces, an action that's particularly "Gay" ("zomg, that's so yaoi!"), the ACTION of doing something gay ("will yaoi for money" signs), etc...

A few fans will shout at you for calling something with no sex "yaoi" and will say it's, instead, "shounen ai".

And what's all this called in Japan?

"Boys Love"... in ENGLISH ^^;;;

So the english-speaking fans are all talking about it Japanese (incorrectly)... while the term used in Japan is already in English ^^;

Kind of like when you get fanboys telling you all about their favorite anime "Onegai Sensei", when the actual title is in english to begin with ^^;;

Simply by BEING japanese, some words are instantly attractive and gain wide (often improper) usage simply because, at the time they entered the lexicon, no one quite knew how to use them.

It happens a lot. But it happens a lot in reverse too :) You should see what crimes against english pass for legitimate loanwords in Japanese. Or even worse, what some of the kids into rap and r&b think of as legitimate "street lingo" ^_^

But hey, language is always changing. Today's mistake is tomorrow's dictionary entry.

As for "moe", it's is that special something that makes youthful, adorable characters so gulldarned attractive. Some insist that it's not sexual or fetishistic at all, that it's just the urge to protect someone smaller and sweeter than you are. Others will equate it to lolicon.

But "moe" is the heart and soul of the current anime industry, especially in Akihabara. Google "moe" and "moe zangyou" for a good zillion articles on the subject :)

kj1980
2006-04-24, 04:52
Does the full mean of M.O.E is...
M.agnificient
O.utrageous
E.ntertaining

:confused:

That's the abbreviation of the entertainment company that makes moe~ anime.

Okay... this isn't exactly otaku slang, it's more 9 year old girl slang...

But I'd still like to know exactly what an "ikemen" is? the closest thing I think is just some "hot guy".

Also... do the japanese otaku have any slang word for western anime fans? you know, something really insulting that they only call us when we aren't looking :)? Like "nise-taku" or something?

1. bingo

2. we just refer to you guys as 外人ヲタ (foreigner otakus)

Dagger
2006-04-24, 10:31
Expect a very broad answer:

Moe

Moe can be any or a combo of things listed by Sushi-Y in post 35 (http://forums.animesuki.com/showpost.php?p=512688&postcount=35).
Moe is the backbone of the multibillion yen otaku industry.
Moe is what NoSanninWa "got" all of a sudden back in November 2004 (http://forums.animesuki.com/showpost.php?p=381351&postcount=548) (reading that with post 549 (http://forums.animesuki.com/showpost.php?p=381385&postcount=549) and post 550 (http://forums.animesuki.com/showpost.php?p=381436&postcount=550) would make a really good 4-koma manga!!)
Moe is something that can't be described, it's something that you know you are moe~d when it hits you.
When moe warms your heart and melts your brain out of uber-moe~ness, you are officially considered to be an otaku in my eyes (that's saying a lot).
Your moe may not necessarily be my moe.
I never understood moe until I watched the first episode of Ichigo Mashimaro. I didn't find the show that interesting until I got to one of the scenes near the end, when you see the three girls sleeping. All of a sudden I was hit with incredible feelings of warmth & adoration (and the inexplicable desire to protect them) that almost made me want to cry.

.... Yeah, moe sounds kind of crazy when you try to describe it with words. :heh: I can really relate to NoSanninWa's post, except that in my case it was a different character(s) who inspired that feeling.

kj1980
2006-04-24, 13:30
@KJ1980
i dont know if it is otaku lingo or just your style but what is "wwww" at the end of your post ?
is it some kind of signature for you ?



(kj1980 sorry for asking if it rude for me to ask this kind of question :innocent: )

a VIPPER way of saying (warai), which in English would be similar to LOL. The more w's, the more I'm laughing. And before you ask, I'm not explaining what a VIPPER is.

DaFool
2006-05-10, 09:59
Well considering we haven't actually been in a Japanese studio nor any of its Korean outsourcers, that's pretty well researched.

For western animation at least:
Storyboard and model designs (this is where episode director fits in) ->Layout (Layout director) -> Key Animation (Animation Director who's primary concern is movement according to Storyboard and X-sheet) -> Clean-up (separate department with its own director ) -> In-between (also separate department)

You could outsource pretty much anything after the Pre-prod (first step), and even send each department to a different studio if they like.

Hmm, "Layout Sakkan" and "2nd Key" animation...that's really interesting. Well, usually only Japanese animation has all the detailed shadows and all. For one thing, they seem to have more specialist mechanical directors .

wao
2006-05-11, 23:56
I don't have any clips/gifs offhand, but if you've seen enough anime you've probably seen the Gainax bounce: i.e. when a (usually well-endowed) girl jumps or does something and her boobs bounce. Apparently it started off with Gainax. I think there was a bit of it in Daicon IV which was made by Gainax founders before Gainax was formed.

As for the animation production process, you might have already been to AIC's guide (http://www.aicanime.com/introanime/index.html) on how anime is produced in general, particularly this (http://www.aicanime.com/introanime/process07.html) page. (Note how the colour designer is actually in pre-production. An interesting case is Mushishi where there was a separate colour designer for each episode because each ep had a "Theme Colour". Seems like they planned the storyboards and colours and so on WAY ahead of time.)

For sakugakantoku, perhaps "Key Animation Supervisor" would be a more fitting title? That is what they used in Jin-Roh. But it's deifnitely not "animation coordinator" (that would be closer to, say, 制作進行 which is something I still don't know how to translate nicely) And I will stab you if you say "Art supervisor" because when you say "Art" in anime credits it's easy to get mixed up with the background art.

DaFool: I think the biggest difference is that in Western animation the animation director is more concerned with the movement while in anime it's more of the drawings. After all, the focus is very different in both, and like you pointed out Japanese animation has much more detailed designs with shadows and such. I should think that the animation director in anime also looks at the timesheet though, so that basic timing is still there.

There's a lot I"m really confused about anyway - a lot of this could be quite mistaken - so someday I hope I can go to Japan and visit a studio and ask them once and for all...

Soluzar
2006-05-12, 04:21
What is the Gainax Bounce?

In addition to the other comment, I've heard American anime fans sardonically refer to the picture artifacts caused by bad telecine as the "GAINAX Bounce", although that was done in conscious awareness of the more usual definition of the term. It's not at all hard to notice the effect of the picture seeming to bounce up and down in their older releases.

xris
2006-06-14, 09:03
What does moe really mean? I've heard it has different connotations, but what does it REALLY mean?
If you read (or search) this thread, you will see it's not really possible to give an exact answer since it means different things to different people.
Expect a very broad answer:

Moe

Moe can be any or a combo of things listed by Sushi-Y in post 35 (http://forums.animesuki.com/showpost.php?p=512688&postcount=35).
Moe is the backbone of the multibillion yen otaku industry.
Moe is what NoSanninWa "got" all of a sudden back in November 2004 (http://forums.animesuki.com/showpost.php?p=381351&postcount=548) (reading that with post 549 (http://forums.animesuki.com/showpost.php?p=381385&postcount=549) and post 550 (http://forums.animesuki.com/showpost.php?p=381436&postcount=550) would make a really good 4-koma manga!!)
Moe is something that can't be described, it's something that you know you are moe~d when it hits you.
When moe warms your heart and melts your brain out of uber-moe~ness, you are officially considered to be an otaku in my eyes (that's saying a lot).
Your moe may not necessarily be my moe.

LytHka
2006-08-05, 06:43
"Otaku" has a perfectly valid English translation: "Fanatic".

Example: People that are into certain music groups, bands or artists and buy a lot of their merchandise are actually otaku. But they're labeled as fanatics (or less severely as "fans") in the West. They aren't labeled as otaku, because "otaku" in the West is refering exclusively to fans of japanese animation and comics, while in Japan, you are otaku if you're passionate about practically any kind of hobby, as long as you adjust your lifestyle/finances to it.

kj1980
2006-08-18, 14:02
A friend of mine in Japan has told me that lately the term "DEEP" is being used to refer to a certain class of otaku that are heavily into moe stuff.

An example he gave is that for SF anime otaku, the great "trinity" is Yamato/Gundam/Evangelion, while for a DEEP, it is something more like Doremi/Nadesico/Mai-HIME. ....orz

I was wondering if kj1980 or another native fan could elaborate on this or comment?
:heh:

See example above regarding Onee-chan. Knowing these things are considered "DEEP" by normal people.

relentlessflame
2006-09-05, 14:14
Supposedly, the ゼロの使い魔's light novel sold over 1.25 million copies. Assuming most of the sales were in Japan, and that noone bought multiple copies for themselves, that would mean that 1 in 200 people in Japan got a copy. If thats not a mainstream social phonemenon, then the otaku population must be very large and have significant purchasing power.I'm assuming that sales figure would actually be for all 8 light novels released so far, which'd put the per volume sales at around 156,000 each. Still great, of course, and beyond the "inner" otaku circle by most estimates.

And as usual, thanks to kj1980 and all the participants for this very useful thread.

kj1980
2006-09-05, 22:24
Well, yes, but is there a term for the romance between those osananajimi?

Surprisingly....no. It's just called osananajimi no kankei, which is literally "childhood friend relationship." Either that, or it's also called an oyakusoku, which is a slang term for "cliché" (as with other typical cliché like guy falling down grabbing the girl's breasts, etc. etc.).

In either case, even if there were a word that could be born, there aren't that many abbreviations that clicks for and osananajimi romance. Osana-roma? Nah, too corny. Nope, as of now there doesn't seem to be anything that describes that relationship other than the literal wording itself.


And as everyone might've noticed, I have clipped out posts that do not fall under providing info on Japanese Otaku Lingo - six pages of material cut down into three.

Nanatuha
2006-09-06, 08:07
light novel
These novels are initially serialized on a monthly magazine (just like mangas are initially serialized in a weekly/monthly comic magazine).

It may cause a misunderstanding. Not ALL light novels are serialized on a magazine.
Long piece is usually newly written. (Usually that's the story to be made to a anime.) Short piece is published as a book after be serialized on those magazine once like kj1980 said. There are a lot of series that have both, too, but the ratio of unserialized ones is probably higher than serialized one's in whole light novel published.

solomon
2006-09-27, 22:44
nice work on the lexicon kj190. However, i must give major kudos to wao for the lenghty info on sakuga. Ive long been an animation buff/aspiring artist but the entire true nature of the japanese animation process was always a true mystery. The proprietor of Anipages.net who keeps an eye out for animation worth of praise in anime, gave some good info but still nothing as detailed an informative as wao did.
As for dai-ni genga ive only seen it in movies high end ovas and spectacularly animated tv shows like Planetes, Kamichu and Eureka Seven to name a few. The hypothesis wao gives is valid but i immedietly think that the assignment of animation shots would be broken down amongst more and more animators (genga-sha?) especialy for very fluid shows that would need the extra attention

bayoab
2006-10-05, 08:58
And Toku is short for Tokusatsu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tokusatsu).

Okita Souji
2006-10-06, 03:56
Found this on youtube. Hosted by Shoko Nakagawa. This show explains a bit of otaku lingo and includes types of otaku.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3R3vsMxhzus

Since my Japanese isn't very good, what's the reason for otaku to be spelled ヲタク instead of オタク?

Sushi-Y
2006-10-06, 16:38
Found this on youtube. Hosted by Shoko Nakagawa. This show explains a bit of otaku lingo and includes types of otaku.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3R3vsMxhzus
ワロタw :heh:

Since my Japanese isn't very good, what's the reason for otaku to be spelled ヲタク instead of オタク?
Because オタク has that traditional, negative image associated to it. Whereas modern otaku-culture has become much more mainstream and well-known. So to seperate the "old" otaku image from the "new" otaku image, they changed its spelling from オタク to ヲタク (pronounced pretty much the same way).

It's all the same if you ask me though. ^^;

Furudanuki
2007-01-26, 22:54
A question for those who would know about such things...

The term "Meganekko" refers to a girl who wears glasses. Is there a similar term used to describe a girl who habitually wears traditional Japanese clothing? For example, someone like Masako in Ghost Hunt.

Anime Online
2007-02-02, 02:45
Interestingly, the AV is made closely to the original which makes it very funny. It's like watching a badly-written skit, with ugly looking guys pretending to be teenagers. Like I said, otakus are suckers - they'll spend cash on a whim. Besides, Hahiru's DVD sold out in Akiba, and the AV actress Kousaka Yuri even held an autograph session there! www


Just to add, to those who were thinking, "How bad can it be?", here (http://www.darkmirage.com/2006/12/06/screencaps-from-suzumiya-hahiru/) is a (mostly work safe) commentary with selective screenshots on the Hahiru's DVD.

piccu
2007-02-02, 20:44
I have a question:
Is there a specific term for male "tsundere" characters like Wolfram in Kyou Kara Maou? As far as I know tsundere is only used to describe female characters.

wao
2007-02-02, 21:04
Actually to my knowledge even female anime fans/fujoshi/whatever call males like that tsundere as well. I've seen it around.

Question
2007-02-08, 12:01
Is it true that tsundere is pronounced as TSUN-DAY-RAY?

wao
2007-02-09, 00:33
Yeah, something like that... Tsun-day-ray. Except you don't lengthen the day or the ray.

Sushi-Y
2007-02-18, 23:04
Is it true that tsundere is pronounced as TSUN-DAY-RAY?
Kind of. More emphasis is placed on "tsun" though, so the "dere" part isn't as pronounced ("dere" sounds like "day-lay" pronounced fast).

luna621
2007-02-24, 23:26
Anyone know what 蛍ピン (keipin) means? This is the sentence I found it in: 全頁蛍ピン入りフルカラーにて酒池肉林がくり広げんられる!! (zenpeiji keipin iri FULL COLOR nite shucchinikurin ga kurihirokenrareru). Thank you!

wao
2007-02-25, 06:54
蛍ピン = 蛍光ピンク = flourescent pink

If I'm not wrong.

luna621
2007-02-25, 08:39
Thanks wao! Is it like some kind of fetish like "moe"? What would that sentence translate to? Something like: And there's a whole page that can open out to a full color sumptuous flourescent pink feast!!

wao
2007-02-25, 10:26
I'm not really sure, but my guess is that it's talking about the printing of a book and there'll be sumptuous full colour printing as well as... flourescent pink? I honestly don't know if it's some sort of fetish, but I sure as heck hope the text in that book isn't flourescent pink...

luna621
2007-02-25, 22:10
Haha, thanks!

Mr Chow
2007-04-12, 22:48
Thank you for clearing up alot of misconceptions that I had in my misunderstandings of all things anime, and why characters are drawn in such a way, though I still thought they looked damn too sexy while kicking some poor saps ass!! Very lengthy in explanation but I wish my understanding of your language was better, but none the less thank you and I wish you all the best for the future.

Ka kite

Mecha_Trueno
2007-04-13, 00:43
is there such a term for meganeko+big breasts? is it actually a type or anything? it must be, coz one thing i've noticed thats very common in a lot of anime series is that the glasses girl, very often, has the biggest boobs out of the female cast.

harukamae
2007-04-13, 23:26
I have a question:
Is there a specific term for male "tsundere" characters like Wolfram in Kyou Kara Maou? As far as I know tsundere is only used to describe female characters.

I was wondering that too. I was on Mixi and typed in Tsundere and came across a community of 8,000+ fans of male tsundere (http://mixi.jp/view_community.pl?id=919436), so yeah, as was said before, it seems they're just called male tsunderes (and I adore them!) ^-^

Thanks, kj and wao and all for posting this thread, it really helps clear a lot of things up. I don't know if this is the appropriate thread, but since it does seem closely linked with otaku culture, can someone post info about the Doujin Circles, better explain what they are, and that culture? Is it more often just fan works and the original stuff is rare? It really seems like something that's more supported in Japan than abroad, to see groups like 07th Expansion and TYPE-MOON see such success.

Dandruff
2007-04-19, 14:28
Okay, I gotta know, but 'gar' some new slang term or something? Is it supposed to be like the "male equivalent" to 'moe'? I need all the clarification with this one since it's driving me nuts xD

niwasatou
2007-04-19, 14:45
4channer wanted to say that he's "so gay for Archer", but mistyped it as "gar". That's it, as far as I know. ;)

Hahiru
2007-05-15, 15:31
Hope this is the right thread to ask this...

I got an account on nico nico douga recently. For the most part I don't understand anything that flashes across since my Japanese is minimal, but occasionally I see the word 'zip' appear and also 'sugeee' (some form of sugoi=cool?). Does the word 'zip' have some meaning in otakudom?

Also, what does having multiple hiragana 'a' stringed together mean?

Thanks.

wao
2007-05-17, 15:09
If you see something ilke zipでくれ or something along those lines, that means "give this in a zip file" - usually referring to the pictures (if its one of those videos full of still pictures that are played for a few seconds) or music (if it's got good music or something).

As for sugee (すげええええ or すげーーー etc.) that is indeed "sugoi", just a more informal way of saying it I think. I don't know what sort of transformation/conjugation/whatever-the-heck it's called, but it's just like how "osoi" (late) becomes "osee", "dasai" (uncool) becomes "dasee", "uzai/urusai" becomes "uzee/urusee", "kowai" becomes "koeee" (you see this a lot on some vids there.)

Having multiple hiragana a is, uh, what you'd get if you put lots of English "a"s together - aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa. Same thing really.

I love niconico douga! One of the things you'll see there is this vocabulary "弾幕" - don't ask me about the etymology of the word, probably has something to do with them Touhou games or something - which, if I am not mistaken, refers to comment spam all in one go at some particular point such that the ocmments might even fill the entire screen. Those "classic" favourites with tons of comments would have that (like Let's Go! Onmyouji, that Okkusenman! thing, Konaaaaaaayukiiiiii, Marisa wa taihen na mono wo nusundekimashita etc. etc.)

Having those comments appear as you watch the show is one of the best bits about niconico, but the sad thing is if you're watching a sequence-story sort o thing it can be easily abused (people can spoil you early on; of cousre you can choose not to see the comments but then you miss out on enjoying other peoples' reactions).

Hahiru
2007-05-20, 18:01
Thanks for answering, wao! I guess the answers to my questions were much more obvious than I thought. :heh: I very much enjoy Nico Nico Douga too. It's part of my daily ritual to browse it for about an hour before I go to bed.

I never found Let's Go! Onmyouji to be that funny .. not familiar with song or the game source materials. :confused:

I wish there were more coverage of street akiba acts. Found this AKB48-like gem (http://www.nicovideo.jp/watch/sm297912) the other day. They look quite polished other than the lack of mics for everyone. wwwww :p Wish I knew what ppl were writing about them.

Kaoru Chujo
2007-05-22, 23:01
...I wish there were more coverage of street akiba acts. Found this AKB48-like gem (http://www.nicovideo.jp/watch/sm297912) the other day. They look quite polished other than the lack of mics for everyone. wwwww :p Wish I knew what ppl were writing about them.Thanks for that great little street moment. They're better than some professionals, it seems to me. The reaction was mixed, but lots of people said they sang well: pretty good, not bad, good singing, cute, ugly, the crowd was awful, is that Hokkaido?, I'm looking for the zettai ryouiki, is that a new idol unit?, they'd do better if they took their clothes off, they sing really well, they're not cute, they have sexy eyes, like a school festival performance, they should try for a more adult look, etc., etc.

kj1980
2007-06-22, 13:43
Well I guess that cleans things up a bit. If you guys want to discuss, help yourselves.

Ritzia
2007-06-22, 14:28
Yaoi = boys love, not always a hentai!

Yuri = girl's love, also not usually a hentai

Hentai = pervertedness, sexual innuendo, nasty (to but it bluntly) anime sex.

Moe/kawaii = Moe refers to the cute, adorable characters, usually with big eyes, and say "nyo?" or "gaoooo!" n' stuff.... but many otaku refer to that as kawaii (cute)

There are many more, but I'de prefer not to list some....x_x

HashiriyaR32
2007-06-25, 17:00
ryUmJjgLTK4

Keep that stuff away from my GDB!

Nice CTR, BTW.

Sister Princess
2007-06-27, 17:15
When did ネタ (neta) became widely used?

What exactly is xxx自重? (xxx refers to a person at most of the time, but it can refer to objects too)

wao
2007-06-28, 07:44
Correct me if I"m wrong (I'm not Japanese in the least bit) but from what I understand, 自重 seems to imply this complex feeling on a number of levels... the very basic meaning is "please restrain yourself" (something like 自粛 but with more of a "shut up"/"I will shut up" type of connotation?). It can be used for situations when there's someone going overboard or overacting or something like that and then you'd say xxx自重.

But in a wider and possibly the more commonly used sense of the word, it - as I understand it - refers to something being too much of something (in a good or bad sense) and asking the "thing" to tone it down. It can be used jokingly.
For example if you hear someone saying ... I dunno, "ぴょん" or something a lot in one episode, you'd get some people saying "ぴょん自重してwww" or something along those lines. The example I can think of easily are those Yugioh: The Abridged episodes subbed in Japanese on niconico; when Bandit Keith and his "IN AMERICA" showed up a lot everyone'd be jokingly going "in America 自重www" or something. The last time I remember, anyway.

...or perhaps you actually knew all of this and wanted a more precise definition, or perhaps I have been misunderstanding it all this while. :eyespin: I'd like to hear from anyone who knows, too (also regarding ネタ).

SeijiSensei
2007-06-28, 08:30
Can someone confirm my understanding of the prefix "bi-" in "bishounen" and "bishoujo?" I had often seen the word "bishounen" used to refer to the types of male characters seen in shows like Saiunkoku Monogatari or yaoi-themed shows like Gravitation. Not knowing Japanese I thought it was imported from English to mean "bisexual." Given how these men are drawn, or the themes of the shows, it wasn't hard to imagine that these men swung both ways. When I later saw "bishoujo" applied to moe~ girls who typically all seem heterosexual, I realized I had misinterpreted "bi." Elsewhere I've seen it defined as "pretty," so a bishounen is a "pretty boy," and a bishoujo is a "pretty girl." Is that the correct meaning?

Robotnik
2007-06-28, 08:54
Can someone confirm my understanding of the prefix "bi-" in "bishounen" and "bishoujo?" I had often seen the word "bishounen" used to refer to the types of male characters seen in shows like Saiunkoku Monogatari or yaoi-themed shows like Gravitation. Not knowing Japanese I thought it was imported from English to mean "bisexual." Given how these men are drawn, or the themes of the shows, it wasn't hard to imagine that these men swung both ways. When I later saw "bishoujo" applied to moe~ girls who typically all seem heterosexual, I realized I had misinterpreted "bi." Elsewhere I've seen it defined as "pretty," so a bishounen is a "pretty boy," and a bishoujo is a "pretty girl." Is that the correct meaning?

The words bishonen and bishojo come from "Bijin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bijin)" meaning a "beautiful person"

kj1980
2007-06-29, 06:13
The words bishonen and bishojo come from "Bijin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bijin)" meaning a "beautiful person"

Or more simply, the word "bi" is written with the kanji 美 (beautiful / pretty).

Bishounen written in kanji is 美少年 where
美 = beauty
少年 = young boy

Bishoujo writte in kanji is 美少女 where
美 = beauty
少女 = young girl

SeijiSensei
2007-06-29, 10:07
Thanks to you both!

Question
2007-07-06, 13:26
How does one pronounce Yaoi?

kj1980
2007-07-09, 16:39
How does one pronounce Yaoi?

Japanese is easy if you just follow these simple rules:

1. All vowels are pronounced the same way

あ (A) - "ah" (like "cheetah")
い (I) - "ee" (like pronouncing the English alphabet "E", like the "i" part of the word "igloo")
う (U) - "ooh" (like Winnie the "Pooh")
え (E) - "eh" (like the dismissive exclamation "meh")
お (O) - "oh" (like pronouncing the English alphabet "O", like the "o" part of the word "orbit")


2. Each consonant is tied with a vowel, and that makes one syllable aka the basic gojuon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goj%C5%ABon)

A-KA-SA-TA-NA-HA-MA-YA-RA-WA
I-KI-SHI-CHI-NI-HI-MI-RI
U-KU-SU-TSU-NU-FU-MU-YU-RU
E-KE-SE-TE-NE-HE-ME-RE
O-KO-SO-TO-NO-HO-MO-YO-RO-WO
N

each word sounds as: "consonant + the vowel pronounciation written above"



So long as you get rid of the English consonant centric style that is stuck in your head, many Japanese words will be easy for you to pronounce.


So the answer to your question is yah-oh-ee


Now practice pronouncing the following words using the info that you just learned (and to simplify, I'll divide the first five into syllables so you get the hang of it):

otaku = o/ta/ku
oniichan = o/ni/i/cha/n
moe = mo/e
tsundere = tsu/n/de/re
meganekko = me/ga/ne/kko
ranobe
imouto
shimapan
kyonyuu
mukuchikei
meidosan

niwasatou
2007-07-11, 11:08
It really does have advantages to be German and have it as your mother language. :heh:
Just like French people don't have to wonder about pronouncing "anime".. :)

cyth
2007-07-12, 10:19
It really does have advantages to be German and have it as your mother language. :heh:I guess you could call it an advantage, although german fangirls screaming "Sasuke-kün~" scared me for life. :heh:

niwasatou
2007-07-12, 10:29
Fangirls are scary, regardless of which language they're screaming in.. :p

AVPlaya
2007-07-17, 00:56
Hey, KJ1980-dono, you want to post something about the various ascii "smilies" you use often on 2ch? things like WWWW or Orz... I'm sure many folks will find it useful trying to reach 2ch on their own.

hireshi
2007-07-18, 04:11
tsumaranai..

WanderingKnight
2007-07-26, 21:32
I guess you could call it an advantage, although german fangirls screaming "Sasuke-kün~" scared me for life. :heh:さすけきゅ〜ん!

:heh:

Level E
2007-07-31, 17:17
Hey, KJ1980-dono, you want to post something about the various ascii "smilies" you use often on 2ch? things like WWWW or Orz... I'm sure many folks will find it useful trying to reach 2ch on their own.

Well, I'm not a kj1980-dono, but I could explain some 2ch 用語 yougo (lingo)

First, the w
It's short for warau (笑う): to laugh. It's pretty much the same as LOL
You intensify your laugh by spamming more w

Next, orz
orz is a mirrored and a condensed version of: _| ̄|○
It's a person kneeling on the ground facing down.
In orz, o is the head, r is the body & arms, and z is the legs.

It originally meant despair, failure, but it can also be used as "I'm on my knees laughing" as well.

There ateji (当て字) which are like "teh" and other other purposely misspelled words. Replacing ン n with ソ so or ツ tsu with シ shi is pretty common. This can go further and replace the the misspelled word in kanji like 香具師 (read ヤシ yashi -> ヤツ yatsu).

Then there are horribly overkilled ones like キボンヌ -> きぼーん -> ○○を希望する
which means "I hope for ___ ."

Kanji that are homophones like 厨房 = 中坊 (both read as chuubou) are often replaced as well.
Then there are the kanji that are read wrong on purpose and converted back to hiragana or katagana. Sometimes these are mistyped purposely on top of that. Another common thing is to split kanji into parts.
eg 神 -> ネ申 or 北 written as コヒ

There are also foreign words converted to kanji:
火狐 -> Firefox browser
凶箱 -> X-Box
鯖 (さば saba) -> サーバ sa-ba -> server

Addresses with http:// is often written as ttp://
39 -> san kyu -> Thank you!
スレ sure -> thread

As for smilies... I don't know if there is a rule or standard to follow.

m(_ _)m
I guess maybe this one might be confusing (guy bowing down usually meaning gomen nasai~ )

oh yeah, then there's the ever popular: キタ━━━(゜∀゜)━━━!!!!!
and the various variations. I'm not 100% on the origin, but I'm pretty sure it came from 来た!
It means (it/the time/my fav moment/ect) has come!
It's a smiley/expression for overwhelming joy, excitement, etc.


The rest are pretty self explanatory, I think.
Is there something specific that you want to know?

WanderingKnight
2007-07-31, 20:51
Is there something specific that you want to know?

Yeah, what the hell do the turned A's mean in those crazy ASCII smilies.

Level E
2007-07-31, 22:08
Do you mean this? ∀
This is the mathematical symbol "for all" (universal quantifier (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%88%80)).
You can get type it in IME by writing すべて subete.

Most of any symbols in IME can be found by writing 記号 kigou (symbol). It's pretty handy as it'll also tell you what each symbol is, so you'll have an idea to what to type next time ^^

Alternatively if you know the symbol is a mathematical one, you can enter 数学 suugaku to get those characters as well (you'll find ∀ in this list as well). So, there's usually multiple ways to get these characters.
For example, another common symbol ω, you could type in おめが omega, or おーむ o-mu.

The kigou list is not perfect, just FYI. Like for this Russian character de (Д), you'll have to enter in でー de-. Some like 〆 shime will be listed in kigou but won't have a listed meaning/reading. These are mostly Japanese typographic symbols and I guess IME assumes you know how to read them already. You can learn about those symbols in this wiki article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_typographic_symbols).

I think that'll solve most of those strange symbols you see on 2ch.

wao
2007-08-01, 09:03
I think if you plan on using those types of smilies frequently it's quite handy to record the "words" in your IME's dictionary. That way it's a lot easier; for example if I want to get キタ━(゚∀゚)━! I can type in きたー into my IME and it will automatically convert because I registered it as a word with that reading.

Of course, the very need to actually go to that extent is admittedly not really there... Seeing that I can't post on 2ch and have generally no reason to anyway.

While I'm here I might as well mention that there is this blog started up by one of my friend's friends which explains certain otaku lingo / slang. It doesn't focus so much on specific 2ch subcultures but is more general although I find it useful too. Maybe you will too. http://bangin.wordpress.com/

AVPlaya
2007-08-01, 15:18
The rest are pretty self explanatory, I think.
Is there something specific that you want to know?

That was a great post, thanks! I know most of it but you've talked about a few I didn't know about, like the inverted A. :) I just want to get people to start talking about it so 2ch reading won't be so much of a chore.

Aird
2007-08-02, 23:10
Can someone explain what the finger or thumb with a fingerprint is supposed to mean? I've been wondering for awhile.

Here is an example:

http://img256.imageshack.us/img256/4864/1176674433038uw2.th.jpg (http://img256.imageshack.us/my.php?image=1176674433038uw2.jpg)

Thanks

wao
2007-08-03, 03:26
If you're talking about that pose itself, it's the "DADADADA" scene from the opening of a current anime, Lucky Star. The original looks like this:

http://s02.imagehost.org/1239/star_png.t.jpg (http://s02.imagehost.org/view.php?image=/1239/star.png)

The character is Konata.

aohige
2007-08-03, 16:31
If you're talking about that pose itself, it's the "DADADADA" scene from the opening of a current anime, Lucky Star.[/URL]

The character is Konata.

I don't think he's asking for identification of the picture. :heh:
I think he's asking what the swirl on her finger means, since it's an expression used fairly often.

It's just a cartoony expression of the friction ridge of the finger.
If you take a fingerprint of a finger, you can see that the friction ridge impression is a swirl.

It's just a cartoon expression, much like swirly used as blushes sometimes.
AFAIK, there's no specific meaning behind it.

Personally, everytime I see that pointing finger pose, it reminds me of Laughing Salesman's DOOOOOOOOOOON!
I'm sure with all the parodies in L/S, it's no coincidence that it sounds like she's saying DODODODON! in that opening sequence.
Afterall, they parody one of Fujiko Fujio A's other work at the start of every episode. :rolleyes:
http://img476.imageshack.us/img476/7982/b5b28b8200008551gu5.th.gif (http://img476.imageshack.us/img476/7982/b5b28b8200008551gu5.gif)

AVPlaya
2007-08-07, 17:20
Can someone explain what the finger or thumb with a fingerprint is supposed to mean? I've been wondering for awhile.

Here is an example:

http://img256.imageshack.us/img256/4864/1176674433038uw2.th.jpg (http://img256.imageshack.us/my.php?image=1176674433038uw2.jpg)

Thanks

I see that quite often, and I believe it's supposed to express the assertiveness of a character. An "in your face" kind of feeling, since he or she is jabbing a finger so close to you that you can see the prints. It's funny because it's so rude; no one would dare do this in real life.

kj1980
2007-08-14, 17:46
I think if you plan on using those types of smilies frequently it's quite handy to record the "words" in your IME's dictionary. That way it's a lot easier; for example if I want to get キタ━(゚∀゚)━! I can type in きたー into my IME and it will automatically convert because I registered it as a word with that reading.

Of course, the very need to actually go to that extent is admittedly not really there... Seeing that I can't post on 2ch and have generally no reason to anyway.

While I'm here I might as well mention that there is this blog started up by one of my friend's friends which explains certain otaku lingo / slang. It doesn't focus so much on specific 2ch subcultures but is more general although I find it useful too. Maybe you will too. http://bangin.wordpress.com/

You could also download a dictionary file that is used for IME from this site:
http://matsucon.net/material/dic/

so that you'll have all the single-line 2ch kaomoji that you'll ever need.

Or if you prefer the manual method, you can do what wao said by referring to the same site and copy-and-pasting the ASCII arts that you seem to use most often.

Sister Princess
2007-09-20, 19:16
http://d.hatena.ne.jp/keyword/Nice%20boat

According to this page, what does Nice Boat mean?

Level E
2007-09-20, 22:10
"Nice Boat" is a meme which means to divert attention to a sensitive issue.

Origin:
There is an anime call School Days (http://forums.animesuki.com/forumdisplay.php?f=72). The last episode was suppose to air on 2007/09/18, however, it was canceled due to a recent murder (http://www.asahi.com/english/Herald-asahi/TKY200709190075.html). Instead in its place this aired (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFbY9swCI8U&mode=related&search=).

As the media (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1KRbodCk7c) has compared Higurashi no Naku koro ni (http://forums.animesuki.com/forumdisplay.php?f=55) to this murder, Higurashi episode #12 was also canceled its air date on 09/19 replaced with a cooking show to fill the time slot.

HashiriyaR32
2007-09-25, 23:21
Here's something I accidentally posted in the otaku lingo thread.

Was that boat video taken in Germany? Kinny Riddle thinks so, but no one has posted in the School Days GD thread to confirm if it's so.

bayoab
2007-09-26, 01:22
Here's something I accidentally posted in the otaku lingo thread.

Was that boat video taken in Germany? Kinny Riddle thinks so, but no one has posted in the School Days GD thread to confirm if it's so.

People who found the info said the fjords of Norway.

PEDOS_GRANDE
2007-09-26, 07:24
People who found the info said the fjords of Norway.

Pining for the fjords????????

Aoie_Emesai
2007-10-09, 01:54
Ok, here's a animeish term I recently discovered from my cousin bugging me all day about it. I noticed it but I didn't think there would eventually be a naming for it.

"Zettai Ryouiki"

http://www.darkmirage.com/2006/12/15/japanese-titbits-3-zettai-ryouiki/

What do ya think of it?:D

KiNA
2007-10-09, 01:58
What exactly the question again?

I think most of us already knew what Zettai Ryouiki is :p

NoSanninWa
2007-10-09, 02:06
What do ya think of it?:D

I can only agree with kj1980's assessment of the subject:
A character that is equipped with such weapon can annihilate vast amounts of brain cells, which can amount to an intense moe~ness that is so destructive that one can overcome one's AT field in less than 0.03 seconds. That pretty much sums up my own personal experience as well. Or as others might say, "Quoted for truth."

Sister Princess
2007-10-15, 07:55
Next question:

When did Otaku world use the word 廚?

i8o
2007-10-15, 10:40
Next question:

When did Otaku world use the word 廚?

did you want to ask about 厨?

Level E
2007-10-15, 16:45
Are you asking what 厨 means?
It's an ateji. 厨 (chuu) = 厨房 (chuubou) = 中坊 (chuubou) = middle schooler = immature brat.
Somewhere earlier in this thread there's a 2ch lingo post which might help.

bayoab
2007-10-15, 22:22
自重 jijyuu is used to cation (often harshly) other people.
Doesn't this have another meaning which is more of a "Good call on <blah>". There are some cases where it makes no sense as a caution.

Level E
2007-10-15, 23:24
Doesn't this have another meaning which is more of a "Good call on <blah>". There are some cases where it makes no sense as a caution.

Maybe I should add more to what I wrote?

Add:
自重 is read as jijyuu even tho properly it's jichou.
There's no real change in the actual meaning.
It's often used to caution people. For the most part I see the msg as "enough with ____"
Sometimes it's playful. Many times I think I see it b/c the commenter is really sick
of seeing ____ so often. But it can be used in other ways.

wao
2007-10-16, 09:39
Maybe I should add more to what I wrote?

Add:
自重 is read as jijyuu even tho properly it's jichou.
There's no real change in the actual meaning.
It's often used to caution people. For the most part I see the msg as "enough with ____"
Sometimes it's playful. Many times I think I see it b/c the commenter is really sick
of seeing ____ so often. But it can be used in other ways.

When there's a "w" after it though (occasionally otherwise), I think it can be used in situations where you don't expect something but it comes there and ruins the atmosphere in a funny way. Like for example if there was a SERIOUS DRAMATIC MOMENT in an anime and someone goes in and shops a version of him looking really stupid (like with a 肉 on his forehead or something silly like that) they might say "肉自重ww"... as far as I understand (which isn't a lot).


While I'm here can I ask if anyone can tell me why people decided to use Backbeard from Gegege no Kitarou in that "KONO LOLICON DOMO-ME" picture/AA? You know, the one with the eyeball looking down at you (http://spitfire.air-nifty.com/photos/uncategorized/10009670315_s.png)... Is it a completely random thing? Apparently there's even a fan-made loli wearing black to go with it...

bayoab
2007-10-16, 11:40
Maybe this should go to the otaku lingo discussion thread or the Niconico Douga thread in General Chat. I wouldn't mind helping people understand if there are any strange slang words/puns (that is, if I understand them myself... -_-) I could totally go on about the Fuchagi series of cat videos, but that's definitely not otaku lingo.It is hard for those of us who don't reach 2ch to tell how many of the nico memes/common usages are actually not just restricted to nico or to their own topics. There are things like ずっと俺のターン which started in a 2ch thread about Yugioh, then went to Yugioh videos, but is now put as ずっと(キャラ)のターン whenever a character gets to make multiple moves of some sort (ex. girl slapping a guy). Another common one is L5 (origin Higurashi) referring to a character who has gone mad and possibly violent as a result.

Furudanuki
2007-10-17, 09:10
Back on the subject of 2ch slang - what sort of symbol or phrase is commonly used to indicate that a statement is intended to be sarcastic? Something that would be the equivalent of the "eye roll" :rolleyes: emoticon we use here?

Rembr
2007-10-17, 09:45
When there's a "w" after it though (occasionally otherwise), I think it can be used in situations where you don't expect something but it comes there and ruins the atmosphere in a funny way. Like for example if there was a SERIOUS DRAMATIC MOMENT in an anime and someone goes in and shops a version of him looking really stupid (like with a 肉 on his forehead or something silly like that) they might say "肉自重ww"... as far as I understand (which isn't a lot).自重 is used for anyone/anything with high tension. It means, roughly, 'calm down.' Deeper meaning lies in 'if you are acting too lightly, make yourself heavier.'

Level E
2007-10-18, 07:08
Deeper meaning lies in 'if you are acting too lightly, make yourself heavier.'

I agree with the "calm down," but I don't think that part is quite correct.
At least I never heard of that...

The ateji reading jijyuu is still a real word (same kanji 自重). It means dead weight. You'll use it when you calculating the weight of an unloaded vehicle for example.

Probably cation wasn't the right word. Yahoo Japanese Dictionary says jichou is "be prudent" (http://dic.yahoo.co.jp/dsearch?enc=UTF-8&p=%E8%87%AA%E9%87%8D&dtype=3&dname=2na&stype=1&pagenum=1&index=01827200).
Mr. Annoying 水色 commenter was the case I was thinking about when I wrote about 自重 first. What wao wrote is more common, now that I think of it, but the meaning of the word doesn't really change. It's just used as a lightheartedly tsukkomi.

http://img81.imageshack.us/img81/5776/mizuirojijyuujj5.th.jpg (http://img81.imageshack.us/my.php?image=mizuirojijyuujj5.jpg)http://img155.imageshack.us/img155/842/ushiro4jijyuurq7.th.jpg (http://img155.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ushiro4jijyuurq7.jpg)http://img86.imageshack.us/img86/2889/otakujijyuube3.th.jpg (http://img86.imageshack.us/my.php?image=otakujijyuube3.jpg)

Furudanuki is that a rhetorical question? w

Rembr
2007-10-18, 07:42
I agree with the "calm down," but I don't think that part is quite correct.
At least I never heard of that...? How was that definition not the same as to be prudent?

Furudanuki
2007-10-18, 09:14
Furudanuki is that a rhetorical question? w
No, that was a genuine inquiry. :) I wanted to know what would commonly be used on 2ch to make it clear that you are being a bit sarcastic. For example, what would be an equivalent to this?

That's a good idea. :rolleyes:

それは良い考えです。 ???

testorschoice
2007-10-25, 18:27
From the actual "Japanese otaku lingo" thread:

Mecha (??)
Reference to robot anime.

This should be corrected, since it perpetuates a pervasive foreign misconception of the term. Mecha just means "mechanical," so Japanese people refer to mechanical units that aren't robots as "mecha." For example, the Yamato in Space Battleship Yamato is listed under "mecha," and so are the spacecraft in Cowboy Bebop. Even cars in Patlabor are listed under mecha.

The Japanese term for robot anime is just robot anime. Robotech perpetuated the myth that "mecha" means robots, and Battletech (with "mech") exacerbating the myth.

Ziv
2007-12-26, 06:13
I found this study on Pronoun use in children. It seems Bokukko (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=bokukkos)s are pretty darn common. According to the results for the girls, 24% of pronoun uses for girls were Boku, and 2% were Ore, while none of the boys used watashi at all.

Dagger
2008-02-02, 17:30
Does うp主 just mean the person who uploaded the video? How do you read 主 in this case, anyway? :heh:

km0120
2008-02-03, 04:44
Does うp主 just mean the person who uploaded the video? How do you read 主 in this case, anyway? :heh:
1. About right. To be precise, it means the person who uploaded anything: files, images, musics, of course videos.

2. They read "nushi" in this case.

Nagato
2008-02-03, 05:27
www
Interesting. Even among Japanese, there's various readings for うp主
うぷしゅ、うぷぬし、うぴーしゅ、うぴーぬし。I read it あっぷしゅ before. Seems like, from what I found, うぷぬし is the right reading (accepted by many people).
I think other word like this also doesn't have fix reading, either.

Xellos
2008-03-25, 15:19
What exactly does gar mean? And where did it come from?

qtipbrit
2008-03-25, 18:05
What exactly does gar mean? And where did it come from?
GAR usually refers to a character's manliness, often so overbearingly powerful that it causes you to go GAR for said character.

Gar originated on 4chan (obviously.) as a mispelling of "gay" when anonymous stated that he had gone gar for Archer of Fate/Stay Night after seeing episode 14 or something.

And your avatar is freaking win.

Xellos
2008-03-26, 11:05
Thanks qtip. I kinda had the idea what gar meant, but had to make sure. And yeah, even if dansen is kinda old, Shana makes up for it.

Rembr
2008-03-26, 11:25
www
Interesting. Even among Japanese, there's various readings for うp主
うぷしゅ、うぷぬし、うぴーしゅ、うぴーぬし。I read it あっぷしゅ before. Seems like, from what I found, うぷぬし is the right reading (accepted by many people).
I think other word like this also doesn't have fix reading, either.Especially in the nico comments, people like to get very liberal with reading kanji and general Japanese usage. You often see a lot of intentionally (or sometimes maybe not) misread words, using kanjis that sound the same but does not have the same meaning, and/or using words that are phonetically similar.

The Bloodlust Kid
2008-04-17, 22:56
Is there a word used to refer to those shoulder-less sleeves (seen on Reimu Hakurei(Touhou), Miku Hatsune (Vocaloid) and Hanyuu (Higurashi)?

Mushi
2008-04-22, 09:11
Is there a word used to refer to those shoulder-less sleeves (seen on Reimu Hakurei(Touhou), Miku Hatsune (Vocaloid) and Hanyuu (Higurashi)?
I don't know if there's an otaku lingo term for it, but I think those are just commonly referred to as detached sleeves.

Quarkboy
2008-04-23, 03:18
Is there a word used to refer to those shoulder-less sleeves (seen on Reimu Hakurei(Touhou), Miku Hatsune (Vocaloid) and Hanyuu (Higurashi)?

I recall a somewhat popular meme about Reimu's sleeves called "Gap"... i.e. if she didn't wrap her breasts you'd be able to see them from the sides when she lifted her arms... But I'm not sure that "gap" ever caught on for any other clothing choice.

Mecha_Trueno
2008-05-10, 20:55
why is it that VERY often, it is the meganekko who gets the big boobs? is it a coincidence? is there a term for this combo in fact?
cant think of example at this very moment coz its like 2:55am and my brain is dead. maybe i'll edit this post tomorrow with a few examples, though im sure some of you should be able to come up with some very quickly and hopefully answer my question

cicido
2008-07-04, 16:09
why is it that VERY often, it is the meganekko who gets the big boobs? is it a coincidence? is there a term for this combo in fact?
cant think of example at this very moment coz its like 2:55am and my brain is dead. maybe i'll edit this post tomorrow with a few examples, though im sure some of you should be able to come up with some very quickly and hopefully answer my question

They are usually the "moe blob" characters, who exist purely serving the purpose of "being moe". If I'm not mistaken, those characters are also, shy, clumsy, and really kind/easy going.


So here is my question, what is the specific otaku term for the characters like Rei, Yuki, and Mai. I know that in Chinese we call them “三无“(Literally meaning "Three no's" = No mouth, no heart, no expression), but what is the Japanese/English equivalent to it?

bullzeeb
2008-07-06, 02:29
It still is a mystery to me of the entire existence of the Otaku term of America.

Klashikari
2008-07-06, 02:50
So here is my question, what is the specific otaku term for the characters like Rei, Yuki, and Mai. I know that in Chinese we call them “三无“(Literally meaning "Three no's" = No mouth, no heart, no expression), but what is the Japanese/English equivalent to it?
I don't know about Japanese equivalent, but to my knowledge, there isn't anything specific term for the english equivalent. Basically, it is either the board term "taciturn/silent", or they do it backwards: using another character as a staple term.
Usually, Ayanami Rei is used for that purpose, though recently Nagato Yuki is the one for this, as you just pointed out.

cyth
2008-07-06, 03:16
They are usually the "moe blob" characters, who exist purely serving the purpose of "being moe". If I'm not mistaken, those characters are also, shy, clumsy, and really kind/easy going.But moe blob isn't a Japanese term AFAIK.

Shiratamadango
2008-07-08, 06:19
So here is my question, what is the specific otaku term for the characters like Rei, Yuki, and Mai. I know that in Chinese we call them “三无“(Literally meaning "Three no's" = No mouth, no heart, no expression), but what is the Japanese/English equivalent to it?

Heard someone said they were "綾波系"-Ayanami Kei- because Rei was the first girl who had three no's.
But I've never used it before.

Quarkboy
2008-07-09, 04:22
I think this is the right place to ask this, but I was thinking:

Who is the first "yandere" character?

I'm sure they existed before the term was even cast, but I was thinking that maybe the first true yandere might be Flandre Scarlet from the very first windows Touhou game, "Embodiment of Scarlet Devil" which goes back to 2002.
Are there any earlier yandere characters in anime before then?

Jiyuu
2008-07-10, 03:23
seras from hellsing can be counted as one, i think XD

Vashar
2008-09-07, 18:38
I'm not sure if it's in the lingo guide, but I once wondered what does desu mean and what are the different dialects used?

I normally hear desu used after a girl introduces herself, but it can be tagged onto the end of any line apparently. From what I read, it basically is the same as the English "to be" (I am, it is, etc).

I frequently encounter someone saying, "what's with the fake kansai dialect?" It's really complicated to explain the differences between dialect... I can't tell the difference personally, but just knowing there are different accents, pronunciations, etc. I'm no longer confused when that saying comes up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_dialects
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kansai_dialect

coren
2008-09-09, 12:33
desu means 'am', 'is' or some other copula. It's used for much more than introducing, for example you should frequently hear 'so desu' 'so desu ne' 'so desu yo' 'so desu ka' etc in anime.

KitsuneNineTails
2008-09-17, 15:34
I'm not sure if it's in the lingo guide, but I once wondered what does desu mean and what are the different dialects used?

I normally hear desu used after a girl introduces herself, but it can be tagged onto the end of any line apparently. From what I read, it basically is the same as the English "to be" (I am, it is, etc).


Desu (です)is called the "copula". It is something like "to be" in English but not in the rare case when "to be" is used for "existence". です is used as like a descriptive coupling, which couples the subject/topic and the description together. Someone please correct me if I am wrong, but if I said "I am sad", the "to be" in that sentence is not describing existence, but rather coupling the adjective "sad" with the subject "I". So, 私は悲しみです(watashi wa kanashimi desu). However, saying "I think therefore I am" is using "to be" as in "I exist". So 私は思うだから私はいる。(watashi wa omou dakara watashi wa iru), which is "I think, therefore I exist".

Fortunately, I think using "to be" as "exist" is always intransitive, and not very common in English (that I can think of without sounding awkward). Usually, "to be" is used as a copula or as a helper for another verb (ie. future tense, gerund, etc.), so thinking of "desu" as "to be" works most of the time, I believe.

So, the girl introducing herself in your question is saying "watashi wa ABC desu", or "watashi no namae wa ABC desu" thus coupling the description of "ABC" to her name.

Another use of "desu" is just to add politeness (eg. watashi wa anime wo mitai desu = polite "I want to watch anime"). Also, the plain form of "desu" is "da". So you may hear "Watashi wa Hitomi da" if Hitomi is not inclined to be as polite when introducing herself.

BTW - The Kansai dialect throws me (as still a intermediate Japanese learner) for a huge loop. AFAIK, that dialect uses "-hen" for negatives, "uchi" for "I", among many other variations (I think "ja nee" instead of "ja nai" is more Kansai-ish, but I may be wrong), so it's harder for me to follow. Kinda like someone having to listen to "y'alls" and "ya hears" trying to learn English in the southern US. :)

Ciao!

Seifuu Meigetsu
2009-01-02, 14:33
Desu (です)is called the "copula". It is something like "to be" in English but not in the rare case when "to be" is used for "existence". です is used as like a descriptive coupling, which couples the subject/topic and the description together. Someone please correct me if I am wrong, but if I said "I am sad", the "to be" in that sentence is not describing existence, but rather coupling the adjective "sad" with the subject "I". So, 私は悲しみです(watashi wa kanashimi desu). However, saying "I think therefore I am" is using "to be" as in "I exist". So 私は思うだから私はいる。(watashi wa omou dakara watashi wa iru), which is "I think, therefore I exist".

Well, you're right about 「です」. It's just the sentences that need work. They're not very natural sounding, like you're just taking Japanese and substituting it for your English. ^^;
「悲しみ」is a noun. It's like saying "I am sadness."「悲しい」should be used, the adjectivial form.
「私は思うだから私はいる。」, though it technically makes sense, is a very grammatically awkward sentence.
First off,「は」. Every time you use it it's like changing the topic. It designates what you're currently talking about and thus does not need to be used again until you're talking about something else. 「私は」need not be repeated. In fact, if it's already implied you're speaking about yourself, leaving out the「私は」entirely is perfectly fine. :]
「だから」does mean "so" or "therefore", but it can only be used at the beginning of a statement (there are some odd cases where it follows a statement, but it has no actual meaning, they just put it there because it 'feels' right). When making a compound sentence, use either 「から」or「ので」.
I can't really say why, it's just that 'it feels better' thing, but「思える」sounds more natural here than「思う」.
だから・・・
私は思えるからいる。=D

Another use of "desu" is just to add politeness (eg. watashi wa anime wo mitai desu = polite "I want to watch anime"). Also, the plain form of "desu" is "da". So you may hear "Watashi wa Hitomi da" if Hitomi is not inclined to be as polite when introducing herself.
Not really, regarding「だ」. 「だ」is declarative in addition to being less formal. It would usually just be left off entirely in this case, e.g. 「私は仁美。」
EDIT. For more clarification. 「だ」makes things more forceful. It's more commonly used by guys. It can only be used after a noun or adjective and is important in grammatical structures where you must declare something, and there are cases where you mustn't attach it as well...

BTW - The Kansai dialect throws me (as still a intermediate Japanese learner) for a huge loop. AFAIK, that dialect uses "-hen" for negatives, "uchi" for "I", among many other variations (I think "ja nee" instead of "ja nai" is more Kansai-ish, but I may be wrong), so it's harder for me to follow. Kinda like someone having to listen to "y'alls" and "ya hears" trying to learn English in the southern US. :)

Ciao!

Ah yes, Kansai-ben. They say 「や」rather than「だ」and「わ」rather than「よ」...
Lots of the vocab is different. 「ちょい」instead of「ちょっと」,「けったい」instead of「変」...there's a very good list available on some website if you Google it. :]

solomon
2009-01-28, 02:43
This may or may not be otaku-related specifically but it is slang,

can someone point out just what the japanese mean when they talk about A, B, C, and D. I have heard it in causual conversation but never got around to what it meant.

Animecentred
2009-01-28, 08:06
Heya, i just wanted to check if this had a name.

In many anime when a female character makes a slightly funny or underhanded joke she raises her hand to her face and laughs behind her hand. Is there a name for that?

Rembr
2009-01-28, 10:35
This may or may not be otaku-related specifically but it is slang,

can someone point out just what the japanese mean when they talk about A, B, C, and D. I have heard it in causual conversation but never got around to what it meant.Need specific context, but generally they are the equivalent of first base, second base, etc.
Heya, i just wanted to check if this had a name.

In many anime when a female character makes a slightly funny or underhanded joke she raises her hand to her face and laughs behind her hand. Is there a name for that?Like, chuckling at her own joke?

Animecentred
2009-01-28, 11:01
Like, chuckling at her own joke?


Yeah, exactly like that.

metamorphic
2009-01-29, 06:03
I think this is the right place to ask this, but I was thinking:

Who is the first "yandere" character?

I'm sure they existed before the term was even cast, but I was thinking that maybe the first true yandere might be Flandre Scarlet from the very first windows Touhou game, "Embodiment of Scarlet Devil" which goes back to 2002.
Are there any earlier yandere characters in anime before then?
Perhaps Lum from Urusei Yatsura? That was one hugely influential show.

Kylaran
2009-02-14, 01:18
BTW - The Kansai dialect throws me (as still a intermediate Japanese learner) for a huge loop. AFAIK, that dialect uses "-hen" for negatives, "uchi" for "I", among many other variations (I think "ja nee" instead of "ja nai" is more Kansai-ish, but I may be wrong), so it's harder for me to follow. Kinda like someone having to listen to "y'alls" and "ya hears" trying to learn English in the southern US. :)

A lot of the differences in conjugation between dialects are a result of divergence in the pronunciation of older, more archaic sentence endings in Japanese. I think there's a good bit of information on that on Wikipedia. Vocabulary has grown in and out of use in a similar way, which is why you can hear some different words for things in other dialects sometimes.

Desu (です)is called the "copula". It is something like "to be" in English but not in the rare case when "to be" is used for "existence". です is used as like a descriptive coupling, which couples the subject/topic and the description together. Someone please correct me if I am wrong, but if I said "I am sad", the "to be" in that sentence is not describing existence, but rather coupling the adjective "sad" with the subject "I". So, 私は悲しみです(watashi wa kanashimi desu). However, saying "I think therefore I am" is using "to be" as in "I exist". So 私は思うだから私はいる。(watashi wa omou dakara watashi wa iru), which is "I think, therefore I exist".

Here's how I interpret these subtle differences.

A good way of understanding "desu" is that it serves as a connective in specific sentences linking the subject with the descriptor, rather than having any equal in the English language. For example 私 (subject) は (topic) 悲しい (sad) です (copula). We translate the sentence as "I am sad" in English, but the actual formal dissection of this sentence is I (topic) sad (linking subject to descriptor). It's not something easily translated in isolation.

The reason why です is so formal because it's like separating the contractions and making that sentence full. Without です、 the sentence makes sense (私は悲しい) but it loses formality because it does not emphasize that link (this conjecture is debatable; I'm kind of giving it my own description here). The difference is so subtle that I usually find few other ways to be considerate of such subtleties. Of course, this is the denotative semantic meaning. Connotative semantic meaning is a bit easier to define in situations like these.

English can use contractions in formal situations, so it's a bit more loose than the usage of です in formal situations, but even then we can find examples in English in which we add emphasis to the "linking verb" for similar reasons, although the sentence technically sounds more formal to our ears.

A little visual side-by-side comparison helps too:
Honorifics - changes the grammar and vocabulary, so it's like rewriting your sentences entirely to fit a more respectful, polite tone.
Polite form (です) - Fulfills the basic, proper sentence.
Plain form (だ) - Shortens the proper structure but retains the same meaning.

Oh, just as a little plus. I looked this up on Japanese wikipedia:

Cogito ergo sum. I think therefore I am.
我思う、ゆえに我あり
I think, and for that reason (or therefore) I exist.

あり is a bit closer to "to exist" than simply "to be."

Who is the first "yandere" character?

First MAJOR yandere I think of is Kaede from Shuffle!.

KitsuneNineTails
2009-03-16, 13:49
Well, you're right about 「です」. It's just the sentences that need work.

Thanks for the corrections. Like I said, I'm still a total novice. I wrote that before I started taking real classes. I've learned so much in just five months, it's hard for me to look back and think "wow, did I really write that?"

demo... watashi wa ganbatteimasu yo! ;)

I think I should have used a better example, more along the lines of "watashi no ie ni imasu" or "enpitsu ga tsukue no ue ni arimasu" vs. "watashi wa genki desu". But, the more corrections I get, the better I'll become... Eventually. :)

Ciao!

C.A.
2009-03-21, 08:53
Hmmm recently I wanted to mention a certain character type, but found that I had a mind block and can't remember what that term is.

What's the Japanese term for clumsy moe characters? Like Lucky Star's Miyuki and IM@S's Haruka, they just have to trip and bump into stuff every now and then.

Also what's the term for airheads like Tsukasa?

EDIT: Just learned from friends that its "dojikko and tennenboke".

Ottocycle
2009-03-21, 09:35
Dojikko-moe?

Dunno about the airheads though.

Jan-Poo
2009-03-21, 09:50
i think "boke" is commonly used for them, but i might be wrong...

The Bloodlust Kid
2009-12-12, 11:54
I think this is the right place to ask this, but I was thinking:

Who is the first "yandere" character?

I'm sure they existed before the term was even cast, but I was thinking that maybe the first true yandere might be Flandre Scarlet from the very first windows Touhou game, "Embodiment of Scarlet Devil" which goes back to 2002.
Are there any earlier yandere characters in anime before then?

I think it even goes back to Antiquity age. There was a character in The Tale of Genji that was jealous of one of Genji's lovers that she placed a curse on her. I don't remember all of it or if that even counts.

Langknow
2010-01-07, 12:04
I'm not sure if it's in the lingo guide, but I once wondered what does desu mean and what are the different dialects used?

I normally hear desu used after a girl introduces herself, but it can be tagged onto the end of any line apparently. From what I read, it basically is the same as the English "to be" (I am, it is, etc).

I frequently encounter someone saying, "what's with the fake kansai dialect?" It's really complicated to explain the differences between dialect... I can't tell the difference personally, but just knowing there are different accents, pronunciations, etc. I'm no longer confused when that saying comes up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_dialects
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kansai_dialect

Something I learned from watching anime is that quite and super cute girl characeters like to enunciate the Desu in their sentences, while normal japanese would say "dess" instead of "de suuuu "..

So when I was first learning Japanese, I thought I was suppose to say "DE suuuu" , but after learning more about it, the more normal way of saying it would be " desss", or sounds like it...

kj1980
2010-10-01, 22:52
Been a while since my last post, but I added Otoko no Ko (http://forums.animesuki.com/showpost.php?p=3275181&postcount=82) today.

However, I think there needs to be better English equivalent for this lingo. Birl? Goy? www

arilando
2015-04-30, 10:44
Seems like a lot of posts early in the thread got deleted. What happened?

relentlessflame
2015-04-30, 20:21
Seems like a lot of posts early in the thread got deleted. What happened?

I don't see anything in this thread that got deleted, but some links to external sites no longer work... because they were on external sites that we can't control. (Also, please mind the dates of the posts in this thread. The previous post had been 4 1/2 years ago.)

arilando
2015-05-01, 02:51
I don't see anything in this thread that got deleted, but some links to external sites no longer work... because they were on external sites that we can't control. (Also, please mind the dates of the posts in this thread. The previous post had been 4 1/2 years ago.)
The third and fourth post seems to be quoting a post that no longer exists. Maybe i misunderstood something, but that is what it seems like to me.