PDA

View Full Version : Laws about BT


Hindy83
2003-11-14, 10:12
Does any one know the laws about sharing unlicensed anime through BT? Can you give me some type of reference to the actual text? My school is trying to crack down on BT and P2P file sharing because it is a violation of copy right laws. Adult swim is a farce of anime (with all the editing that they do) and it is soon going to be my only source if they have their way.

Esperchld
2003-11-14, 10:17
The distribution of copyrited material (without permission) is illegal regardless of who owns the copyrite and what the material is. The shows that are fansubbed are copyrite the company that made the show. The distribution of these is illegal regardless the method. It just looks legal as people turn a blind eye to fansubbing. It can't be given legitimacy without giving it to bootlegs as well, and that is the problem.

Lambda
2003-11-14, 10:53
My school is trying to crack down on BT and P2P file sharing because it is a violation of copy right laws.

Filesharing is not a violation of copyright laws. Only when you share copyrighted information without the consent of the holder is there a violation. Bittorrent in particular is used to distribute many files perfectly legitimately, such as free software. KaZaa is one of the main publicity tools of the free music movement, again perfectly legitimately.

xris
2003-11-14, 10:59
You may want to look at the AnimeSuki Licensed Anime (http://www.animesuki.com/doc.php/licensed/) page as well as this thread from the old forum, Legal issues concerning fansubbing (http://conversion.animesuki.com/BurningBoard/thread.php?threadid=1921).

And to put it in context of unlicensed anime, it is a violation of copyright laws. So is illegal.

JAppi
2003-11-14, 14:38
Filesharing is not a violation of copyright laws. Only when you share copyrighted information without the consent of the holder is there a violation. Bittorrent in particular is used to distribute many files perfectly legitimately, such as free software. KaZaa is one of the main publicity tools of the free music movement, again perfectly legitimately.

You are very misguided if you believe that p2p is not for illegal purposes. The orginal purpose of napster was to share music. The majority of music is illegal to share. People sharing their music on a p2p network will see little sucess. If the vast majority of filesharing is to share illegal files, Then why not shut it all down to begin with.

I'm sure Microlith will post something about damning licnesed anime leechers.

Hunter
2003-11-14, 15:39
Lambda said it all, even if almost all the user of this kind software use it to download illegal stuff, the software by itself isn't an illegal one.

Btw unlicensed or licensed anime are both illegal, the unlicensed fansub is tolerated, not legal.

aquilus
2003-11-14, 15:59
You are very misguided if you believe that p2p is not for illegal purposes. The orginal purpose of napster was to share music. The majority of music is illegal to share. People sharing their music on a p2p network will see little sucess. If the vast majority of filesharing is to share illegal files, Then why not shut it all down to begin with.

The content doesnīt really define the legality of its medium ... at least if one isnīt affected by ridiculous pieces of legislation. However, as the majority of stuff transferred thru p2p-apps like kazaa is copyrighted, yet distributed without permission, it makes sense for the school to "crack down" on such use of their network.

Kyuven
2003-11-14, 16:08
just use a computer at home and solve all your problems
Adult Swim isn't that bad, a lot of people working at CN LOVED FLCL so it turns out the editing job isn't as bad as some others (i think there's just a curse blip, some extra censory on Naota's dad, and the very end of ep. 6 is cut out for time's sake)

LuciaMelody
2003-11-14, 16:19
As many said before the software is NOt illegal. Why? Because may be u want to make ur ..i dont know...graduation, or a song u wrote, into a BT file or P2P file and share it with others for whatever reasons.

Some of the files transfered are legal some are not. That is all.

Why would a school want to deal with this? May be Im not getting something....what, somebody scanned their homework on p2p and teachers are trying to stop them? :D

extarbags
2003-11-14, 17:38
Schools are not responsible for what their students share. Most of the time schools crack down on file sharing apps, it's because they want to conserve bandwidth.

zalas
2003-11-14, 18:08
Schools are not responsible for what their students share. Most of the time schools crack down on file sharing apps, it's because they want to conserve bandwidth.
Actually universities will get sued for what students do on their networks. This is because by sueing the students, they can't get much money out of them, they're poor college students. But, they can bring charges against the university or at least threaten to, which causes the university to act.

extarbags
2003-11-14, 18:33
Actually universities will get sued for what students do on their networks. This is because by sueing the students, they can't get much money out of them, they're poor college students. But, they can bring charges against the university or at least threaten to, which causes the university to act.

That's very cute, and it makes sense that they'd go after someone with more money... it's a shame that they have no legal ground on which to do so.

hunterx
2003-11-14, 19:15
school computers are for school work. So whether it is legal or not is not their concern, you shouldn't be using it to download anime. Just like playing games on computers at school is frowned upon (unless you're the lab assistant :) )

extarbags
2003-11-14, 19:21
school computers are for school work. So whether it is legal or not is not their concern, you shouldn't be using it to download anime. Just like playing games on computers at school is frowned upon (unless you're the lab assistant :) )

I'm pretty sure this thread isn't about high shool, but about college networks. You lose.

method
2003-11-14, 20:06
This is one of the few times I have to agree with Lambda. P2p applications in themselves are not illegal well except for Kazaa lite. It's just that 95% of the material being transferred on them is copyrighted. For most schools it is easier just to block the ports that p2p applications use than try to sort out who is doing what and also protect themselves from being sued by the MPAA and RIAA. Well its either Adult Swim or buy your anime then.

extarbags
2003-11-14, 21:00
buy your anime then.

Oh, definitely. Nothing says "moral and legal" like buying bootlegged dvds of unlicensed anime that were pressed and sold by the Triad.

method
2003-11-14, 21:09
Of course, The Triad are just a fun loving group of individuals who reputation was ruined by the liberal media. What's wrong with going down to your local Suncoast or buying anime from places like bestprices.com or animenation.com?

Lambda
2003-11-14, 21:14
You are very misguided if you believe that p2p is not for illegal purposes. The orginal purpose of napster was to share music.

The original purpose of bittorrent was to enable easy distribution of things such as linux ISOs. The original purpose of freenet was to establish an alternative to the internet in which privacy was virtually assured. Peer to peer is a far bigger concept than any particular purpose you might think for it, it is simply an alternative model for electronically distributing information to the client-server model, which has risen in those areas in which client-server is becoming inadequate. With the proliferation of broadband, I wouldn't be surprised if peer to peer ends up being the basis on which most of the internet runs eventually, once the necessary protocols become seamlessly and ubiquitously integrated into the necessary software.

hunterx
2003-11-14, 21:46
I'm pretty sure this thread isn't about high shool, but about college networks. You lose.

are you pretty sure or you don't know? or maybe you can't read?

My school is trying to crack down on BT and P2P file sharing because it is a violation of copy right laws

method
2003-11-14, 22:23
Well the poster said his age or if he was in college or not, so you can't say for certain what venue he is talking about. Judging by his username and assuming the normal tendencies of using your birth year I guess he is in college.

microlith
2003-11-15, 02:04
P2P won't in any way become core to the internet due to its nature as a popularity contest. That which is popular continues to exist, and marginal stuff gets swept into the abyss.

Guess what would be left?

Sadly, 90% of P2P systems _are_ used for warez, and the only one that might have extensive use outside of it (freenet) is horribly slow and has a disproportionate amount of what would essentially be illegal materials (solely cause of its anonymous nature.)

I don't see P2P replacing anything, but I do see system like bittorrent being implemented for official distribution of large files (like id and various game sites do.) I can guarantee that P2P will never replace HTTP or FTP for day-to-day internet activity simply because of its unreliability.

JAppi
2003-11-15, 02:07
Well first of all you should know that True peer to peer is only effective with less then 10 computers. Since all of the so-called "P2P" networks make use of peers who turn their computers into servers it's not a whole hell of alot different then the current model of the internet.

Second of all, the school can ban what ever the hell they want. Even if it makes no sense what so ever the school, if it wanted to could ban it they can.

I fairly sure that only a vast minorty of people actually use fileshare programs for their intended legal uses. Thousands of people download naruto every week. How many of those people have ever used Bittorrent to dl a linux iso? There may have been one or two, but that isn't a whole lot. For every person who downloads a linux iso using BT I'm entirely sure that at least 100 people download some file of debatable legality.

How many ISOs have you downloaded with BT recently? Why are you browsing a non-freenet site? These website are very insecure, non-private. How many legal songs have you downloaded on the Fastrack network?

Flash_Squirrel
2003-11-15, 02:21
Filesharing is not a violation of copyright laws. Only when you share copyrighted information without the consent of the holder is there a violation.

And are you sure that if the Uni says "Dont download licensed music, warez, games, etc.." someone will REALLY do that?
The 99,9% of the files on BT, or kazaa, winmx, emule, usenet, etc. are illegal, I dont see a problem if your school blocks those applications, hell the school can do whatever it wants with their systeml, dont you think? -_-;;

I dont think they wants to go into problems for sharing illegal material just because a single person might want to trade a selfmade MP3 while 1500 others are downloading copyrighted material.

zalas
2003-11-15, 02:56
That's very cute, and it makes sense that they'd go after someone with more money... it's a shame that they have no legal ground on which to do so.

Then how do you explain the Judicial Administrator letters that people get when they get cracked down on by the MPAA? That has happened at my school _many_ times, even once when my friend's computer was compromised. MPAA has the right to sue someone if they are indeed distributing illegal materials or intentionally allowing others to use their network to do so. Basically you can sue the bank robbers, AND the get away drivers.

Lambda
2003-11-23, 16:11
Thousands of people download naruto every week. How many of those people have ever used Bittorrent to dl a linux iso?

That question can be reversed. How many people downloading linux with BT are also downloading Naruto?

I believe the more popular such distributions run into the tens of thousands of downloaders. It makes sense, after all, linux has millions of users, and a significant proportion obtain it through downloading.

But none of this is important. Bittorrent was designed for legal purposes, and is used for legal purposes. The proportion of the total usage that these form is unimportant in most respects.

How many ISOs have you downloaded with BT recently?

Given the forum I'm posting on, such a comparison is heavily weighted.

Why are you browsing a non-freenet site? These website are very insecure, non-private.

Because I'm not terribly worried about people finding out I'm going to such a site. If I lived in China and wanted to view information that the government was eager to censor, things might be different.

How many legal songs have you downloaded on the Fastrack network?

Actually, quite a lot. Classical music, you understand.

Lambda
2003-11-23, 16:17
Filesharing is not a violation of copyright laws. Only when you share copyrighted information without the consent of the holder is there a violation.And are you sure that if the Uni says "Dont download licensed music, warez, games, etc.." someone will REALLY do that?
The 99,9% of the files on BT, or kazaa, winmx, emule, usenet, etc. are illegal, I dont see a problem if your school blocks those applications, hell the school can do whatever it wants with their systeml, dont you think? -_-;;

I dont think they wants to go into problems for sharing illegal material just because a single person might want to trade a selfmade MP3 while 1500 others are downloading copyrighted material.

All of that is quite valid, (except the 99.9% statistic looks rather suspicious when applied to BT and usenet), but none of it actually relates to my previous post, which wasn't intended to imply more than it said.