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MisterJB MisterJB is offline

Warden of the West

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Showing Visitor Messages 601 to 610 of 2026
  1. Shiek927
    2009-11-12 18:48
    Shiek927
    Ohhh, I see. I thought they were originally in portuguese

    Thing is, I want to send you the entire folder, especially since these are picture files, but all the methods I can think of only send individual files -_-.

    I think I'll just send you the link to the baidu thread that has them all, since that seems to be the only way. I'll PM you the known translations.
  2. revan5
    2009-11-12 18:12
    revan5
    "It's amazing how a player who ate bananas in the middle of the game,refused to treat his depression."

    You never know, he could have been suffering from Bi-Polar Disorder. Those people have been known to be manically happy some moments and extremely depressed a few hours later. My guess is he had some real big mood swings...
  3. revan5
    2009-11-12 18:04
    revan5
    Interesting thing about why the national leaders don't want the post elected: they don't want to give the post a "democratic mandate" that might propel big names to the European Council Presidency. Same thing for big names becoming EU High Representative...EU Commission President Barroso (you should know him well) doesn't want a big name at the post to overshadow him. Talk about petty reasoning for no Europe-wide vote for the European Council Presidency.

    http://blogs.reuters.com/commentarie...-eu-president/

    "A camel, says an old Middle East joke, is a horse designed by a committee.

    The European Union is in danger of getting camels for its two new leadership positions — president of the European Council and foreign policy High Representative — because of the dysfunctional appointment process created by the Lisbon Treaty.

    The secretive horse (or camel)-trading by which EU governments choose the 27-nation bloc’s top office-holders seems designed to deter strong candidates and produce lowest-common-denominator outcomes. Some of the most able potential contenders would rather stay at home than take the key jobs to Brussels.

    The treaty does not provide for a democratic election because the EU is not a state, and national governments don’t want a European president with his own legitimacy. However, the rules also seem to set aside the basic principles and procedures that any private sector company or public authority would use to select the best CEO or manager.

    In a normal selection process, the jobs would go to the best qualified candidates with a clear vision, relevant experience and a track record of achievement, normally after a series of rigorous interviews. But the treaty suggests that the need to share the spoils among large and small states, and countries from the north, south, east and west of Europe is more important than criteria such as ability, charisma or experience."

    But wait, it gets worse:

    "In choosing the persons called upon to hold the offices of President of the European Council, President of the Commission and High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, due account is to be taken of the need to respect the geographical and demographic diversity of the Union and its Member States.

    Add to this the need to divvy up the top jobs among Europe’s main political families (conservatives, socialists and liberals), and a growing demand for gender balance, and you have a selection process in which identifying the strongest talent is not necessarily the top priority.

    Aggravating the problem is the increasingly clear message that politicians in the EU’s biggest member states regard holding national office as far more attractive and important that serving the European Union. Both former German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier and current British Foreign Secretary David Miliband have signalled they wish to stay in national politics, even if that means a long spell in opposition, rather than take the EU foreign policy job. All three major European powers have nominated second-ranking politicians for the European Commission.

    Furthermore, many national leaders do not want a strong personality in the EU presidency who might overshadow them, and European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso is said to be not keen to have a political star as foreign policy chief (and vice-president of the Commission) for similar reasons."

    If the national leaders weren't so jealous of their precedence here's what I'd suggest to solve this situation:

    Have all members of the European Commission be elected members of European Parliament, with the majority party/coalition controlling the majority of Commission spots. You could let the national governments nominate an elected MEP to be Commissioner (reflecting whichever party was in national power), and then also have the European Council President be elected.

    With regards to the election for European Council President, if you don't give the national governments a choice in this, it'll never happen. Therefore make sure they are the only ones who can nominate candidates (say 20% of EU countries support minimum for candidate to run). Once you've got your field of up to five candidates, you can then run an election. If no one gets a simple majority, then the top two candidates do a run-off election after the European election. Don't grant them any additional powers, just allow the post to be elected. That way you'd get a German-style Parliamentary system that I think everyone would be happier with.
  4. revan5
    2009-11-12 09:47
    revan5
    "Wrong. I simply did not have the time to give your question the answer it deserved. Even now, I'm typing this from my cellphone. I'll answer as soon as I have more time."

    Man, talk about being pleasantly surprised! BTW, if you could vote for and nominate anyone, who would be your top choice for European President? Portugal's Prime Minister? Someone else?

    Found a little coverage of it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLYbO20UoZE&NR=1

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRHru9tdrOU
  5. revan5
    2009-11-11 22:50
    revan5
    I'm going to take a wild guess and say my little political Spiel bored you. Right or wrong?
  6. Shiek927
    2009-11-11 20:46
    Shiek927
    I've been listening to more Voltaire; can't believe he did the intro for the cartoon Bill and Mandy , and he even has a song called "Bomb New Jersey"

    Honestly, I think we have a pretty undeserved reputation. I know we're "infamous", we have a thousand factories, the highest property taxes, horrific education, crime and gangs through the roof......but still!!!!

    (he's right though, Elizabeth does stink )
  7. Shiek927
    2009-11-11 20:44
    Shiek927
    And they're all in english?

    But that's weird, I thought you told me they were only in portuguese, unless I"m thinking of another series

    How should I send them? I have them on a folder on my computer.

    Roflmao, I never saw the english dub, heard bad things about it(like what Gangsta said about changing the story).
  8. revan5
    2009-11-11 19:56
    revan5
    BTW, I forgot to ask for your thoughts on the new positions created by the Lisbon Treaty, namely the President of the European Council (AKA European President) and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (AKA EU Foreign Minister). I figured you might be interested in where Europe is going politically, since you live there. I for one anticipate Europe is becoming a confederation of states that is bordering on being a federation in key areas.

    One interesting thing about Lisbon is that there is now an "EU External Action Service" (AKA EU Diplomatic Corps) that will staff consulates and embassies worldwide. The High Representative will be in charge of its 8,000+ staff, embassies, consulates and 12 billion Euro aid budget. The President of the European Council in contrast does not have such a power base, but they're in charge of directing the national leaders' meetings and agenda for 2.5 years, possibly 5 if national leaders approve of them enough to get votes for a second term from them. I was just wondering if you'd care to share your thoughts on where Europe is politically right now, where you see it going, and where you'd like to see it going.

    Hey I know this might not be your "cup of tea", but since it concerns Portugal, I figured, "why not ask MisterJB?" Especially when you should be getting a vote on whether you'd like a Belgian or Dutch Prime Minister to become your "President of the European Council". Anyways, got any opinion on who you'd like to see as European President if you could vote for them?
  9. Shiek927
    2009-11-11 18:36
    Shiek927
    Yes, I got the first book. Didn't you say though their was more then one?

    Yes, I have them. Do you need them?
  10. Shiek927
    2009-11-10 12:27
    Shiek927
    Well, thanks for the effort

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