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-   -   Do you think anime sequels guarantee full adaptation of original media? (http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=114715)

tyson123g 2012-09-12 16:04

Do you think anime sequels guarantee full adaptation of original media?
 
What I want to ask is, do you think TV series sequels guarantee that the original manga/light novel will be fully animated, in the future?

And I am not talking about those 2 cour series, which air taking a season break, like Jormungand, Kimi to Boku, etc. where the 2nd series was pre determined. I am meaning series which come back after an year or two or maybe even more.

The reason for asking this is, since most of the times the TV series are adapted from the original media and then tested out among the audience. At that point of time, they are not thinking about completely adapting the series. If it sells well enough, then only it'd be decided to get a sequel or not. Otherwise, it'd just get an open ending or possibly an anime original ending.

But once it sells well, and is made into a sequel, do you think they now intend to finish the whole anime? Unless there is a problem from the mangaka's side, is it possible that they completely animate it? There are some examples where the sequels just keep on coming like Bakuman, Natsume Yuujinchou, Major, etc.

What do you think?

relentlessflame 2012-09-12 17:14

Well, there are no guarantees of anything, of course. This is talking mostly about late-night anime, but sequels generally attract a smaller audience than the original series. It isn't necessarily clear whether this is because people are more interested in the "new shiny" or just because there's so much turnaround in the anime fanbase that people have to be willing to go back and watch the original before the sequel. But there are certainly cases where a show performs well, gets a sequel that shows a significant drop in sales, and then just ends up dying on the vine. There are, however, a few cases recently where even a show that sold poorly as a sequel got revived some time later for a final run just to close things off; these seem to sell even worse than the sequel that preceded them, but I suppose it could also be seen as a way of garnering some good will with long-time fans (and encouraging new fans to give the source material one last chance now that it's finished).

All in all, my interpretation of a sequel is that it's soft of like seeing if "lightning will strike twice". The better the sequel does, the more likely they are to try for another and head for the finish line. I do think that, when they plan for a second season, they are more likely to have future seasons in their planning if the source material is on-going.

Kirarakim 2012-09-12 19:20

Quote:

Originally Posted by tyson123g (Post 4349090)
What I want to ask is, do you think TV series sequels guarantee that the original manga/light novel will be fully animated, in the future?

Nope it doesn't guarantee it at all. One example that immediatly springs to mind is the Story of Saiunkoku. It had 2 seasons of 39 episodes (which is a good number) but the anime never finished off the novels...even though they have been finished.

TinyRedLeaf 2012-09-12 19:50

First and foremost, anime is a business. Before any project is green-lit, an anime production committee is formed, typically a grouping of production studio, merchandisers, distributors and broadcasters, and each stakeholder studies the business prospects, weighs the costs and decides what he hopes to get out of the project.

In short, "full adaptation" of original material is probably not as high on the business agenda as most fans would like. Tough. Complain and moan about it if you like, but that's the brute fact of life. (Note: I use "you" in general; I'm not referring to just the OP.) Resources are needed to create anything — expensive resources I might add; the average anime episode costs upwards of US$200,000 — and nothing comes for free. Think about that the next time you watch a fansub without the slightest thought of giving anything back to the industry that feeds your non-essential entertainment needs.

That aside, I really wish fans would stop demanding "full" or "faithful" adaptation of any manga, light novel or book. Of course, it'll be great if that occurs, but I don't see it as essential. What works on paper doesn't necessarily work on screen. I'd much rather see anime producers exercising their professional judgment to ensure that the adaptation suits their medium, and that the project works within their logistical limits.

Fans should just be more open to the possibilities of multiple interpretations of a concept. Batman, for example, is a concept that can, and has been, interpreted in hundreds of different ways ever since the character and its mythos were first conceived. The same approach should apply to anime adaptations of any existing story or franchise. We'd get more variety and not more of the same. That's a boon, not a curse.

tyson123g 2012-09-12 23:41

Quote:

Originally Posted by relentlessflame (Post 4349169)
I do think that, when they plan for a second season, they are more likely to have future seasons in their planning if the source material is on-going.

Yeah, more or less, this is what I was thinking about.

Quote:

Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf (Post 4349307)
...

I am of course, not saying that, I always wish the full series was fully adapted. But logically for us, who don't know how to read Japanese, can't always read upon the original media. So, in these cases, anime work better.

Of course, primarily the motive is to make the manga/light novel sell better, now that it has come to light after an anime adaptation.


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