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-   -   Advice on video card for Premier Pro CS6 (http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=115910)

Sugetsu 2012-10-30 16:37

Advice on video card for Premier Pro CS6
 
I am building a budget video editing PC for a friend of mine but she only has 800 dollars to spend max. So the video card selection is a bit tricky here, I know that the mercury playback engine uses Nvidia CUDA cards for GPU acceleration but for $60 which card would you prefer?

A. GeForce 9800 GT HDMI 1GB 256-bit DDR3
Or
B. Radeon HD 5770 1GB DDR5

Would it make world difference using the Geforce over the ATI card for CS6? The 5770 is a much more powerful card and I feel kinda bad having to install that outdated Geforce card.

Thanks.

Jinto 2012-10-31 03:46

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sugetsu (Post 4419252)
I am building a budget video editing PC for a friend of mine but she only has 800 dollars to spend max. So the video card selection is a bit tricky here, I know that the mercury playback engine uses Nvidia CUDA cards for GPU acceleration but for $60 which card would you prefer?

A. GeForce 9800 GT HDMI 1GB 256-bit DDR3
Or
B. Radeon HD 5770 1GB DDR5

Would it make world difference using the Geforce over the ATI card for CS6? The 5770 is a much more powerful card and I feel kinda bad having to install that outdated Geforce card.

Thanks.

According to Adobe neither of the cards is supported by the Mercury Playback Engine. Besides in video editing the speed of HDD's and to have a lot of RAM is more crucial than raw GPU/CPU performance.
Only after you have achieved fast file-IO, you should really worry about GPU performance. (it will be very hard to get decent file-IO speeds with a 800$ system - good luck with that).

Anyway here is a list with the supported cards:


GeForce GTX 285 (Windows® and Mac OS)
GeForce GTX 470 (Windows)
GeForce GTX 570 (Windows)
GeForce GTX 580 (Windows)
Quadro FX 3700M (Windows)
Quadro FX 3800 (Windows)
Quadro FX 3800M (Windows)
Quadro FX 4800 (Windows and Mac OS)
Quadro FX 5800 (Windows)
Quadro 2000 (Windows)
Quadro 2000D (Windows)
Quadro 2000M (Windows)
Quadro 3000M (Windows)
Quadro 4000 (Windows and Mac OS)
Quadro 4000M (Windows)
Quadro 5000 (Windows)
Quadro 5000M (Windows)
Quadro 5010M (Windows)
Quadro 6000 (Windows)
Quadro CX (Windows)
Tesla C2075* (Windows)
AMD Radeon HD 6750M (only on MacBook Pro computers with OSX 10.7.x with minimum 1GB VRAM)
AMD Radeon HD 6770M (only on MacBook Pro computers with OSX 10.7.x with minimum 1GB VRAM)

Sugetsu 2012-10-31 10:52

There is a simple hack that allows you to use mercury engine on any Nvidia cuda card as long as it has 1gb or memory:

http://www.studio1productions.com/Ar.../PhotoShop.htm

The build I have already has 256gb ssd and 16gigs of ram.

In any case, is there any one in this forums who has experience using nvidia cards in Premier pro? Is the difference significant to justify downgrading to the 9800 GT over the 5770?

Thanks :)

-KarumA- 2012-10-31 12:59

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sugetsu (Post 4420240)
There is a simple hack that allows you to use mercury engine on any Nvidia cuda card as long as it has 1gb or memory:

http://www.studio1productions.com/Ar.../PhotoShop.htm

The build I have already has 256gb ssd and 16gigs of ram.

In any case, is there any one in this forums who has experience using nvidia cards in Premier pro? Is the difference significant to justify downgrading to the 9800 GT over the 5770?

Thanks :)

I had a 9800 gt before several years back, had 4gb ram as well but the workspace navigation in projects was alright, the problem came when rendering which took a long time and running multiple programs such as after effects or photoshop along side of premiere. Using HD footage is def not recommended this way.
Also I believe using that amount of ram but such a low graded gpu might just bottleneck.
I upgraded to a gtx 280 or something along that line which made the overall performance a lot better (ofc upgraded ram and cpu as well).
What cpu are you using for the build?
Also you might want a normal hd for storage, I kept a lot of stock footage as well as raw video material which can easily grow up to 500gb if you're well busy in a year. HD footage is quite big.
There are cards benchmarked for things such as premiere pro or final cut, also some marked to be approved for such work. I would take a look at benchmarks.
I bought my newer gpu's 2nd hand from other companies or fellow non overclocking gamers, they are just as good if you know which one to look for.

Sugetsu 2012-10-31 17:11

Quote:

Originally Posted by -KarumA- (Post 4420367)
I had a 9800 gt before several years back, had 4gb ram as well but the workspace navigation in projects was alright, the problem came when rendering which took a long time and running multiple programs such as after effects or photoshop along side of premiere. Using HD footage is def not recommended this way.
Also I believe using that amount of ram but such a low graded gpu might just bottleneck.
I upgraded to a gtx 280 or something along that line which made the overall performance a lot better (ofc upgraded ram and cpu as well).
What cpu are you using for the build?
Also you might want a normal hd for storage, I kept a lot of stock footage as well as raw video material which can easily grow up to 500gb if you're well busy in a year. HD footage is quite big.
There are cards benchmarked for things such as premiere pro or final cut, also some marked to be approved for such work. I would take a look at benchmarks.
I bought my newer gpu's 2nd hand from other companies or fellow non overclocking gamers, they are just as good if you know which one to look for.

The CPU will be the FX 8350, which is a multitasking beast. It beats the i5 and it is almost as good as the i7 in multi threadig apps for less money.

But yeah, as I said, if you had to decide with a budget from $60 to $80 dollars what GPU would you get? The best I have found is 5770 or 9800 GT, other nvidia cards suitable for CS6 are much more expensive. So I am left with an outdated CUDA card or decent card that CS6 won't use for hardware acceleration. :(

Jinto 2012-10-31 18:18

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sugetsu (Post 4420620)
The CPU will be the FX 8350, which is a multitasking beast. It beats the i5 and it is almost as good as the i7 in multi threadig apps for less money.

But yeah, as I said, if you had to decide with a budget from $60 to $80 dollars what GPU would you get? The best I have found is 5770 or 9800 GT, other nvidia cards suitable for CS6 are much more expensive. So I am left with an outdated CUDA card or decent card that CS6 won't use for hardware acceleration. :(

9800 GT is CUDA capable, but you need to consider that the VRAM and CUDA capability is not the only important selling point here (if you want the actual hardware acceleration to work correctly).

When you program shader scripts for GPUs you might experience, that you run very easily into limits regarding the length of the shader scripts. The more complicated the algorithm, the more op-code you need. But GPUs are not exactly good with lots of op-code (thats where CPUs are better at). They work best with little op-code and lots and lots of data that is processed massively parallelized using the little op-code.

This is also why you see so many Quadro graphics card in this ranking. For those cards a very decent hardware/firmware support of OpenGL is very important, they are dedicated CAD graphics cards (which means better op-code support).
Additionaly, the Quadro cards have a much better floating point arithmethic then GeForce cards (sometimes just a firmware limitation though because the gameing cards "don't need it").

I am quite certain that the mercury engine will require lots of floating point arithmetic performance and maybe more than average support for larger sets of op-code.

If you consider this, then it is not surprising that you see many Quadro cards in the line up, but only few/recent GeForce cards.
Furthermore, if you look at the list, then the minimum number of CUDA cores on these cards seems to be 192. There might be a reason for that too.

So, when you patch the white list file of the mercury engine that even older cards work with the latest version. The actual question remains, does it really make a difference.

I think your current setup (regarding file-IO) is very good for the intended job (considering the price). I hope everything will work nicely together (sometimes there are problems when many rather cheap components are used).

I would say, don't worry about the graphics card. For the mercury engine it should not make a huge difference. The 9800GT has just 112 CUDA cores (which is very low by standards of the official list).

And I thought my 580GTX is pretty mediocre these days. But it seems sufficient for video editing :heh:


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