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-   -   Adobe Suite CS...what now? (http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=116113)

KholdStare 2012-11-09 17:31

Adobe Suite CS...what now?
 
I've been using CS3 for a while now, and mainly for Photoshop, Premiere, After Effects, and Dreamweaver not much else. I think we're up to what, CS6 now, and right now I have no plan to upgrade. That's because I haven't heard of some new wondrous change that would help me in some way. So what I want to ask is, what's new? What does CS6 have for those programs above that CS3 doesn't have?

In my generation, Photoshop CS2 -> CS3 was a nice change with a new look and the addition of some convenient tools. It also combined ImageReady, which was weird at first, but probably more efficient after I mastered the new Photoshop. And of course CS -> CS2 featured many new tools, my favorite being Surface Blur. I wonder if there's something cool in Photoshop now, and for the other programs too.

Anyways, thanks a lot in advance for your replies.

Flower 2012-11-09 17:38

We at our office have been using 5.5 ... but we mainly use it for InDesign and Acrobat. We do some Photoshop work, and while the main user of it has said there were a few new tools he used in a practical everyday sense that were worth it. But then again he does a rather narrow range of work. I believe one of the things he was really impressed by was the ... umm ... "healing tool" or something like that?

As far as we are concerned the biggest reasons to upgrade to 5.5 was because of the improvements in InDesign and Acrobat.

But in the line of using only a small part of what Photoshop 5.x can do, maybe describing more specifically the things you use the programs for that you mentioned might be of more help to those who have the more recent versions?

sa547 2012-11-09 22:04

Yep, the Healing Tool and some special retouching tools are great, and then as I'm using CS6, I found out that Photoshop makes better use of the video card. If you have a Wacom tablet, Photoshop got optimized for pens.

I also use InDesign to convert old Pagemaker 7.0 invitation layout files into the new format, and I'm experimenting with it, creating arched text, something that wasn't present in Pagemaker.

However, I haven't used Media Encoder or Bridge, although they came with Photoshop and Indesign.

Since I have 4gb of memory and hence installed Win7 64-bit, the suite is even more responsive.

KholdStare 2012-11-11 05:10

Thanks guys, I read up on the healing tool and that sounds great. I think I'll get it because I do a lot of reconstruction. <3

Flower 2012-11-12 17:51

Very welcome!

As an after note of sorts, I spoke to the office's photoshop guy yesterday and he also mentioned the "bandaid tool" as very helpful. ;)

-KarumA- 2012-11-14 00:59

Most improvements have already been mentioned above, only wanted to add that I also still use CS5. I don't think any major changes have been made towards CS6 so perhaps if it is cheaper then perhaps upgrade towards that. I use it mostly for AEF and many plug in's swapped towards CS5 and no longer support the older CS3 version.

AnimeFan188 2013-01-09 16:17

If you're fond of the old Photoshop/CS2, you can get it for free now:

http://gizmodo.com/5973730/grab-phot...ree-right-here



There are also more free alternatives to Photoshop than ever:

http://gizmodo.com/5974500/10-photos...e-totally-free

Traece 2013-01-09 18:08

I have experience with inDesign and Photoshop as well, although not a whole lot. Not the newest version, but a slightly old one. Like a lot of people have been saying a lot of the newer features are the bandaid, healing tools, and some other special stuff to help you make your shops look cleaner. Nothing like a cat's head on Darth Vader's body and it looks like it's 100% normal. :P

I suspect that what may be good for you overall is the streamlining and improvements to the code. Newer versions should run faster and utilize your computer more efficiently. They should also be less prone to crashing. Since it's an Adobe product, it goes without saying that any update that helps mitigate crashing is an update you need to get. :heh:

Also, I can confirm that tablets work very nicely with newer versions. We have a Bamboo tablet we'll sometimes use with them and it works beautifully. The tablet and the program go together like a mouse and a computer.

CrowKenobi 2013-01-09 20:17

Quote:

Originally Posted by AnimeFan188 (Post 4506154)
If you're fond of the old Photoshop/CS2, you can get it for free now:

http://gizmodo.com/5973730/grab-phot...ree-right-here

Gizmodo hasn't updated their article yet, but there's no "free" CS2 download; it's because Adobe is shutting down the CS2 registration servers, and the "free" download only works if you have a licensed copy of CS2 (as noted in the comments of that article).

Hiroi Sekai 2013-01-09 20:56

I've got a CS6 Suite myself. The Media Encoder is really useful as you can allow something to render (usually in Premiere) as you work on something else. It also saves lost data should your actual program crash during the rendering.

Aside from that, the layouts and whatnot just look more sleek, but if you're not pumping some great hardware into productions it might not be necessary to switch. In either case, if you're on CS3 still, CS6 upgrade might be worthwhile.

AnimeFan188 2013-01-09 22:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by CrowKenobi (Post 4506411)
Gizmodo hasn't updated their article yet, but there's no "free" CS2 download; it's because Adobe is shutting down the CS2 registration servers, and the "free" download only works if you have a licensed copy of CS2 (as noted in the comments of that article).


Bummer. Oh well, at least the alternatives are free.

cyberbeing 2013-01-10 17:00

What CrowKenobi stated isn't entirely accurate.

The public download page was only intended for licensed users of CS2. The downloads and serial numbers themselves are completely unrestricted, and will work even if you've never previously owned or installed a copy of CS2.


Yes, these downloads turn into activated full functional versions of CS2 when using the serial numbers on the public download page.

No, these are not "free" downloads, except for prior licensed users of CS2.

Yes, this is no different than using pirated software if you've never owned a CS2 license.

No, Adobe no longer has any practical way to identify owners of valid CS2 serial numbers, since they unintentionally broke the server which validates CS2 licenses.


Essentially, Adobe provided these downloads on the trust system, hoping the rest of the internet would never notice. Even now that the internet and major media has noticed, they've chosen to leave the downloads publicly available for the sake of CS2 license owners.

Suomi 2013-01-10 21:08

CS6 (Photoshop), the biggest new thing is the 3D feature.
http://www.digitalartsonline.co.uk/t...-new-3d-tools/
I'm not entirely sure since I haven't explored its full potential yet. I used elements 6 for a long time, then CS2, but I don't know how to do any of the new stuff with CS6, so I can't really tell you aside from the 3D. I got CS6 mostly because CS2 was a bit dated and the new CS6 was supposed to be awesome. I have never used any of the other Creative suite programs, except Bridge, which I don't really use much.


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