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-   -   LCD or LED? 60 Hz or 120 Hz? (http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=116684)

Afternoon Tea 2012-12-10 21:43

LCD or LED? 60 Hz or 120 Hz?
 
Well I want a personal TV for my own. I using it for really high quality produced Anime Blu-rays , and Xbox 360 gaming (Halo:4). I'm not really Telly savvy, based off my needs what type of T.V. should I be looking for?

LCD or LED?

60 Hz or 120 Hz?

39,40,42 inch?


Hiroi Sekai 2012-12-10 21:49

LED will give off a brighter and more colourful looking display, whilst more Hertz will probably reduce motion blur in your picture. Size is your personal preference, of course.

Another essential thing to look for is delay time. The less ms of delay in a TV, the lesser the lag you will notice. Kind of like how old CRTs with retro consoles like the NES would react instantly to a button press, while something like Halo will have a very slight lag (depending on the TV). They're different technologies altogether, but it's something to look for.

OLED is recent and pretty crazy. Look into it and buy a true LED TV if you're going to spend THAT much money on it. :3

Wandering_Youth 2012-12-10 21:56

Depends on how much your willing to spend. The color contrast for LED tvs are really high and nice so I would highly suggest them for watching and gaming, but the price is quite big. I personally don'T see a need for 120hz refresh rate. Yeah there is a noticible difference,but imo it doesn't justify the increase in price.

Afternoon Tea 2012-12-10 22:19

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wandering_Youth (Post 4470194)
Depends on how much your willing to spend. The color contrast for LED tvs are really high and nice so I would highly suggest them for watching and gaming, but the price is quite big. I personally don'T see a need for 120hz refresh rate. Yeah there is a noticible difference,but imo it doesn't justify the increase in price.

I see, I've herd 120hz gives a soap opera smoothing effect (more frames the Tv can display then the source has), which could make some of your movies look like a cheap 80's flick. Is it true it would make cinema movies look good since cinema movies are 24 frames per second which 5*24 is 120 hz, on the down side smoothing effect for others? But I'll be watching blu-ray Anime movies (Studio Ghibli, K-ON!! Movie,Haruhi) I don't know if they have theres @ 24 fps. I'm more concerned with making my shows look good instead of gaming/broadcast cable tv.

NoemiChan 2012-12-10 22:27

I seen a big LED TV that has 3D without the need for 3D glasses... If an LED TV could offer that... then I'll go to LED...

synaesthetic 2012-12-10 22:58

Wait, there are still LCD panels with CCFL tubes being produced?

sa547 2012-12-11 00:03

There are, but the older LCD/CCFL system sets are big, cheap and available in some countries due to their proximity to China.

spikexp 2012-12-11 07:14

120hz for tv is not useful, most tv content isn't even close to 120fps.
Go for a simple LED display.

synaesthetic 2012-12-11 07:50

120Hz is only useful if you want 3D (ew) or you plan to play games that can otherwise take advantage of the double refresh rate.

Random32 2012-12-11 12:30

1. Plasma has a lot better picture quality than LCD regardless of whether CCFL or LED backlit, and a lot of it's problems aren't as bad anymore. Unless you are really concerned about power consumption, I would suggest getting one.
2. Size depends on the size of your room and how far you are sitting from the screen.
3. 120Hz is useful pretty much only for 3D.

Wandering_Youth 2012-12-11 14:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by Afternoon Tea (Post 4470219)
I see, I've herd 120hz gives a soap opera smoothing effect (more frames the Tv can display then the source has), which could make some of your movies look like a cheap 80's flick. Is it true it would make cinema movies look good since cinema movies are 24 frames per second which 5*24 is 120 hz, on the down side smoothing effect for others? But I'll but watching blu-ray Anime movies (Studio Ghibli, K-ON!! Movie,Haruhi) I don't know if they have theres @ 24 fps. I'm more concerned with making my shows look good instead of gaming/broadcast cable tv.

If you're concerned about the image quality mainly then I suggest you focus on color contrasts (the highest the number the better) and image sharpness (got to see it in person) forget the Hertz factors because it's pretty much what the people below me have stated. Image quality is depended on the depth of colors and the sharpness of the image the closer to real life the better, imo. The humans eyes can see up to 60-80hz, but any higher than that it's just not possible according to science unless your a cyborg with cybernetic eyes that can see up to 600hz then you would noticed the real difference between 60-120hz, lol. It's also noticed by doctors that viewing such high hz rates can really tired out the eyes, I mean we're already watching stuff on TV or our monitors at 60hz no need to go up to 120hz and give our eyes a massive heart-attack inducing work out or worse a seizure leaving you all leaping and jumping around like a rabid animal on the living room floor. :heh:

Quote:

Originally Posted by spikexp (Post 4470609)
120hz for tv is not useful, most tv content isn't even close to 120fps.
Go for a simple LED display.

Agreed. The images I see on a 120hz look the opposite of smooth and looks rather un-natural to my eyes. I guess it depends on the person viewing the image.

Quote:

Originally Posted by synaesthetic (Post 4470633)
120Hz is only useful if you want 3D (ew) or you plan to play games that can otherwise take advantage of the double refresh rate.

Agreed.

Haikea 2012-12-11 18:48

LED TV is misleading marketing. Both are LCD displays, but there is LED backlight instead CCFL backlight. True LED TV would mean that each pixel has own LED lights.

120 Hz itself shouldn't give any "soap opera" downside effect because it depends from video frame rate and how sharp each frame is. 24 fps would be a really choppy if each frame wouldn't contain motion blur. For example 60 fps is considered often too smooth because camera exposure times have been set so low there is not much motion blur. Human vision gives a weird feeling when motion blur doesn't match to reality or something.

Screen size depends from personal taste and viewing distance because resolution is often same and there is not much video content beyond 1080p anyway and consoles are tied to that anyway (they actually can use lower resolutions like 720p or even lower).

Everyone have unique vision but this chart gives some direction how well people can see pixels.

http://lowtek.ca/roo/wp-content/uplo...tion_chart.png

Plasma TVs could be superior for video content, but they might have issues displaying pixels which stay same for a long time like HUDs in games. I don't know about input lag, but usually TVs don't have priority for that. Some display can minimize input lag by disabling all those "image improving" features.

I have heard that some people might notice flickering with LED backlights or "unstable" image with plasmas. Probably would be best to test different displays somewhere before buying one.

Wandering_Youth 2012-12-11 19:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by Haikea (Post 4471260)
LED TV is misleading marketing. Both are LCD displays, but there is LED backlight instead CCFL backlight. True LED TV would mean that each pixel has own LED lights.

That is true. The "real" LED TVs are OLED TVs, but my gosh are they freaking expensive and rare. They are however very impressive piece of display technology with displays thin and flexible as paper and uses less energy than a flourscent light bulb.

creb 2012-12-11 21:09

I went from paying 13 cents/kwh to almost 50 cents/kwh when I moved for work.

Let's just say that all of a sudden I'm a lot more concious of the energy cost of my gadgets.

From that perspective, LED back-lighting is a no-brainer. :heh:


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