AnimeSuki.com Forum

AnimeSuki Forum (http://forums.animesuki.com/index.php)
-   General Chat (http://forums.animesuki.com/forumdisplay.php?f=6)
-   -   Learn Japanese online (http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=4296)

Eelco 2004-01-05 07:31

Learn Japanese online
 
I'm creating a new online Japanese course at Japan-Studies.com called Japanese 101.

This is not your usual collection of useful phrases, but I'm trying to give you a thorough understanding of the Japanese language and grammar through this course.

Each new issue of The Foreigner will feature a new lesson. I've also started work on the most extensive and easy to use overview of the Japanese grammar on the internet, which I'm hoping to upload parts of soon.

Each lesson introduces a new element of Japanese grammar, while continuing to build on the previously discussed grammar. There are also vocabulary lists and translation excersises on each lesson.

Have a look, and if you have any questions or comments, you can post them on The Forum - Japan associated with the course.

P.S.
We're still looking for sponsors for the site, so we can start to make the site pay for itself. If anyone is interested in advertising on our site, please check out our sign-up form

Shinobu_Maehara 2004-01-05 07:37

There is already a free japanese course online at http://www.japanese-online.com

When I have more time I might take this online course, but are you going to create a better one than this one?

When I first looked at the course I thought it was just very basic.

I hope yours will become a little more User friendly.

Oh BTW, Since you're Dutch like me, will there be a Dutch -> Japanese course?

jakkz 2004-01-05 10:08

hmm i've studied Japanese for 2 years (1 lesson per week)... stopped for 3 years. Now that i find anime my new hobby, i might try to learning it once again. I'll tell you how it goes after i finish your course :)

calavera spain 2004-01-05 10:43

really nice lessons but as i dont have the japanese letters installed i cant see the hiragana and katakana... dont worry iv found this web page to see them

http://www.geocities.com/gnivel4/hiragana_anime.htm

http://www.geocities.com/gnivel4/katakana_anime.htm

Eelco 2004-01-05 10:44

Sorry, no Dutch - Japanese or Japanese - Dutch. I'm gonna stick with English :)

If you have suggestions on how to make the site more userfriendly, please let me know. I'm always willing to improve on what I have.

The course is still in its infacy at this moment. Every issue new lessons will be added, but since it's a monthly magazine, there'll be quite some time between each new lesson. On the up-side it'll give you enough time to work through each individual lesson.

The ultimate goal is to make the best Japanese course on the internet. Step by step, but thorough.

www.japanese-online.com is a great course, and designed for fast results so you'll be able to manage in Japan. But that's really where it ends. It won't teach you the Japanese grammar so you can apply it yourself. What I'm hoping to do is just that.

Unfortunately for now I won't be able to add sound files due to space limitations. But once I get people to sponsor the website, I will increase the space to accomodate those. All I need then is a (cute) Japanese girl to record the speech.

Eventually this course will consist of 35 individual lessons, and a complete overview of the Japanese grammar, which I'm working on right now.

To Calavera:
If you'd like to install Japanese support (and you're not running a pre OS 9 on Apple or Linux) you can check this out http://japan-studies.com/help/#japanesesupport

diabolistic 2004-01-05 11:21

http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~thoureau/japanese.html

This is also a very informative site on learning Japanese.

Blue*Dragon 2004-01-05 12:20

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eelco
Sorry, no Dutch - Japanese or Japanese - Dutch. I'm gonna stick with
English
http://www.theforeigner-japan.com/japsup.htm

well maby that i can work with you and can put Dutch language in it
(if you want it than)

Eelco 2004-01-05 12:52

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue*Dragon
well maby that i can work with you and can put Dutch language in it
(if you want it than)

Japan-Studies.com is an international site, a Dutch version wouldn't work inside it. I'm sorry to disappoint you.

But I appreciate the offer :)

Shinobu_Maehara 2004-01-06 08:14

Luckely I have no problem with English after studying it for over 8 years.
However, a Dutch resource could have been easy towards DUtchies. That might end up serving a small public.

English is fine then ;)

I see you want to cover what I want to learn. the grammar. I want to reach above the dead point where you can learn yourself.

Japanese-online teaches you the tourist thing..

I want to compose my own lines. and if possible grammatically correct.

I don't need to know just how to order a bag of cheese noodles. ;)

I'll be looking foreward to it ;)

Blue*Dragon 2004-01-06 12:36

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eelco
The Foreigner - Japan is an international site, a Dutch version wouldn't work inside it. I'm sorry to disappoint you.

But I appreciate the offer :)

sure bad but good luck with your programe

calavera spain 2004-01-06 12:42

http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/4562221/

its one of my drawings and iv writen kawaii on it but i dont know if it is correct this way or not, iv used the hiragana alphabet

Blue*Dragon 2004-01-06 12:44

they are fine :)

calavera spain 2004-01-06 12:46

thanku :D......

Eelco 2004-01-06 13:40

Actually, you might want to remove the line at the end and replace it with the same character before it. "ka" "wa" "i" "i"

Unless you want to replace them all with katakana, then you can use the line.

calavera spain 2004-01-06 13:42

o ... jejej i will put an other letter in hiragana, but, when do i have to use hiragana and when katakana

Eelco 2004-01-06 15:22

As a general rule Katakana is used for foreign words (from a Japanese viewpoint of course).

Hiragana is used for native words.

However, Katakana can also be used to emphasize a Japanese word. Somewhat like italics. So if you were to put it in Katakana it would be like someone was shouting the word.

You can check here.

diabolistic 2004-01-06 18:10

the only japanese sentence i've strung together on my own is:

"Baka no sushi!"

at first i thought this to be nothing more than random, and common, japanese words strung together, but i was later informed that it means "idiot's sushi."

calavera spain 2004-01-06 18:15

Eelco: thanku next time i will try katakana :) but still i have to copy it to my notebook... ive written another word but the pic is kind of more eechi so i wont post the link......

Shii 2004-01-06 18:23

えっちか?
うほ!いいおとこ!

Roots 2004-01-07 23:10

I looked over your page Eelco, and here's my critique on it (coming from someone who's spent the last 3 years studying Japanese at a university). By the way I haven't looked this over incredibly thoroughly (maybe 5 minutes of browsing or so).


The good:

- Your lesson introductions are well done I think. They explain things clearly, simply, and without unnecessary detail.


- I think the English->Japanese and Japanese->English sections are awesome. Well organized and it helps the learner to practice on their own and cover all the basics from the lesson.


- Your lessons are free :D


The bad:

- I think you present way too much way too fast. I think throwing all of those Kanji at the learner on the first two lessons is an evil evil idea. You have to keep in mind who your audience is. Most of them are probably going to be trying to learn Japanese by themselves for the first time with no previous experience. When you throw out the Hiragana, Katakana, AND Kanji alphabets in the first lesson, they are either going to A. Give up B. Cry or C. Commit harakiri ;)

I would recommend not introducing the Kanji until at least the 5th lesson or so (and even that is a little soon I think). And when you do introduce them, introduce simple, easy to remember characters at first ( such as numbers,  山、 川、 大、 小、 中、 etc). Some of the Kanji you have on there I have only learned recently, and a few I've never even seen before (I know around 600 Kanji or so). I would introduce Hiragana first, and make sure the learner is VERY comfortable with it (ie they can read something in Hiragana without having to look-up characters). Then introduce either basic Kanji or Katakana. Just my recommendation though.


- The most common (and most believe, the best) approach to learning Japanese is through a 'structures' approach. Its how I learned it, and I think it not only helped me then, but knowing those basic structures still helps me now. You can start with the classic "A は B です。 = A is B.", and take it from there (simpler structures at first, gradually building up in complexity). Sure it's cliche, but its proven to be effective and it works. I'm living proof :D

************************************************** ***********

That about sums it up. Those are just my thoughts though, its your site so you can do whatever you want. Keep it up!


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:07.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.