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-   -   Anyone play EVE Online? (http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=43068)

[ ] 2007-02-14 10:52

Anyone play EVE Online?
 
Wondering if anyone else here plays eve online and what they think of it.

Village Idiot 2007-02-14 12:28

Its the best MMORPG on the market. Hands down. No contest.

Just what is EVE about? Well, its a space setting (like Firefly/Serenity) where your only avatar is your starship. You can go anywhere you want in the 5,000+ star systems in the game, which makes up an entire galaxy.

Unlike most MMORPGs, EVE doesn't have levels, or experience. Rather, it have skills. Basically, there are catagories like "Engineering", "Gunnery", "Propulsion", etc, and within each are various skills like "Energy Operation", which gives -5% Capacitor Recharge Time per level, to a maximum of 5 levels per skill. Now unlike most MMORPGs, in EVE, there is no active grind to skills. Rather, you just choose which skill to train, and the game will automatically start training the skill for you, along with telling you how long it will take for the skill to finish. The skill will also train while you're offline, so unless you don't have a skill going, you will always be making progress.

The length of time for a skill completion depends on two things:

1) Your attributes (which you can raise a maximum of +10 each via Learning skills)
2) the Skill Rank (ie, a Rank 3 skill will take exactly 3x the time to finish compared to a Rank 1 skill)

Lower ranking skills can be finished in mere minutes to days for a lv5 skill, while a high ranking skill can take weeks/months to complete.

Note that there are hundreds of skills for you to learn, and its been calculated that it will take over 20+ years to max out each and every one.

Unlike almost all MMORPGs, the beauty of EVE is that skills/levels doesn't matter when it comes to PvP. A person with 40 million SP can still be killed by someone with 5 million SP. For example, if the 40m SP player had maxed out skills for flying Cruisers, Battleships, and Recon Ships, whereas the 5m SP player maxed out skills for flying Cruisers only, then both players are actually even when it comes to flying Cruisers. So just because someone have higher SP doesn't necessarily mean that they'll win every time against a low SP player, just that they will have more options to choose from.

You can be whatever you want to be in EVE. There are no set classes to choose from. Miner, Missioner, Manufacturer, Pirate, Anti-Pirate, Trader, Transporter, etc. You want to be a Miner? Then skill up some Mining/Industry skills, put a few Mining Lasers onto your ship, and hop to an asteroid belt and start mining away. Getting bored and want to shoot something? Skill up some Gunnery and put on some guns, and go hunting. Want to do a bit of everything? Then go ahead, the option is yours.

The economy and manufacturing of EVE is entirely player based, and player created. Almost every item in EVE is made by some other player, with the cost of goods and were goods are sold depends on where the manufacturers decide to sell them on the market. The game controls inflation via the PvP system, where a ship destroyed is gone forever, with the modules equipped on it having a 50/50 chance of being destroyed as well. This keeps the market from crashing, as people continually lose ships/modules.

As for ships, they are what represents your avatar in the game. There are numerous ship types: Frigate, Destroyer, Intercepter, Cruiser, Battlecruiser, Battleship, Recon Ship, Interdictor, etc, all the way up to mammoth capital ships such as Dreadnaughts and Carriers.

Each ship type/class have there own strengths and weaknesses, and have various module slots which is divided up into three different catagories: High/Med/Low, with a possible 8/8/8 slot allocation. Every equipment is either High/Med/Low, with fitting requirements called Power Grid/CPU, which every ship have a set amount of. You can fit whatever you want onto your ship, as long as it meets the slots/fitting requirements.

EVE is completely based on PvP. Simply put, you can be attacked anywhere and everywhere by another player. Though there are systems known as "High Sec/Empire", (0.5-1.0 sec) where an NPC police force known as CONCORD will automatically kill any player that attacks another player, though that doesn't make you immune to being PKed in Empire, you can still die before CONCORD kills them.

As you venture out more and more to the fringe of space, you'll start entering Low Sec systems, which not policed by CONCORD and where you can be attacked by another player at anytime without CONCORD assistence, though if you're attacked at a stargate/station, the sentry guns there will help you provided that you didn't fire the first shot. Player pirates often go to these sec systems, to hunt for other players.

If you venture even further, you'll eventually reach the 0.0 regions, which is completely lawless, or rather, the laws depend on whatever player alliance controls that region of space.

PvP is quick and brutal, yet complicated. Battles are dependant various factors, like ship size, signature radius, speed, gun tracking, shield/armor/hull resistences, ECM, etc. Its really far, far too complicated to really explain unless you try it out for yourself. Destroying a ship will leave a wreck, which contains whatever modules that managed to survive the explosion. Thus there are people whom actually pirate for a living, hunting on fellow players as a source of income.

Also like the skill system, just because someone have a bigger ship doesn't mean that they will always win against a smaller one. For example, if a player in a Frigate (small ship) goes up against someone in a Battleship (largest non-capital ship), the Battleship pilot with Large Guns can kill the Frigate in as little as 1-2 volleys. However, the weakness of Large Guns is that they have bad tracking (basically slow turning rate) if the Frigate orbits around the ship extremely quickly, then the Battleship guns won't be able to track the Frigate, and thus cannot hit the Frigate. During this time, the Frigate can hit the Battleship with its smaller, faster tracking guns, however, its highly unlikely that it will have the fire power to break the Battleship's tank. Is the situation hopeless? No. Why bring in one small Frigate, when you can bring many? If you have friends with Frigates, they can just swarm the Battleship and wear down its tank, and destroy the ship. Now does that mean Battleships are useless against Frigates? No. If the Battleship pilot fits smaller Frigate-sized guns (or various other options), it can then easily hit the Frigates, and destroy them. Though in this case, the Battleship won't have the firepower to go up against another Battleship.

Next we come to the Corporations/Guilds.

A corporation is basically a guild in other MMORPGs. The Corp's goals is whatever the corp decides it to be. Unlike most MMORPGs, where a guild is just really a list of players on a friend's list, a Corp in EVE can control actual territory. In High Sec, the regions are controlled by the four Empires. In low sec/0.0, territory can be claimed by other corporations.

Corporations can also declare war on one another, which allows them to fight openly in low/high sec without CONCORD intervention. This means that if you really don't like another corp, or want their territory, fight/kill/kick them out by force. Or settle it diplomatically, its entirely up to you.

Multiple corporations can also band together, to form an Alliance. An alliance is basically multiple corporations uniting under the same banner. Many alliances claim 0.0/lawless territory as their own, implementing/enforcing their own laws. With possible massive resources, industrial and military powers, they essentially become a player created, player governed empire. Just like with corporations, alliances often declare war on one another for various things, and often leads to entire alliances either kicked back to Empire or disbanding entirely.

Corporations/Alliances can put up Player Owned Stations (POS) to massive Starbases (the same as NPC ones). This is a huge investment because POS/Stations actually appear on the map, and can thus be destroyed/taken over by another entity.

With all this real politics involved, the story of EVE is actually moved and controlled by the actual players. Betrayal, propaganda, and politics all exist and controlled by the players.

Last of all, unlike every other MMORPG out there, everyone on EVE plays on the same Shard. Thats right, some 150,000 players all play in the same universe. Thats right, the same server. Thus there's no jumpping to another server to start over when the going gets hot. Your reputation matters, and everything you do can have consequences. Publically insult another player? Unlike other MMORPGs where they just put you on their ignore list and thats the end of that, no they can war declare your corp and either repeatedly kill you and your corpmates until you leave your corp/corp kicks you out/corp desolves. Or you have someone joining your corp, then the next day realise that he had stolen everything your corp owns and left. Is this griefing? No. Its exactly what the game is about. Real politics. Real reputation. Real consequences. All controlled and dealt with by the players.

Thats EVE for you.

Reika Tsukishima 2007-02-14 14:34

Are EVE Online is so close to X3 Reunion? I've seen its trailer and it looks awesome.


Can it be played in offline mode?

Village Idiot 2007-02-14 15:51

Here's an example of the sheer possibilities of EVE:

http://eve.klaki.net/heist/page-1.jpg
http://eve.klaki.net/heist/page-2.jpg
http://eve.klaki.net/heist/page-3.jpg
http://eve.klaki.net/heist/page-4.jpg

Kalshion 2007-02-15 03:23

Quote:

Originally Posted by Reika Tsukishima (Post 833008)
Are EVE Online is so close to X3 Reunion? I've seen its trailer and it looks awesome.


Can it be played in offline mode?

To answer your first question:

It's not really close; you can mine, you can build (ANYTHING) you can fight, you can trade, it's completely freeform.

The graphics are amazing and it's constant 15k+ player base makes the game even more fun.

As for your second question - no. An MMO means Massive Multiple Online; meaning there is NO offline mode.

fizz 2007-02-15 05:16

Quote:

Originally Posted by Village Idiot (Post 833060)

I have a question: I see there was talk of "old guard" players in that article, so how realistic is for "new guard" or new players to be part of the main game clockworks after spending some time in it?

Also, as you've explained skills don't matter that much in this game, but I still get the feeling that players who started the game just after it got out, as well as first-born corporations, have a fair advantage over other players/corps. So is it realistically possible to "catch up"?

neoko 2007-02-15 08:15

Me and my friend are real fans of freelancer. We love the game, but it's really wayy too short amd small.

My quest is: Will EVE fill the void that freelancer has left us, and beyond?

Village Idiot 2007-02-15 09:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by fizz (Post 833691)
I have a question: I see there was talk of "old guard" players in that article, so how realistic is for "new guard" or new players to be part of the main game clockworks after spending some time in it?

Also, as you've explained skills don't matter that much in this game, but I still get the feeling that players who started the game just after it got out, as well as first-born corporations, have a fair advantage over other players/corps. So is it realistically possible to "catch up"?

Theoretically, you will never, ever catch up to older players in terms of pure SP, but you can still fight them on even terms if you specialize in what you're doing.

Like I said, a 40m SP player with 5m in Cruiser-type skills is equal to someone with 5m SP with everything in Cruiser-type skills. They just get more options to choose from.

A 2 day old newbie with a few skills in a racial Frigate, Propulsion Webs, and Warp Scrambler can be used in any fleet as a tackler (someone whom orbits a target and is equipped with mods that slows them down to a snails pace and prevents them from escaping into warp) for the rest of the gang to kill the target.

Just to note, there's a corporation called Goonfleet that was formed last year that was composed entirely of newbies....2000+ newbies that are challenging the big boys of EVE. Everyone thinks of them as bees and picks on them a lot, but they just swarm you in small, fast, cheap, frigates (back when they were first form, 1200+ Goons all lived in this one, single solar system) and were not considered a serious threat. But many of their members are moving on to Battleships, and within another year, at least 200+ of them will be in capital ships.

They're also in the middle of fighting and possibily killing one of the major alliances in the game.

Thats scary thought.

There's also a some ~400 member alliance called "Red Alliance" (composed entirely of Russians), whom is giving a 2000+ alliance a huge headache.

Basically, in nearly all MMORPGs, you're lead by the hand on what to do next. Get a quest? Go to X location. Finish all the quests? Get a new quest and go to this new location and start all over. In EVE? You get dumpped into this massive universe, and decide for yourself what to do next.

Most MMORPGs = Playground
EVE = Sandbox

neoko 2007-02-17 09:32

EVE sounds mad. I wonder what sort of ping i'll get from Australia.

I might try it out sometime :D

velocity7 2007-02-17 17:42

I'm playing this. Just find me as velocity7 and mail me if you want to catch me. :)

WanderingKnight 2008-08-06 18:12

Back from the dead!

I heard about the core concept of this game, and it sounded so unbelievably good that I had to give it a go. They also have the decency to provide a Linux client, so I guess I'm willing to pay up for an account, even when I have to pay a first-world rate to play... but 20 dollars a month is not much, and since they were kind enough to give us Linux users a chance instead of treating us like a second-class citizens, I think I'll indulge them.

I'm now in the process of learning the game during the trial period, but it feels so vast I'm afraid to get completely lost in the process. Besides, there's always that "too late" factor newbies to an already old and established game have to deal with...

cerrian 2008-08-06 18:39

The learning curve is steep, but you can overcome it by making friends, working with other players by joining a newbie friendly corporation, and making use of the EvE-O forums which is knowledge base gold mine. You're going to have to be proactive in asking questions and meeting people both in-game and on the forums.

You'll quickly realize that although the game is 5 years running, the top tier players are not the ones with the oldest characters. It's usually the people who have a strong social network on which they can rely on to support their activities. You won't be flying a battleship in your first few months, but that's not going to stop you from participating in some of the most important fleet fights flying along side some of the best players in the game. Success in EVE is not measured by who has the most skill points but rather who has the most wealth, power, territory, friends, and/or notoriety. Those are things are easily lost but hard to earn despite the age of your character.

Corporations and alliances rely on fresh incoming blood to maintain their vitality as an organization. The really good organizations will have their own internal training programs for the rookies. For some organizations, there's always a demand to bring in rookies to support their on going activities.

Quote:

Just to note, there's a corporation called Goonfleet that was formed last year that was composed entirely of newbies....2000+ newbies that are challenging the big boys of EVE. Everyone thinks of them as bees and picks on them a lot, but they just swarm you in small, fast, cheap, frigates (back when they were first form, 1200+ Goons all lived in this one, single solar system) and were not considered a serious threat. But many of their members are moving on to Battleships, and within another year, at least 200+ of them will be in capital ships.

They're also in the middle of fighting and possibily killing one of the major alliances in the game.
And here we are a year and a half later. The Goonies not only killed off that major alliance and booted them from the numerous territories they once held, but the Goonies are now the #1 or #2 power bloc today. Who would have thought.

WanderingKnight 2008-08-06 18:41

Shucks, I just found out it's not a native Linux client, but a special packaging with Cedega... meh :/ At least they thought about us.

Mr Hat and Clogs 2008-08-06 23:22

Heh, I haven't played EVE for ages, and it is a lot of fun. I used to just do simple stuff mostly, played for a couple months at a time now and again. It was pretty awesome to see what the big guys got up to though.

But by god, losing stuff on the scale some did would make me want to quit in frustration.. at least for a while. A game is a game, but when you put years of time into it only to see it taken away its like seeing someone taking some prized possession and smashing it on the ground. But give it time to cool off and build it back up again. Then plot, vengeance is a dish best served cold they say.

krisslanza 2008-08-07 08:27

This was a game I was to play years ago, downloaded (on dial-up!) and never got it to work. Though the game looks really good (visually) I'm just not sure if I'd really play it.

For one its P2P. Two, the requirements are rather steep (though I'm sure I could run them... Smoothly is the question). Third, thats a huge download man. XD Fourth, from the videos I saw it plays just kind of like say... Sins of a Solar Empire. Amass fleet, point and click, watch fleet line up and shoot at that other fleet.

Though that fourth is just based on some videos I saw on YouTube.

WanderingKnight 2008-08-07 11:09

Quote:

For one its P2P. Two, the requirements are rather steep (though I'm sure I could run them... Smoothly is the question). Third, thats a huge download man.
Are you sure we're talking about the same game? P2P means peer to peer, not to be confused with MMORPG--two completely different concepts. And the requirements aren't steep at all if you take into consideration the "classic" version (which is the one I'm using by the way), which barely hits the 800 mhz processing power and the 512 MB of RAM. Plus, the classic download is only 600 MB, which is what, four anime episodes?

Zenemis 2008-08-07 12:28

I was in SMASH Alliance, I participated mainly in the removal of RATEL from... space. It involved lots of camping. Slight amounts of fun were had.

I quit after I realised gate/station-camping aren't exactly fun.

krisslanza 2008-08-07 13:05

Quote:

Originally Posted by WanderingKnight (Post 1785442)
Are you sure we're talking about the same game? P2P means peer to peer, not to be confused with MMORPG--two completely different concepts. And the requirements aren't steep at all if you take into consideration the "classic" version (which is the one I'm using by the way), which barely hits the 800 mhz processing power and the 512 MB of RAM. Plus, the classic download is only 600 MB, which is what, four anime episodes?

P2P = Pay 2 Play? :heh:

Hmmm I wasn't aware of that. I just saw the big GB client back when I had like... 2GB free on my HD :eyespin:

Graus 2008-08-08 14:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by krisslanza (Post 1785681)
P2P = Pay 2 Play? :heh:

Hmmm I wasn't aware of that. I just saw the big GB client back when I had like... 2GB free on my HD :eyespin:

Yeah, it's P2P but after a while you can earn the money ingame to pay for timecards.


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