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-   -   What is your school like? (http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=86672)

Tacos 2009-09-26 08:33

What is your school like?
 
I'm a middle school student from China.I studying in my city's foeign language school.My school is very strect I think because most of girls are not allowed to wear long hair and boys should wear very short hair.We're very busy I think.All of student should get to school before7:30 and leave school at17:00.Everyday,my homework costs me 2~3h.
My school is very big.It has three campuses.The campus which I am studying is very far from downtown so it is very inconvenient.
We have a lot of subjects:Chinese,math,English,physics,chemistry,hi story,politics,P.E.,music and art.
I'm curious!I have been to some foreign contry but I have never been to any schools there.So I really want to know what your school is like.
So tell me,please~
P.S:My English is not very good,I'm sorry.
My school's web site,click here

Miko Miko 2009-09-26 08:51

My school is awesome! ^_^

http://www.eckington.net

I go to Eckington School in Eckington. :D
We have to wear a uniform which is:
Black Blazer with logo (Year 7-10 only)
Black v-neck jumper.
Blouse (Shirt)
Black Trousers/Skirt.
Black Socks :rolleyes:
Smart Black Shoes.

It's a nice school :)

Tacos 2009-09-26 09:17

Quote:

Originally Posted by Miko Miko (Post 2666152)
My school is awesome! ^_^

http://www.eckington.net

I go to Eckington School in Eckington. :D
We have to wear a uniform which is:
Black Blazer with logo (Year 7-10 only)
Black v-neck jumper.
Blouse (Shirt)
Black Trousers/Skirt.
Black Socks :rolleyes:
Smart Black Shoes.

It's a nice school :)

We wear school uniforn everyday,too.My school uniforn is a dark blue sult with a white shirt.You know,the uniform in China always has pretty bad quality:frustrated:,especially students'.My uniform is just OK,but maybe it is the best school uniform in my province.
By the way,you like Black Rock Shooter?I like her very much,too!

PrincessFrani 2009-09-26 09:39

My school is pretty much a normal public school. Casual clothes, going to classes, no dressing like a gangster, no fighting, etc. It's a nice school but I get pretty bored by going there at least 5x a week. At least I get to see my friends.:)

Haladflire65 2009-09-26 09:56

I went to several schools...

In Korea:
It was a middle school, for grades 7~9. Ugly grey uniform with plaid skirt and tights. We had 14 subjects: language arts, math, English, Japanese, Chinese, science, social studies, family studies, technology, ethics, chinese characters, phys. ed. We had a test on every single one of them. Yuck. Also for our classes, we stay in one classroom while the teachers come in and out, except for gym, f.s. and tech. The teachers were a little crazy and so were the kids - I'd rather not go back. There were 10 classes per grade, with about 35 in each, so there were about 1000 kids.

In Japan:
The subjects were almost the same as Korea. The uniform was a white polo shirt, navy blue blazer, grey skirt with knee-length white socks. We had rotaries, although without courses, just a set timetable for each class. Two classes per grade; same number as Korea per class, so 250 in our school. Everyone's so nice, and the classes/exams pretty easy. Great school with lots of tradition, even though it was only 10 years old, with squeaky-clean buildings and facilities.

In Toronto:
I go to an all-girl private school now. We have a green uniform - it's apparently our thing. Our No. 1 Dress, which we have to wear on Thursdays, has a green blazer, white dress shirt, green and gold tie, green kilt, green knee socks and black oxfords. Green... Other than that, it's probably your normal private school, with courses, rotaries and all that - I'm also a boarder here, which is fun and special. :D

MeoTwister5 2009-09-26 09:59

I saw someone get brought in on an ambulance the other day and the ER was like in a panic.

Anyway as my Location implies, currently in medical school in thr Philippines. Mondays are spent looking at diseased organs both grossly and microscopically, including dissecting a benign ovarian tumor that had skin, hair and even teeth growing in it (teratoma). Tuesdays are spent figuring out how NOT to kill your patients with either an accidental overdose, the wrong drug or some bizarre adverse reaction. Wednesdays are spent in the medical wards trying to learn how to properly take medical histories because in the vast majority of the time, a proper history means a correct diagnosis. Thursdays are spent differentiating disease-causing microorganisms from each other, and why giving Amoxicillin to person with flue isn't going to work despite what some people think. Fridays are spent practicing how to doa proper physical exam so you don't get sued out of your license for sexual harassment.

JRendell 2009-09-26 10:11

Im in College at the moment. College life in the UK is awesome. Soooo laid back!

Miyuki-ism 2009-09-26 10:16

Location: Canada/Ontario/Peterborough

Name: Adam Scott C.V.I. (High school and Intermediate school.)

regular sized high school for this area, 900 students I think. I can't really say much about the attitude except we're not really into the school spirit, we just want to get school done and over with most of us.

Chaho-Chi 2009-09-26 10:24

Lol I go to a Public school in America.
The typical 'No hats, No Gangs, and No fighting'
School is tough for me since I'm taking a High School Course in 7th grade so I have a lot of homework but it also matter who are your teachers.
We have a system of teams in my school with diffrent teachers and each team. Only time you get to meet other students is during electives.
We have a strict rule of getting to electives on time so they only allow 2 to 3 minutes
(My team is all the way at the back of the school and I have to speed walk all the way to my first elective at the front of the school, School Adminstration always yell at me for getting late :heh:)

The good like I like about going to school is just to see my 6th grade teachers every morning and hanging out with freinds at lunch and the halls.

Po99okie 2009-09-26 12:16

I go to a private highschool in America. No uniforms and the dress code is pretty laid back. The Classes are hard and I get about 2~3hrs a night. The school has a strict tardy policy and two tardies in one class = detention. Some of the teachers are more laid back then others so it depends on what teacher you have on the amount of homework you get. But overall school is pretty fun despite the classes.

Vexx 2009-09-26 12:59

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tacos (Post 2666135)
I'm a middle school student from China.I studying in my city's foeign language school.My school is very strect I think because most of girls are not allowed to wear long hair and boys should wear very short hair.We're very busy I think.All of student should get to school before7:30 and leave school at17:00.Everyday,my homework costs me 2~3h.
My school is very big.It has three campuses.The campus which I am studying is very far from downtown so it is very inconvenient.
We have a lot of subjects:Chinese,math,English,physics,chemistry,hi story,politics,P.E.,music and art.
I'm curious!I have been to some foreign contry but I have never been to any schools there.So I really want to know what your school is like.
So tell me,please~
P.S:My English is not very good,I'm sorry.

To the original poster... wow, this is the first instance I've heard of where the women were required to keep their hair short.

The level of effort and time in your education will probably pay off much more than the pathetic level of requirement most American students have. It is the rare US school that actually has homework, afterschool activities are not encouraged (clubs, band, or sports often cost hundreds of dollars to join), and the requirements for graduation frankly suck (hardly any science or math, no foreign language). Often even if a student wants to excel, the resources to do so are non-existent (limited advanced classes, no equipment, poor library, poor highly filtered Internet).
Students who manage to do well are the rare highly-self-motivated... the majority who need some guidance just don't get any unless an individual teacher goes the extra mile to inspire them.

I'd say be glad you're in a country ascending to world importance in the 21st Century. My country seems determined to waddle into a long dark age. Heh, do I sound morose today? As you can see, many of the anime fans here not yet in college are among the few who strive for more in their education so it isn't all dark. However, I tell such students to be "okay with immigrating" depending on their goals in life.

As for myself, my undergraduate work was in electrical engineering (digital controls, electromagnetics) and physics, ended up with a BSEE from Rice University (Texas).
I'm currently working to get my masters in education and a teaching certificate. I volunteer at the local high school (club support and tutoring). Unfortunately, the current economic meltdown vaporized the funds I was using for school and my son's financial aid for his college plunged when his school's endowment crashed because of the economy --- so I'm not able to afford my school this year in order that he be able to continue.

Siddyus 2009-09-26 13:06

I study at (TUM)Technische Universität München. The best university in Germany IMO.

JRendell 2009-09-26 13:31

Quote:

Originally Posted by Siddyus (Post 2666534)
I study at (TUM)Technische Universität München. The best university in Germany IMO.

What do you study?

-KarumA- 2009-09-26 14:22

I'm in my final year but our school turned into a police corp regulated zone when 2 schools fused together..
My school isn't all that bad, the classrooms look like gray paved bunkers with only computers lined along the wall and a big desk in the middle for the teacher. In every hallway you'll see a security guard whose daily job seems to be telling kids that they can't eat/drink in the hallways (even though the vending machine is there also)
All our teachers seem to be people that are about to hit retirement, they can't handle a normal middle school class anymore and so teach semi adult people
The classes are alright though, it is a film and multi media study and so you get to make a project every period in the categories you study in, but it was because of my class's constant whining that they finally decided to change school policy. I picked the course to get more insight in animation and film, but I get website making classes as well which don't interest me at all. And so in my final year they decided we can pick the category in which we want to make our final project which we have 6 months for, I decided to make a cellphone commercial but already the crappy budget my school lives with is causing problems. They have money to build a 9 story high building for another school but they can't build a green-screen room for their students..

I'll be glad when I have my diploma, for 4 years I've been fighting for separated and specialized classes in the subject you want to be taught in and only now are the changes coming. Not only is the other school in complete lack of discipline and have I been very offended to be treated like some 1st year middle scholar who breaks things and yells at teachers but the overall school system sucks.. The government forces me to work 2 part time jobs to pay for my education because I live at home with my parents and because of that they assume that they will pay for all my fees while I am given a measly 70,- a month while having to pay over 1000,- per school year.. Really for all the things we had to complain for that amount wasn't worth it.. However I plan on finishing it, get my diploma and get into a higher university with it and pray that I can afford it, in the meantime I love trolling the security guards, but I heard they are going to add security gates at the front entrance to check for weapons...
I think this is because of what's been happening in Germany or the incident where some lunatic got away from prison and killed a man in a school, either way this policy is going too far (you know this if a security guard tells you to eat your sandwich in the cafeteria when all you want to do is put it in your bag which is in the classroom so you can eat it on your travel home.. the guy didn't even believe me)

chikorita157 2009-09-26 14:22

I'm no longer in High School, but I used to attend West Essex Regional Schools until June 2008 and they became worse year by year by mismanagement with the principal, incompetent teachers and the school have numerous bomb scares.

Now I am currently attending Rutgers University - Newark (as a Accounting Major) and it's alot better than high school, since college education is alot better than the high school education because of poor funding of US high school systems and the No Child Left Behind Act which hinder US Education.

Chaho-Chi 2009-09-26 14:24

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vexx (Post 2666524)
To the original poster... wow, this is the first instance I've heard of where the women were required to keep their hair short.

The level of effort and time in your education will probably pay off much more than the pathetic level of requirement most American students have. It is the rare US school that actually has homework, afterschool activities are not encouraged (clubs, band, or sports often cost hundreds of dollars to join), and the requirements for graduation frankly suck (hardly any science or math, no foreign language). Often even if a student wants to excel, the resources to do so are non-existent (limited advanced classes, no equipment, poor library, poor highly filtered Internet).
Students who manage to do well are the rare highly-self-motivated... the majority who need some guidance just don't get any unless an individual teacher goes the extra mile to inspire them.

I'd say be glad you're in a country ascending to world importance in the 21st Century. My country seems determined to waddle into a long dark age. Heh, do I sound morose today? As you can see, many of the anime fans here not yet in college are among the few who strive for more in their education so it isn't all dark. However, I tell such students to be "okay with immigrating" depending on their goals in life.

All the problems you just listed only matter which school you go to.
Again I'm taking a high school course (Algerba 1) in math and I'm taking advanced language arts. My school doesn't limit advance classes that much.(And I haven't seen anyone thats smart enough to go past the classes in taking anyways)

Yes my school is very poor right now and we can't afford much equipment and computers since our school system funding has been cut out $400,000
but I've seen charter schools right now that have plenty of learning equipment and supplies.

I'm not sure about graduating but you might be right about that.

TinyRedLeaf 2009-09-26 14:41

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tacos (Post 2666135)
I'm a middle school student from China.I studying in my city's foeign language school.

I'm curious!I have been to some foreign contry but I have never been to any schools there.So I really want to know what your school is like.
So tell me,please~

P.S:My English is not very good,I'm sorry.

您好. 欢迎您加入AnimeSuki. :)

(Hello, welcome to AnimeSuki.)

As you can tell from my age (34), I'm no longer in school, but I do have very fond memories of all the schools I've attended, from primary through secondary schools to junior college and university.

Education in Singapore, like in China, is also quite strict. Or, at least, it was in my experience. Perhaps, it would more accurate to say that it is highly competitive and, for many children, very stressful. Children are "streamed", from an early age, into various levels of education. That is, depending on how well you performed in your examinations, you could go into a "gifted" stream, an "express" stream or a "normal" stream.

The original intention was actually good. Our government thought that, by separating students according to their academic ability, the more "intelligent" students get to learn faster, while the "slower" students get the benefit of more time and attention. Unfortunately, the side result is that this system can be very harmful to a child's self-esteem. Although no one says it outright, Singapore society deems those children who enter the "normal" stream to be stupid. These children have a tendency to grow up believing that they are hopeless, and are therefore less motivated to study.

It doesn't help that those who go into "elite" schools tend to go on into prestigious and high-paying jobs, thus reinforcing the societal belief that, in order to "succeed" in life, a child must go into the "best" possible school in Singapore. Children who graduate from these "elite" schools are generally nice people, but there are many who are, unfortunately, very arrogant, believing themselves superior to those "less qualified" than they are.

All in all, the Singapore government has belatedly realised the problems it has created within our education system. The Ministry of Education (MOE) has been trying, in the past few years, to encourage greater creativity in the classroom, instead of an emphasis on memorisation and rote learning.

There has also been, in recent years, less emphasis on learning science and engineering, to encourage more students to develop their interests in the arts and humanities. I hope this trend will continue.

==========

I attended a public primary school from age seven to 12. During this time, I was among the top pupils of the school. From Primary 1 to 3 (age seven to 10), I was the top in standard for each year. I think, as I grew older, I became more dumb :heh:, but I still managed to be among the top three in my class and standard for the remainder of my primary school years.

My father was from China. His father, my grandfather, managed to get him out of the country, along with my father's two younger twin brothers, during the Cultural Revolution. My father was apprenticed into the textiles trade in Hong Kong, and eventually emigrated to Singapore, where I was born.

Probably because of this, and also because I entered secondary school (ages 13 to 16) during the 1980s, when the whole world was excited about the rapid rise of the "Asian Tigers", I enrolled in what is arguably the top "Chinese" school in Singapore. (The other Singaporeans in AnimeSuki can probably guess which one it is.)

It is funny, how life turns out. I entered a school with a proud tradition in Chinese education, but I was actually more fluent in English than in Mandarin back then. In fact, I struggled with Mandarin and I still do today. But deep in my heart, I am proud to be Chinese. I may think in English, but my heart beats in Chinese.

My school motto was 自强不息 ("Never resting, even when you know you are strong"). As a student, I hated it! It sounded so corny. As an adult, though, I now appreciate the wisdom of those four words. It is a reminder to never rest on my laurels, to never be so arrogant as to think I know it all, that there is always something new to learn.

To be humble — that's one of the best lessons I've ever learnt from school.

Finally, there is junior college (ages 17 to 18). My junior college is actually "related" to my secondary school, so many of the values were the same. But there is one major difference: girls! Ahh... young hearts. Nope, I never did get a girlfriend in junior college, but there were plenty of crushes, of course!

More importantly, though, junior college was when I finally discovered my love for English Literature, thanks to a group of very special teachers, who showed me how to enjoy the language in all its complexity and artistry.

That's why today, I work as a writer/editor in English. Be that as it may, my culture and my life experience is still entirely Asian, entirely Chinese. I enjoy being a "bridge" between two cultures, East and West, old and new.

And I credit this all to my schools, and to all the teachers I've had the privilege of learning from. :)

Dilla 2009-09-26 15:02

I attended a high school in a small, rural town that no one as ever heard of. Wasn't bad, they did an adequate job in preparing me for the rest of my life. Two levels of foriegn language were required(albeit the selection was small), and at least one science and math was needed every year. I didn't take any AP courses, but they were readily available. Sports, the top four-(American) football, soccer, basketball, and baseball were free. I don't know about golf, tennis, and the like; buying your own equiptment was probably needed there. The library wasn't all that great to be honest, it had nice computer labs, but the book selection wasn't all that big. That's a recurring problem in North Carolina, despite all the big universities. The state is last in employed librarians and number of libraries in the US. I would love for that to change.

College. . .well, there nothing really special about it. It's just your typical American public university, though I haven't heard about any epic frat parties that are notorious around this period of a person's life. I find it strange because Charlotte University isn't a exactly a small school. It's the 4th largest in attendence out of 16 public universities in the state and the fastest growing.

It's quiet. It's nice, but if I was a party hopper I would be disappointed.

Kitsu 2009-09-26 15:07

Quote:

I study at (TUM)Technische Universität München. The best university in Germany IMO
Well, not quite right if you are into languages and philosophy IMHO

klowny 2009-09-26 16:08

My old high school was located in the "hood", i didn't hate the school but i didn't like either. There was usually a fight everyday and gang activity near the school. I didn't get in trouble with anyone nor did they start trouble with me so i had a pretty boring high school experience :D


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