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Old 2007-11-28, 19:04   Link #21
SeijiSensei
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Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Mucking about
Age: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiachopvutru View Post
Does that mean only one computer need to activate the Samba thing? (and yep, I've never tried Windows networking before..)
Yes, the one(s) running Linux if you want to serve files and printers from it.

Quote:
Hmmm... Can't say I necessary understand what those "state" and "stateless" things are... It doesn't matter right now, though. (I enjoyed the read but I admit I didn't quite understand the whole thing )
The web protocol, HTTP, is "stateless" in this sense: When you request a web page from a server, the server sends you the page, and any objects linked to it like graphics. When it's finished, it forgets all about you. That's why places like AnimeSuki need to use "cookies" to keep track of you when you're logged in. A cookie is a small file stored on your computer that, in this case, contains a unique code the identifies you (actually your browser) to the server. When you visit a page, the server looks in its database of current sessions, finds the one that matches the code in your cookie, and continues its dealings with you.

Other types of protocols establish persistent "sessions" with a remote machine. In an FTP session, you log into the remote server and stay connected for a while even when you're not transferring anything. When you send a new command to the server, it know immediately who you are because a persistent link exists between you and the server.

AnimeSuki sessions may look like the latter, but that's because of some clever programming that enables the server to track people as they come and go.

Maybe that was clearer; maybe not.

Quote:
Back on topic (I think): If a printer doesn't have Vista as its supported operating system, it's best not to buy it, right? My sister's laptop runs Vista. Well, I also see one with "Certified for Windows Vista(TM)"
As Ledgem said, saying a machine is "certified for Vista" usually means that it ships with drivers tested for Vista. If you have a printer in mind that doesn't say "certified for Vista" on the box, check the manufacturer's website first to see if Vista drivers are available there. If you're still looking at HP printers, most of them use a common driver language so even fairly generic HP drivers should work fine for the things you'll be using a printer for.
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Old 2007-11-29, 00:28   Link #22
teachopvutru
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Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Location
Age: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ledgem View Post
I don't really trust those things too much, especially given all of Windows Vista's blunders. If it has the certified sticker on it, then it likely means that it's been tested and/or there should be drivers available for it.

Unless it's some amazingly complex printer, it should work even if it isn't certified for Vista. Your sister may need to tell her computer to use generic print drivers instead of HP's fancy ones, but that only makes a big difference if you're printing pictures and want a lot of control over how the printer handles the colors and such. I'd guess that not too many people use those functions. Additionally, it's likely that the printer will have Vista drivers developed for it some time in the near future.
Well, seeing that it can only print in Black & White and will mostly do document anyway, there's no need for the "HP's fancy one." Btw, is the generic print driver the one download from HP web and the "fancy one" is the driver comes with the disc?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SeijiSensei View Post
Yes, the one(s) running Linux if you want to serve files and printers from it.



The web protocol, HTTP, is "stateless" in this sense: When you request a web page from a server, the server sends you the page, and any objects linked to it like graphics. When it's finished, it forgets all about you. That's why places like AnimeSuki need to use "cookies" to keep track of you when you're logged in. A cookie is a small file stored on your computer that, in this case, contains a unique code the identifies you (actually your browser) to the server. When you visit a page, the server looks in its database of current sessions, finds the one that matches the code in your cookie, and continues its dealings with you.

Other types of protocols establish persistent "sessions" with a remote machine. In an FTP session, you log into the remote server and stay connected for a while even when you're not transferring anything. When you send a new command to the server, it know immediately who you are because a persistent link exists between you and the server.

AnimeSuki sessions may look like the latter, but that's because of some clever programming that enables the server to track people as they come and go.

Maybe that was clearer; maybe not.
Maybe, lol I was confused because I was thinking of it only in term of file-sharing...



Quote:
As Ledgem said, saying a machine is "certified for Vista" usually means that it ships with drivers tested for Vista. If you have a printer in mind that doesn't say "certified for Vista" on the box, check the manufacturer's website first to see if Vista drivers are available there. If you're still looking at HP printers, most of them use a common driver language so even fairly generic HP drivers should work fine for the things you'll be using a printer for.
Thank you both for the clarification
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Old 2007-11-29, 03:11   Link #23
grey_moon
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Just in case no one has mentioned it and to confuse the matter even more. Some of the HP JetDirect cards allow printing via FTP. You drop a postscript file onto a share via FTP and the printer prints it.
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Old 2007-11-29, 04:10   Link #24
teachopvutru
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Join Date: Feb 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grey_moon View Post
Just in case no one has mentioned it and to confuse the matter even more. Some of the HP JetDirect cards allow printing via FTP. You drop a postscript file onto a share via FTP and the printer prints it.
Thank you very much for the confusion. D:<

*drink energy drink*
So essentially, what you mean is some JetDirect cards utilize both the FTP protocol and the printer sharing thing. And now, instead of only being able to print a document on a printer that's connected wirelessly, it's also possible to print a document from somewhere else to a printer that's connected ... *huff* wir- *huff* *huff* *huff*lessly *huff*

*brain consumed all energy*

Am I right? >=D
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