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Old 2007-12-12, 16:33   Link #61
Vexx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dxon View Post
So what i'm always calling: "Sticky Rice" is called mochi? I learned a new thing!
Anyone ate a fish that inflates itself with water and gets a spiky ball? (Whats it name again?)


P.S.: Sorry for last off topic post. I'll try to keep it ontopic.
No, "sticky rice" is just a group of rice varieties that tend to stick together when cooked unlike some long grain and wild rice that stays separate even after cooking. Mochi, on the other hand, is something *made* from rice. Its been pounded to oblivion and resembles some kind of white glue.

You'll often see it sold in stores in little flattened ball shapes with sweet red bean paste inside. Its used to make a number of treats (as is the ahn - sweet red bean paste).

Fugu (blowfish) is one of those risks that I deem easily avoidable and I haven't missed much. o.O
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Old 2007-12-12, 18:08   Link #62
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Originally Posted by Kyuusai View Post
Actually, the spiked fish (the porcupinefish aka the blowfish) is a close relative of the fish that's known for being a dangerous delicacy in Japan, which is the Tetraodontidae, aka the pufferfish/the balloonfish/fugu.

I've never had it, but I have a feeling the thrill of danger and necessary skill of the chef (resulting in a high cost of labor) is what creates demand for it.
It's not just the thrill of danger and elitism that creates the demand. The poison actually has a slight narcotic effect which affects the brain's ability to taste food.

Interesting fact, the fish has to be cut very close to the poison so that some poison can enter the flesh of the fish to enhance the flavor, but not too close or the gourmet will die. The closer the knife comes to death, the better the fugu tastes. What a delicious poison! If the chef plays it safe, the palate will be disapointed. This is the real reason that the chef needs an extremely high level of skill.
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Old 2007-12-12, 21:07   Link #63
Kang Seung Jae
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyuusai View Post
*shudder* MOCHI.

All you inexperienced fans of Japanese food out there, BEWARE mochi. Do not cook it unless you have a contingency plan in place. For at least your first try, don't cook with anything (anything meaning utensils, cookware, rooms of your house) that you can't easily throw away.

I can spend all afternoon typing about how thick and sticky mochi is, about how impossible it is to clean, but you just can't know.

In my efforts to teach her about her Japanese heritage, I tried to make daifuku for my sister. After meeting utter failure in our attempts to make paste out of azuki beans, we moved on to the mochi. Mochi made with rice flour, not counting cooling time, can be made in fifteen minutes. Supposedly.

I started at 4:00pm. At 5:30 I had to send my sister home empty-handed, as it still wasn't nearly cool enough to work with.
I finally finished cleaning the kitchen at 11:00pm.

Some notes: Corn starch is no substitute for potato starch. You can try a hand-held electric mixer, but pray the motor doesn't burn out. If you pick up a piece of the mochi before it's cool (and by that I don't mean "cool enough to not burn", but "at least, but preferably below, room temperature), it will stick to you and not come off. You can walk outside and try to throw it away, but, like a wad of bubble gum in a cartoon, it won't come off. And good luck cleaning anything the mochi has touched (aside from the pan which SHOULD have been greased and God help you if it wasn't). You can't put the mochi in the garbage if you aren't taking it out soon, because it will rot. You can't put it in the sink or down the garbage disposal, because it will clog. All you can do is repeatedly soak it in hot water and scrape and scrub, dissolving it layer by layer until it's all gone. That's if you start washing immediately. If you let it dry, good luck ever getting it clean.

I would rather fight a tar baby.

When we got done cooking, my sister informed me that she remembered that she'd had mochi once already, and didn't care for it. If I hadn't been so exhausted, she probably wouldn't be here today.
All I have to say is: Ouch.

Fortuantely, I never had problems with 餅.
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Old 2007-12-13, 02:07   Link #64
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The Japanese Food I have had in my life are: Onigiri(I love the rice with vinegar), Fuguzousui, senbei(especially kabukiage), katsu-don(my fav Jap food), Sushi(especially inari-sushi), sukiyaki, okonomiyaki, takoyaki, taiyaki, tendon, udon, yakisoba, ramen(anyone ever had CHICKEN RAMEN/chikin ramen?), omochi, tofu, dango(go mitarashi dango!).. etc etc.
Alot of stores in Japan I go to have Melon Soda everywhere and also in every vending machine(which is everywhere) and it tastes so nice!! I really like Hai-chu too!

Just to say that Japanese food and lollies and drinks are better then anything else I had
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Old 2007-12-13, 02:14   Link #65
Kang Seung Jae
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The more I read this thread, the more I feel that many Japanese food are similar to Korean.


I was thinking "I've eaten pretty much everything the people are saying here.... is this just me, or is most Japanese food eaten outside Japan close to Korean stuff?"


This thread sure is an eye-opening thread.
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Old 2007-12-13, 02:22   Link #66
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Well pretty much Japanese everything are similar to Korean...
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Old 2007-12-13, 02:25   Link #67
Kang Seung Jae
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -PoLLuX- View Post
Well pretty much Japanese everything are similar to Korean...
Food-wise. Almost everything else are opposites, from drinking manners (Japan: always keep the glass full, Korea: Pour only when glass is empty) to the position of chopsticks to asking for more side dishes (In Japan, you have to pay, while in Korea, you can pretty much ask for more side dishes as you want).
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Old 2007-12-13, 03:52   Link #68
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Not to pick or anything ... but Japan and Korea have a long long history of spending lots of energy differentiating themselves from each other

Several of my friends are of Korean heritage and yeah, there's a LOT of overlap and similarity in food dishes but with some interesting differences (korean food tends toward more pepper spices, for one). Of course, a lot of japanese and americans like Kimchi in various forms (I think my local asian mart carries about 20 varieties).
We are actually lucky enough to have a couple of Korean restaurants (as in actual Korean and not the American 'teriyaki/bento/etc' faux japanese faux korean things that infests many shopping strips). We eat at them in rotation with our visits to Korean-Indian-Chinese-Japanese-Italian-Texmex-Guatemalan-... ... well, we like to eat food from pretty much anywhere on the planet.

I'd list some of my favorite Korean dishes but unfortunately the names escape me -- I tend to like the more "folksy mom made 'em" dishes though.
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Old 2007-12-13, 10:55   Link #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kang Seung Jae View Post
The more I read this thread, the more I feel that many Japanese food are similar to Korean.


I was thinking "I've eaten pretty much everything the people are saying here.... is this just me, or is most Japanese food eaten outside Japan close to Korean stuff?"


This thread sure is an eye-opening thread.
As much as I enjoy much of Japanese cuisine, I think the primary difference between Japanese and Korean food is that Korean food tastes good.

Not that Japan doesn't have some delicious food that I constantly desire, but to compare, Japanese food is a zen garden on the tongue, while Korean food is a party for the mouth.

More salt, more spice, more oil... More yum!
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Old 2007-12-13, 11:23   Link #70
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I am a mania for takoyaki!!! argh, i need to take a 30mins train to eat those in my area and there is like only 3 in a box?! Whats are those toppings anyway? Pretty tasty toppings
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Old 2007-12-13, 11:47   Link #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyuusai View Post
As much as I enjoy much of Japanese cuisine, I think the primary difference between Japanese and Korean food is that Korean food tastes good.

Not that Japan doesn't have some delicious food that I constantly desire, but to compare, Japanese food is a zen garden on the tongue, while Korean food is a party for the mouth.

More salt, more spice, more oil... More yum!
Haha (eek). Anyway, I'll poke at the "tastes good" (though I know what you mean).
You're right in that most traditional japanese food has more subtle flavor whereas the Korean dishes I've tried are bolder and spicier. The zen garden versus party-time metaphor is pretty apt.

Maybe we should start a Korean foods thread.... if only because I always have trouble remembering the *names* of the dishes I like.
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Old 2007-12-13, 12:01   Link #72
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Is it me or does Japanese don't really eat lot of land meat? Because if I think about it I never really heard of Japanese food that is made out of cows, pigs, or chicken. And I would really like to eat real Japanese food, not some Japanese restruant that is has all Hispanic chef cooking all the food, because those foods were pretty bad. I suppose if I want to eat real Japanese food I guess I have to go to Japan, like the Chinese food in America are pretty bad, but I remember eating Chinese food in China, now those were some amazing dishes. Of course the Korean food in the US is really not good as the Korean food in Korea.
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Old 2007-12-13, 12:22   Link #73
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Well... think about it.... a small island nation doesn't have a lot of space to devote to large edible land mammals. The country is a fishing nation and a lot of the protein is fish. However, there are a lot of chicken dishes and pig dishes so I'm not sure why you've missed those. Most Japanese restaurants have them.

Yakitori, chicken teriyaki, a variety of chicken and egg over rice dishes.

Tonkotsu is one pork dish that springs to mind ... but pork and chicken are toppings for a lot of noodle/rice dishes. You'll rarely see a *chunk* of meat. Usually the meat is served as bits and cubes or slices.

Beef is expensive and highly prized ... so Kobe beef and "beef bowls" are rather popular japanese dishes.
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Old 2007-12-13, 12:30   Link #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrestrial Dream View Post
Is it me or does Japanese don't really eat lot of land meat? Because if I think about it I never really heard of Japanese food that is made out of cows, pigs, or chicken. And I would really like to eat real Japanese food, not some Japanese restruant that is has all Hispanic chef cooking all the food, because those foods were pretty bad. I suppose if I want to eat real Japanese food I guess I have to go to Japan, like the Chinese food in America are pretty bad, but I remember eating Chinese food in China, now those were some amazing dishes. Of course the Korean food in the US is really not good as the Korean food in Korea.
Meat isn't uncommon in Japan (there are LOTS of dishes that feature it), but it certainly isn't the center of every meal like it is in many other places.

Nationality isn't a determiner of the quality of food. I've eaten Japanese food made by Mexicans or Koreans that beat the Japanese run shops in town, and Mexican food made by Chinese folks that tasted excellent. Of course, just based on likelyhood of them knowing how it's done right, a native might have an edge. I was very fortunate to grow up eating real Japanese food, and spend some of my working years eating genuine Korean food made by a friend's mother when I bummed lunch off of him as he cleaned his parents pool hall/karaoke bar (speaking of whom, if you are reading this, GET IN TOUCH. How am I supposed to contact you when you move and change your number?)

It's not necessary to go overseas to sample cuisines, but it isn't a bad excuse!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
Haha (eek). Anyway, I'll poke at the "tastes good" (though I know what you mean).
Sometimes, after weighing statements to know the least offensive way to state something, you have to go for the shock value anyway.
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Old 2007-12-13, 12:33   Link #75
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I don't agree that Korean food taste better, but it certainly have stronger taste.
Which appeals to the american tongue more than the subtle tasting Japanese food.

The best dish to come out of Korea, IMO, is yakiniku BBQ with kimuchi. Not healthy, but certainly very tasty.
Hmm.... yakiniku sounds really good right about now....
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Old 2007-12-13, 13:01   Link #76
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Originally Posted by Terrestrial Dream View Post
And I would really like to eat real Japanese food, not some Japanese restruant that is has all Hispanic chef cooking all the food, because those foods were pretty bad. I suppose if I want to eat real Japanese food I guess I have to go to Japan, like the Chinese food in America are pretty bad, but I remember eating Chinese food in China, now those were some amazing dishes. Of course the Korean food in the US is really not good as the Korean food in Korea.
I think you're making way too broad a sweeping statement. There's good food and bad food to be had in America of any ethnic persuasion. You have to know where to go (usually in my tactics that means following where the first gen immigrants go to eat). My joke is that if I'm the only "white guy" in the asian restaurant - that's a good sign (same for mexican or indian).

There's no genetic predisposition to preparing food, so your statement about "hispanic chefs cooking all the foods bad" *sounds* racist, BUT I will say though that I've found through personal experience that people (especially 1st or 2nd gen immigrants) cooking their own ethnic food seem to *care* more about the quality.
There's a sushi conveyor belt shop near me run by some very nice Koreans who hire mostly a variety of Hispanic staff. The sushi results are *very* unpredictable and as I watch them prepare it - I can tell the workers really just don't care. When it gets bad enough, there's a sudden turn over in staff.

As a result, even though I prepare japanese, indian, and mexican dishes quite aptly as a white guy -- I tend to go out of my way to eat at and support ethnic restaurants run by that ethnic, especially if they're first or second gen immigrants as they just seem to *care* more about the authenticity.

Now *chinese* eatery is tough because even first gen restaurant owners seem quite willing to "americanize" their dishes (which annoys the hell out of me)... but like I said, watch where the first gen people go to eat and follow them.

I guess the moral of the story is that if you're eating at Taco Bell or Panda Express -- you're not eating "mexican" or "chinese", you're eating corporate food.
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Old 2007-12-13, 13:04   Link #77
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Well, 1st gen chinese restaurants that serve both Americans and Chinese usually have a "separate" chinese menu.
They have standard "americanized" menu posted behind and above the counter, but they also have a paper form old-school menu all written in Chinese, and have traditional chinese dish on them. So unless you know Chinese, you can't even order them.

BTW, I've seen 1st gen Chinese restaurants with Mexican cooks. It was a very popular store among the 1st gen Chinese customers.
Heck I've even seen Japanese restaurants with Udon-serving mexican cook, and it tasted just fine.
I've had better Japanese food cooked by hispanic cooks than Korean or Chinese run stores.
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Old 2007-12-13, 13:24   Link #78
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Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
I think you're making way too broad a sweeping statement. There's good food and bad food to be had in America of any ethnic persuasion. You have to know where to go (usually in my tactics that means following where the first gen immigrants go to eat). My joke is that if I'm the only "white guy" in the asian restaurant - that's a good sign (same for mexican or indian).
The problem is that I live in Connecticut and well it's really hard to go anywhere without car so I can't really go and find a good restaurant. And well another problem is that there is only really sushi restaurant and I really am tired of them, since my dad makes sushi for living. I am sure there are great Japanese restaurant but I don't think it's anywhere near I live.
Quote:

There's no genetic predisposition to preparing food, so your statement about "hispanic chefs cooking all the foods bad" *sounds* racist, BUT I will say though that I've found through personal experience that people (especially 1st or 2nd gen immigrants) cooking their own ethnic food seem to *care* more about the quality.
There's a sushi conveyor belt shop near me run by some very nice Koreans who hire mostly a variety of Hispanic staff. The sushi results are *very* unpredictable and as I watch them prepare it - I can tell the workers really just don't care. When it gets bad enough, there's a sudden turn over in staff.

As a result, even though I prepare japanese, indian, and mexican dishes quite aptly as a white guy -- I tend to go out of my way to eat at and support ethnic restaurants run by that ethnic, especially if they're first or second gen immigrants as they just seem to *care* more about the authenticity.
Well my mistake for sounding racist, but those Hispanic chef (this was in New York) I saw them cooking and well kinda similar to what you saw, those chef weren't really caring about the food that they were cooking.

Quote:
Now *chinese* eatery is tough because even first gen restaurant owners seem quite willing to "americanize" their dishes (which annoys the hell out of me)... but like I said, watch where the first gen people go to eat and follow them.
Well I did went to one Chinese restaurant where lot of first gen were there and my family were the only Korean there. That was the one restaurant I remembering went and the food was good as the one I ate in China, but other resturant I been to, well they were practically americanized Chinese food.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyuusai View Post
Meat isn't uncommon in Japan (there are LOTS of dishes that feature it), but it certainly isn't the center of every meal like it is in many other places.

Nationality isn't a determiner of the quality of food. I've eaten Japanese food made by Mexicans or Koreans that beat the Japanese run shops in town, and Mexican food made by Chinese folks that tasted excellent. Of course, just based on likelyhood of them knowing how it's done right, a native might have an edge. I was very fortunate to grow up eating real Japanese food, and spend some of my working years eating genuine Korean food made by a friend's mother when I bummed lunch off of him as he cleaned his parents pool hall/karaoke bar (speaking of whom, if you are reading this, GET IN TOUCH. How am I supposed to contact you when you move and change your number?)

It's not necessary to go overseas to sample cuisines, but it isn't a bad excuse!
I suppose, but I never had a Japanese food that was made by a Japanese, so I tend to think that Japanese food by Japanese would be better, since they would care more about the food quality.
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Old 2007-12-13, 13:48   Link #79
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Looking back over this thread, I realize that it's lacking links for deprived folks to order Japanese food items from.

For those of you lacking a local Asian grocery (or, like me, have Asian groceries with everything BUT Japanese items), there are options for ordering online.

By far, the easiest ordering experience is from Asian Food Grocer:
http://www.asianfoodgrocer.com/

If you need something more specialized, Maruwa might have it.
http://www.maruwa.com/index_e.html

Beyond those, there's also Katagiri, koaMart, and Amazon.com

Quote:
Originally Posted by aohige View Post
I don't agree that Korean food taste better, but it certainly have stronger taste.
Which appeals to the american tongue more than the subtle tasting Japanese food.
Well, I was being a bit silly and don't really think Korean food is better, just that it tends to have stronger, more flavorful tastes (as you said). That has ups and downs, though: Korean food, like Chinese food, tends to venture into the realm of "frightening" more often than modern Japanese food.
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Old 2007-12-13, 15:31   Link #80
Vexx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrestrial Dream View Post
The problem is that I live in Connecticut and well it's really hard to go anywhere without car so I can't really go and find a good restaurant.
That *would* be a problem ... I recall spending a few weeks in a certain Midwestern state that thought "corn boiled to mush" was a proper vegetable and most of the residents may not have ever even *met* an asian.... the only asian fare to be had were those places scarily titled "Chinese & American Food" (hint: run run away)

Quote:
Well my mistake for sounding racist, but those Hispanic chef (this was in New York) I saw them cooking and well kinda similar to what you saw, those chef weren't really caring about the food that they were cooking.
Wasn't dinging you for the remark ... I've just anecdotally experienced the same thing (but I have found the occasional "chef of a different color" who prepared the food just fine (that's a Wizard of Oz reference in case that sounds odd)).

Quote:
Well I did went to one Chinese restaurant where lot of first gen were there and my family were the only Korean there. That was the one restaurant I remembering went and the food was good as the one I ate in China, but other resturant I been to, well they were practically americanized Chinese food.
That is sort of my "check the customers out" tactic. If I see a lot of Indians frequenting an Indian restaurant, that's a great "first checkmark" to decide whether to eat there.

Quote:
I suppose, but I never had a Japanese food that was made by a Japanese, so I tend to think that Japanese food by Japanese would be better, since they would care more about the food quality.
Right, that's not *always* true.. but its a fair checkpoint for choosing between restaurants.

Sometimes my wife and I will watch America's Test Kitchen which is usually pretty good for recipes and kitchen equipment testing. However, they steer into the pasture often with asian dishes. You know you're in trouble when the first thing they do is change all the ingredients because, for example, you might have to work a bit to find shitake or the right kind of vegetable.
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