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Old 2007-12-14, 16:37   Link #81
telperionflower
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Pittsburgh area, Pennsylvania
Age: 26
Spoiler for Recipe for vegetarian curry (if you want it to not be vegetarian, and you know anything about cooking, you can adapt the recipe, but I'm vegan, so this is what I use):
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Old 2007-12-31, 00:12   Link #82
bschultz
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wow that sounds really good.
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Old 2007-12-31, 19:06   Link #83
babybro
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keitaro View Post
Yes it did originate from China but Ramen is a whole new dish reorganized. So you cannot say Ramen is a Chinese dish because you cannot find anything like Japanese Ramen in any Chinese restaurant.
Incorrect, Bamiyan, which is a dominant chinese restuarant located here in japan, host ramen. As well, the chinese district located in sakuragicho in yokohama has restuarants which also has ramen.
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Old 2007-12-31, 19:16   Link #84
Vexx
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 57
Keitaro was probably making sweeping generalizations based on his local experience and he's right in that the Japanese took an idea for "noodles" from China and "re-invented" the idea as Ramen.... which the Chinese are no doubt re-absorbing and then transmogrifying it yet again.

I will say, finding "ramen" in a chinese restaurant is kind of like finding "hot dogs" and "french fries" in a Vietnamese restaurant ... its a concession to the occasional customer who ought to be smacked about the head for not trying new things Actually, its a bit more like finding kimchi in a "japanese" dish restaurant I guess.

The advent of cross-cultural contamination also is making it even more difficult to say some dish is of culture "X" or "Y" .... kind of like saying pasta is actually Chinese and the Italians just borrowed the idea.
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Old 2008-01-05, 08:02   Link #85
Yaoi_Daisuki
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Age: 25
anyone ever tried chazuki (or something spelt similar to that?) Is that dessert or something?

I went to this japanese restaurant located in my country last week. You know, sometimes the picture in the menu look real small, i couldnt figured it excalty and assumed to be some sort of soup. I ended up getting a bowl of rice soaked with tea with wasabi and nori floating on it. oh mine . .

anyway about the ramen thingy, there are quite a handful amount of chinese restaurant which serve "ramen" or rather we call it "lamian" instead. of course you have to go to the right store, you dont go a sushi store and ask for ramen too. they arent very common although, probably due to the fact that there are a huge variety of noodles, banmian, lamian, kokomian etc etc . . but they arent that rare too.

Well both of them use the same character 拉麺 but pronouced slight differently and taste differently . . to me (its similar to the difference between regular short grained rice and jiponica, they are world apart to me but some people cant tell much difference) I see them as a entire different thing besides the fact that both of them are using the same characters and done in a very similar way. As for which come first, i dont know
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Old 2008-01-05, 14:28   Link #86
tripperazn
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I think you're talking about ochazuke

I've never tried it, but Japanese food is very hit-and-miss with me, so I hate to experiment...ikura is just >.<

Yup, I think we were also talking about ramen a few pages back. The original Chinese 拉麺 (la mien), is white/ivory colored, very long, and very straight. The name comes from the making of it, la=pull mein=noodles. They're noodles made by folding and pulling a single piece of dough repeatedly.

We call "ramen" 日本拉麺 to make the distinction. That's more yellowish and curly, definitely not made in the same way. It tastes very different from the other version, much more so than short-grain vs. japonica IMO.
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Old 2008-01-20, 06:29   Link #87
Potatochobit
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This is more Asian than specifically japanese but you can substitute specific japnaese ingredients to give it a more distinct 'japanese' feel

Potato's egg noodle soup
simple, easy, and it's NOT instant

What you need:

#1: frozen sliced pork (or fresh if available)
-basically, its hotpot, bulgogi, shabushabu slices. you can use beef, but if you do use beef broth

#2: Chicken boullion, Knorr brand is best (beef if beef slices)

#3: Fresh egg noodles, or you can use ramen noodles (I prefer chinese egg noodles, you can
buy them in the asian super market usually near the vegetables or soy milk, thin yellow noodles in clumps in the package, must be refrigerated, each clump is a large serving)

#4: additions: what you like in your soup, vegetables, japanese fish cake, etc.

#5 two pots, one medium pot for making instant ramen size, and one large pot for boiling noodles.
one straining ladle, usually metal with a large head that has lots of holes. like you see on TV.

OK here is what you do:

you need two pots
in the pot for the soup base, add 2-1/2 cups of water ( up to 3 cups if you add lots of meat)
bring to a boil- drop in the meat (1/4 pound sliced pork up to 1/2)
cook for about 8-10 minutes
Scoop off any large clumps of fat residue that will float to the top

while the meat is cooking at a boil, start the 2nd pot with about 4-6 cups boiling water

OK, now that it's been about 10mins, look at the meat, it should be darker, looking cooked, if not cook it a little longer.
Then drop in 1 cube of the chicken bouliion. the water is still boiling.
stir it every so often as it dissolves. about 5-8mins.

now we are almost done! drop in whatever else you like now! green onions, fish cake, etc.

while the boullion is cooking, Take one clump of noodles, and drop it in the other boiling pot.
IMPORTANT: fresh egg noodles are NOT like Sphagetti! they cook super fast!
after 2-3mins CHECK the egg noodles, they should be floating (or look like it in a shallow pan. take a piece out and taste it. IF ITS MUSHY its overcooked!

take your ladle and scoop out your noodles into a bowl!
now scoop out some meat and other additions and put it on top the noodles!
now pour the broth!

wallah! Dinner is served!
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Old 2008-01-20, 12:13   Link #88
Lighto-Kun
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Cool actual recipes. Gets out pots, pans, and everything in between.
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Old 2008-01-24, 05:25   Link #89
Marina
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Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seattle
Age: 28
Just a quick question for the knowledgeable:
In several shows I've seen them drop a raw egg into a bowl of noodles. After looking this up, I concluded it was
"Tsukimi udon – "Moon-viewing udon." Topped with raw egg, which poaches in the hot soup."
Usually I drop the egg in while I'm cooking to poach the egg to my liking, but how cooked would the egg get if I did the whole 'drop it in after the noodles are already in the bowl' method? I don't think I'd be a fan of it being too close to raw...
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Old 2008-01-24, 06:36   Link #90
Tri-ring
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Join Date: Oct 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marina View Post
Just a quick question for the knowledgeable:
In several shows I've seen them drop a raw egg into a bowl of noodles. After looking this up, I concluded it was
"Tsukimi udon "Moon-viewing udon." Topped with raw egg, which poaches in the hot soup."
Usually I drop the egg in while I'm cooking to poach the egg to my liking, but how cooked would the egg get if I did the whole 'drop it in after the noodles are already in the bowl' method? I don't think I'd be a fan of it being too close to raw...
It's usually pretty raw even if you cover it with broth and noodles for later unless you are eating "Nabeyaki Udon" using those clay pots.

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Old 2008-01-24, 08:09   Link #91
Dorfl
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Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: The dog gossips too much.
Terribly, terribly raw, that's what you get. I tried cracking an egg onto a hot bowl of ramen once and it just wouldn't cook. I ended up putting into the microwave about 5 times before finally throwing it away.
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Old 2008-01-24, 09:31   Link #92
EXEs
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Hong Kong
Age: 22
True, poaching the egg is preferred over the cracking of the egg into the cooked ramen. Although, I enjoy the taste of raw egg mixed into noodles, but that's just me, I'm odd.

Does anyone know what's the name of the Japanese food where they crack a raw egg on top of the rice? It tastes bloody excellent.
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Old 2008-01-24, 17:34   Link #93
Vexx
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Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
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raw eggs are less dangerous than they used to be but there's still the risk of salmonella.

These days what you want is for the eggs to take on the texture of the ones in egg drop soup, wispy tendrils.

I usually add the egg towards the end of the noodle boiling period. I add my seasonings after I've pulled it off the stove while its still damned hot.

Same practice for Udon... (though my wife prefers the eggs poached or hardboiled separately and then just placed on top of the udon).

Crap.. brain fart... I know the egg on rice dish... but I'm blanking on the name. Its a very common 'rural dish'. I want to say its a form of donburi (oyakadon?)

A lot of dishes like this, my wife translates as "end of the week specials" (you throw in whats laying in the cupboard). Its like her miso soup ... we call it Super Buffed Miso because she adds slices of beef and things that send it about halfway to shabu-shabu.
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Old 2008-01-24, 19:30   Link #94
Tri-ring
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Join Date: Oct 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EXEs View Post
Does anyone know what's the name of the Japanese food where they crack a raw egg on top of the rice? It tastes bloody excellent.
It's "Tamago-kake gohan" literary translated, rice with egg poured on top.
By the way, you usually beat the egg with a dash of soy-sauce before you pour it on the rice.

As for the cooked egg version it's "Tamago-don".

Vexx
"Oyako don" is cooked chicken and egg combo donburi, "Oyako" means parent and child, if you substitute chicken with other variety of meat(usually pork) then it's called "Tanin donburi" Tanin means strangers. If you place Kamaboko it is called "Okame-don".
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Old 2008-01-24, 19:49   Link #95
Vexx
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Ah.... I seem to recall my wife's family calling it something else but 'tamago-kake gohan' makes obvious sense. My sansei wife has discovered over the years that most of the japanese she knows is "1930s" japanese (when both sets of grandparents immigrated to the US) and probably transmogrified (the running gag in her family is that they speak "tex-nip" alongside the "tex-mex" spoken in much of Texas).
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Old 2008-04-06, 15:43   Link #96
Tommy
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Join Date: May 2003
Location: Scottsdale, Arizona
Age: 31
I really want to make some Katsudon.

Doing some research on the net has come up with limited results, I've found recipes but they haven't been very detailed. It would be awesome if someone made a detailed english instruction video and posted it on youtube.
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Old 2008-04-07, 07:40   Link #97
LiberLibri
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Location: Akihabara, Tokyo, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tommy View Post
I really want to make some Katsudon.

Doing some research on the net has come up with limited results, I've found recipes but they haven't been very detailed. It would be awesome if someone made a detailed english instruction video and posted it on youtube.
I found a cooking video though the instruction is not in English.
http://www.manma-miya.jp/recipe/2417/2417_1.asx
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Old 2008-11-11, 14:32   Link #98
pepper_begs
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Yoshinoya Beef Bowl Clone

Hi Guys,

Yoshinoya Beef Bowl has a string of Resturants (or at least used to) on the West coast. I liked their version of a Beef Bowl.

Can some one supply a recipe that would get me close to it? Its a simmered dish and might lend itself to bachelor cooking.

What kind of beef do I need to cook a beef bowl? I think its called fatty beef.

Thank you for any info.
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Old 2008-11-11, 15:17   Link #99
Eggs in a Bottle
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Join Date: Oct 2008
From the first posts regarding curry, ain't Japanese curry "sweet" rather than in any way "hot" or even "spicy"?

Like I googled Japanese curry and came up with a recipe of a curry sauce with apple pieces in it

Edit: Yeah people already posted that hot curry is uncommon.
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Old 2008-11-11, 17:38   Link #100
Mystique
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Join Date: May 2008
Location: In the eastern capital of the islands of the rising suns...
It has a milder taste than let's say indian curry, but they still have
sweet, medium sweet and spicy flavours in the shops, if you were to go and buy any packs.

This is a cool thread, I know I'll be back here scrouging for recipies later.
Food I plan to learn.
Nikujaga
Tempura (I know the batter mix, but frying it perfectly is a whole other ballgame)


Improve on:
Yakisoba
Okonomiyaki
Curry (by this i mean using the cubes and adding my own meat, veg and potatoes)

That's all for now, I'll see how I go with attempting yakisoba for the first time this week :P
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