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Old 2008-02-14, 18:34   Link #21
Ledgem
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Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 28
The static isn't really that bad. As I mentioned before, you'll probably know if you're at high risk for static, because you'd feel it (and it's "painfully" obvious, haha... pun intended).

Quote:
Originally Posted by tiachopvutru View Post
1) The Conductivity thing - since electricity can't travel well on insulator, should I wrap rubber bands around my fingers?
2) Static shock is caused by a large difference in static electric buildup between the two objects in contact(?) - so I drain static electric buildup on my body my touching something metal?
3) Avoid excessive movement as to not have too much static electric buildup - i.e. not to do a CaramellDansen to avoid damage to the product?
4) Avoid dry day (ugh... winter)
1) That won't do anything. If you have a lot of static buildup on your body, it'll simply jump around the rubber. If you can wrap your ENTIRE body in rubber and have no cracks, maybe that'd work. But that's not realistic.

2) Touch anything that is grounded and not insulated. Just as a review, I believe that every country has three-pronged electric outlets. The third prong is the "ground" - it doesn't supply any electricity, but it takes away excess electric buildup. If you touch a metallic object that is plugged into the ground source, you're essentially transferring any buildup that you have to the ground (getting rid of your buildup). A large-enough object that isn't plugged into a ground could also act as a ground source, as it's unlikely that you could overload it with your body's static in a short period of time.

3) This only matters if you're in a high-friction environment. Wooden floors pose barely any risk, whereas a shag carpet (very long material/high rise carpet) will give you static after just a few steps. Low-cut carpets are OK, but be careful when working over any carpet. Try to work over concrete/stone/wooden floors if you're going to be moving around a lot. If you're just sitting in one place, nothing's going to happen even if you're on a carpet.

4) Don't worry too much about the weather, unless you're working outside

Honestly, if you just ground yourself you'll be fine. What I usually do is just stick my foot on the edge of my metal computer case while working to keep grounded. If I get up and walk around, I touch the computer case (a metal part) again before touching anything else. When working with tools, I always touch the tool to a metal part of the case before using it. Even those are probably overkill, but I've never had a problem with static - and I work over low- and mid-cut carpets.
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Old 2008-02-14, 19:13   Link #22
teachopvutru
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Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Location
Age: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ledgem View Post
The static isn't really that bad. As I mentioned before, you'll probably know if you're at high risk for static, because you'd feel it (and it's "painfully" obvious, haha... pun intended).
I would love to keep building up the static electricity, and for a while not keeping contact with anything (except the ground, of course), and try to create lightning. That probably isn't possible but well, my little dream.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ledgem View Post
2) Touch anything that is grounded and not insulated. Just as a review, I believe that every country has three-pronged electric outlets. The third prong is the "ground" - it doesn't supply any electricity, but it takes away excess electric buildup. If you touch a metallic object that is plugged into the ground source, you're essentially transferring any buildup that you have to the ground (getting rid of your buildup). A large-enough object that isn't plugged into a ground could also act as a ground source, as it's unlikely that you could overload it with your body's static in a short period of time.
You basically answered the question I have been wondering. Too bad I don't have anything to plug into that 3rd hole, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ledgem View Post
Honestly, if you just ground yourself you'll be fine. What I usually do is just stick my foot on the edge of my metal computer case while working to keep grounded. If I get up and walk around, I touch the computer case (a metal part) again before touching anything else. When working with tools, I always touch the tool to a metal part of the case before using it. Even those are probably overkill, but I've never had a problem with static - and I work over low- and mid-cut carpets.
Yea, I suppose what I did when I assembled the computer was overkill, too, since I pretty much followed your example. (to add to that, I sometime stopped midway just to put my hand on the case... even though my foot was already on it)

Well, the stuffs I order will come tomorrow, I think. No School please. (that last one was on a whim so... )

And thank you very much for the reviews.

EDIT: Actually, the newegg website says they are already delivered. I haven't check for my householder to see if they are actually the ones who received them, but under the Detail part, there's the message: MET CUST WOM

EDIT2: Alright, I just put the internal hard drive and the enclosure together. Thank you very much for the help.
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Last edited by teachopvutru; 2008-02-16 at 01:21.
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