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Old 2008-11-21, 00:10   Link #881
ZephyrLeanne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bhl88 View Post
lol now that's tasty.
Especially with Tomoyo's English, only with the Yoshino Yuusuke treatment.
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Old 2008-11-21, 04:17   Link #882
Yukinokesshou
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandomGuy View Post
There's a group of female otaku at the school where I teach, and they seem to be much more open about their interests than the boys. (Either that, or the boys are more embarrassed about confiding in me, while the girls don't care). They seem to be very into things like Lucky Star, Suzumiya Haruhi, and a sizable amount of shonen series with prettyboy characters. I'm also beginning to suspect that they're closet fujoshi as well, which at 14 is a little too young in my book, but I'm sure there are American yaoi fangirls that age, too.
It was actually my female friends at school who introduced me to the bishoujo genre One of them was a translator for Chinese fansubs of Air TV (which I liked); a couple others were role-playing the girls from Shuffle! (which I simply couldn't stomach).

In fact, many of my female friends are big fans of the Key games (Air, Kanon, Clannad), but the only anime that my male friends seem to appreciate are Prince of Tennis, Full Metal Alchemist and Death Note (which the girls also like). Meanwhile, I've recently been drawn towards Josei stuff like Nodame Cantabile and Honey and Clover... partly due to my mum's influence

It just goes to show that the "gender stereotypes" (shoujo, shounen, seinen, josei, etc.) targetted by the anime/manga industry aren't always true. Though maybe they're more relevant in Japan than in Hong Kong and Taiwan!

P.S. In case you couldn't tell, I am male.
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Old 2008-11-21, 04:23   Link #883
ZephyrLeanne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yukinokesshou View Post
It was actually my female friends at school who introduced me to the bishoujo genre One of them was a translator for Chinese fansubs of Air TV (which I liked); a couple others were role-playing the girls from Shuffle! (which I simply couldn't stomach).

In fact, many of my female friends are big fans of the Key games (Air, Kanon, Clannad), but the only anime that my male friends seem to like are Prince of Tennis and Full Metal Alchemist. Meanwhile, I've recently been drawn towards Josei stuff like Nodame Cantabile and Honey and Clover (partly due to my mum's influence ).

It just goes to show that the "gender stereotypes" (shoujo, shounen, seinen, josei, etc.) targetted by the anime/manga industry aren't always true. Or maybe it's just the case amongst Hong Kongers and Taiwanese!

(P.S. In case you couldn't tell, I am male.)
AH NO. Males in my Singapore friends circle LOVE CLANNAD for dumb-Sunohara and Tomo-pyon's uber kick.

I couldn't stomach SHUFFLE either. Neither did my friends. Male OR female.

Prince of Tennis and Full Metal Alchemist are aimed at males, but I found no interest in them. My friends do like them, however.
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Old 2008-11-21, 04:27   Link #884
Yukinokesshou
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Originally Posted by ShimatheKat View Post
AH NO. Males in my Singapore friends circle LOVE CLANNAD for dumb-Sunohara and Tomo-pyon's uber kick.

I couldn't stomach SHUFFLE either. Neither did my friends. Male OR female.

Prince of Tennis and Full Metal Alchemist are aimed at males, but I found no interest in them. My friends do like them, however.
Well, I like Clannad too! =p

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique View Post
Maybe you're just used to extreme discipline from HK days?
Haha, I don't think so. But it's true that I can live without partying, unlike a lot of people in the UK. (Just give me my daily half-hour of anime or J-drama!)
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Old 2008-11-21, 04:29   Link #885
ZephyrLeanne
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Originally Posted by Yukinokesshou View Post
Well, I like Clannad too!
Allright there! Are you following up with the After Story?
I suggest you start with Ep 5 actually. That's the first side story that actually matters. Although Ep1-4 were important, they were more about Sunohara. That gave it a slow start, actually.
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Old 2008-11-21, 05:12   Link #886
Risaa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yukinokesshou View Post
In fact, many of my female friends are big fans of the Key games (Air, Kanon, Clannad), but the only anime that my male friends seem to appreciate are Prince of Tennis, Full Metal Alchemist and Death Note (which the girls also like). Meanwhile, I've recently been drawn towards Josei stuff like Nodame Cantabile and Honey and Clover... partly due to my mum's influence

It just goes to show that the "gender stereotypes" (shoujo, shounen, seinen, josei, etc.) targetted by the anime/manga industry aren't always true. Though maybe they're more relevant in Japan than in Hong Kong and Taiwan!
While on the subject, Prince of Tennis has a significant female fan base in Japan, mostly for um, particular reasons. (Mostly fujoshi with active yaoi imaginations.)
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Last edited by Risaa; 2008-11-21 at 05:13. Reason: feels dirty using the "naughty" emote. Ew.
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Old 2008-11-21, 05:15   Link #887
ZephyrLeanne
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Originally Posted by Risaa View Post
While on the subject, Prince of Tennis has a significant female fan base in Japan, mostly for um, particular reasons. (Mostly fujoshi with active yaoi imaginations.)
Uhuh. That I heard too. There're aren't around my current Japanese residence .(wait, it's in Okinawa's City Center anyway.) But back in Setagaya, there were a few.
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Old 2008-11-22, 04:37   Link #888
LiberLibri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShimatheKat View Post
Uhuh. That I heard too. There're aren't around my current Japanese residence .(wait, it's in Okinawa's City Center anyway.) But back in Setagaya, there were a few.
You should visit Ikebukuro (in Tokyo).
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Old 2008-11-22, 09:35   Link #889
ZephyrLeanne
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Originally Posted by LiberLibri View Post
You should visit Ikebukuro (in Tokyo).
OHHH NOOOOO. They've been MOVING ABOUT! Oh s**t, that's worse than the Falun Gong/Scientologists people in Tokyo/Singapore/Canada/wherever. Man, last I heard, their HQ was at Harajuku, then SHINBASHI!



Must be going about the Yamanote.
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Old 2008-11-27, 23:28   Link #890
bhl88
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Quote:
Random Guy:
They seem to be very into things like Lucky Star, Suzumiya Haruhi, and a sizable amount of shonen series with prettyboy characters.
Do they like the female characters like Haruhi, Konata, Tsuruya-san, etc. or the male characters Kyon, Koizumi, Minoru?
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Old 2008-11-28, 03:23   Link #891
ZephyrLeanne
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Originally Posted by bhl88 View Post
Do they like the female characters like Haruhi, Konata, Tsuruya-san, etc. or the male characters Kyon, Koizumi, Minoru?
Mainly (my area) Tsuruya, Sasaki and Tachibana for the guys and Koizumi for the girls.
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Old 2008-11-28, 05:43   Link #892
Yukinokesshou
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This is a a mock-up of an admission interview conducted by the Osaka University of Economics and Law (I believe the student wants to study law)...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21aj-G3mRbs

Even though I come from Asia myself, I'm frankly surprised at how very stiff and stilted this entire procedure is.

I was interviewed at several medical schools in Hong Kong and the UK, and none of them were half as mechanical as this one.

What is most striking is how the Japanese interviewers naturally assume a "superior" attitude. They don't bow in return and don't even stand up when the interviewee enters. The respect is very obviously one-sided.

Whereas the interviews I attended were formal in their own way, there was a very pervasive atmosphere of mutual respect. I was treated as an equal, a gentleman. Interviewers came to the door to greet us, shook our hands, addressed us by name and thanked us.

All of my interviewers also tried their best to put us as ease... at Hong Kong University, my (Chinese) interviewer actually said "loosen up a bit, don't be so tensed" when I sat down in a similar manner to the girl in that video! At Cambridge, the interviewers sat us down in big, comfy chairs and assumed a conversational attitude. On the other hand, any pretence of concern expressed by the Japanese interviewers ("and now, please take care in returning home") comes across as very artificial and scripted.

So... I wonder whether this mock interview says anything about Japanese culture?
Or is it actually a difference between the sort of mannerisms doctors and lawyers are expected to have? (bedside manner vs. courtroom manner, respect for patients vs. detached professionalism)

Last edited by Yukinokesshou; 2008-11-28 at 05:59.
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Old 2008-11-28, 07:01   Link #893
ZephyrLeanne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yukinokesshou View Post
This is a a mock-up of an admission interview conducted by the Osaka University of Economics and Law (I believe the student wants to study law)...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21aj-G3mRbs

Even though I come from Asia myself, I'm frankly surprised at how very stiff and stilted this entire procedure is.

I was interviewed at several medical schools in Hong Kong and the UK, and none of them were half as mechanical as this one.

What is most striking is how the Japanese interviewers naturally assume a "superior" attitude. They don't bow in return and don't even stand up when the interviewee enters. The respect is very obviously one-sided.

Whereas the interviews I attended were formal in their own way, there was a very pervasive atmosphere of mutual respect. I was treated as an equal, a gentleman. Interviewers came to the door to greet us, shook our hands, addressed us by name and thanked us.

All of my interviewers also tried their best to put us as ease... at Hong Kong University, my (Chinese) interviewer actually said "loosen up a bit, don't be so tensed" when I sat down in a similar manner to the girl in that video! At Cambridge, the interviewers sat us down in big, comfy chairs and assumed a conversational attitude. On the other hand, any pretence of concern expressed by the Japanese interviewers ("and now, please take care in returning home") comes across as very artificial and scripted.

So... I wonder whether this mock interview says anything about Japanese culture?
Or is it actually a difference between the sort of mannerisms doctors and lawyers are expected to have? (bedside manner vs. courtroom manner, respect for patients vs. detached professionalism)
This is because in Japan, the STUDENT (or whoever is the one below/inferior/lower-status) is expected to show respect. What mutual respect? Japan is the land of samurai, warriors, and the like.
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Old 2008-11-28, 20:50   Link #894
LeoXiao
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Yeah, interviews must suck, for both parties. I get the feeling that by the end everybody's pissed off with each other.

Quote:
that's worse than the Falun Gong
hey my family is in that group. respect it plz.
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Old 2008-11-29, 11:23   Link #895
bhl88
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Is it hard to modify cosplay clothes for casual?

Are there any clothing modification shops in Japan?
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Dang it Avalon, you c(XD LOL)-block Shirou and Reinforce, but don't protect his mind in other ways? What is wrong, you woman?
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Old 2008-11-30, 09:31   Link #896
kyon.haruhi.suzumiya
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Join Date: Nov 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yukinokesshou View Post
This is a a mock-up of an admission interview conducted by the Osaka University of Economics and Law (I believe the student wants to study law)...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21aj-G3mRbs

Even though I come from Asia myself, I'm frankly surprised at how very stiff and stilted this entire procedure is.

I was interviewed at several medical schools in Hong Kong and the UK, and none of them were half as mechanical as this one.

What is most striking is how the Japanese interviewers naturally assume a "superior" attitude. They don't bow in return and don't even stand up when the interviewee enters. The respect is very obviously one-sided.

Whereas the interviews I attended were formal in their own way, there was a very pervasive atmosphere of mutual respect. I was treated as an equal, a gentleman. Interviewers came to the door to greet us, shook our hands, addressed us by name and thanked us.

All of my interviewers also tried their best to put us as ease... at Hong Kong University, my (Chinese) interviewer actually said "loosen up a bit, don't be so tensed" when I sat down in a similar manner to the girl in that video! At Cambridge, the interviewers sat us down in big, comfy chairs and assumed a conversational attitude. On the other hand, any pretence of concern expressed by the Japanese interviewers ("and now, please take care in returning home") comes across as very artificial and scripted.

So... I wonder whether this mock interview says anything about Japanese culture?
Or is it actually a difference between the sort of mannerisms doctors and lawyers are expected to have? (bedside manner vs. courtroom manner, respect for patients vs. detached professionalism)
If you're Chinese or Korean, naturally they tend to look down on you. Unless you can awe them with your English or something.
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Old 2008-11-30, 16:08   Link #897
Risaa
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I'm not looking for a fight but I feel the need to be nit-picky about your usage of "natural". Saying that "they 'naturally' tend to look down on Chinese or Korean" implies that all Japanese do this, and that they can't help that they do this - it's "natural" for them to. Also, it relieves individual Japanese from responsibility when someone implies that it's merely natural for them to do so (once again, "they can't help it - they're Japanese").

Normally I wouldn't address such a small thing about a post but this kind of word usage *is* a basis for racism - and racism makes pandas cry. Please be careful about your word choice next time... //drops it and leaves now
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhl88
Is it hard to modify cosplay clothes for casual?

Are there any clothing modification shops in Japan?
1. It depends on the actual cosplay outfit. Sailor fuku are pretty easy, for example...

2. You mean like the tailor?
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Old 2008-11-30, 22:33   Link #898
kyon.haruhi.suzumiya
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Originally Posted by Risaa View Post

2. You mean like the tailor?
The tailor... no, they usually don't do this kind of things. You should go to either Akiba (in Tokyo), Nihonbashi (in Osaka) or Osu Kannon (in Nagoya, where the World Cosplay Summit 2008 was held) and look for a cosplay shop or something.
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Old 2008-11-30, 23:53   Link #899
Cut-Tongue
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyon.haruhi.suzumiya View Post
If you're Chinese or Korean, naturally they tend to look down on you. Unless you can awe them with your English or something.
Ho-ho! Snap.

My impression is that jobs are an even bigger part of your identity in Japan than other parts of east Asia, so the interviews are particularly nasty. Also, humility and an ability to swallow your pride (read: take shit every day day in day out until youre promoted past the point of the shit-giver, then take it some more from the next level up) is a plus in the Japanese working world.
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Old 2008-12-02, 00:50   Link #900
bhl88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Risaa View Post
1. It depends on the actual cosplay outfit. Sailor fuku are pretty easy, for example...

2. You mean like the tailor?
1.) Yay! Now I can have a Haruhi uniform modified for kodona, right?

2.) Yeah. I was looking for those... a tailor who can modify such.

Already have the following items planned:
Looking at the following shops:
So I can enjoy and buy stuff quickly, I'm planning on what to do already.

Akiba / Nakano Broadway -> Harajuku -> Saitama -> *whatever パトリシア・マーティン "パティ" mentioned in the anime*

Quote:
Originally Posted by kyon.haruhi.suzumiya View Post
The tailor... no, they usually don't do this kind of things. You should go to either Akiba (in Tokyo), Nihonbashi (in Osaka) or Osu Kannon (in Nagoya, where the World Cosplay Summit 2008 was held) and look for a cosplay shop or something.
List a few shops. Needed to enjoy to the max.
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Dang it Avalon, you c(XD LOL)-block Shirou and Reinforce, but don't protect his mind in other ways? What is wrong, you woman?
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