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Old 2008-12-26, 23:31   Link #341
Keiichi_chan
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I always feel like chiaki and nodame are LEAGUES more entertaining than the bit players that surround them. So yeah, I didnt feel like either cast was anything to write home about. Still they're interesting enough, I just wish soooo much time wasnt spent developing characters that are just "somewhat interesting/entertaining" to begin with.

Besides, that the ending was good enough that I still want to continue with next season and still have the high hopes I had going into this season. The source material is really phenomenol and I can't wait to see how the whole thing wraps up. This is easily the best romance available right now.
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Old 2008-12-27, 05:53   Link #342
Sorrow-K
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keiichi_chan View Post
I always feel like chiaki and nodame are LEAGUES more entertaining than the bit players that surround them. So yeah, I didnt feel like either cast was anything to write home about. Still they're interesting enough, I just wish soooo much time wasnt spent developing characters that are just "somewhat interesting/entertaining" to begin with.
This is one of the few problems I had with the first season, but the difference between Pari-hen and the first season is that while the first season had "supporting" characters like Mine, Masumi, Streseman and Harisen-sensei who had their roles in the story and were interesting in their own right, the second season didn't have anyone like that who stuck around for a decent amount of time. The most interesting side characters were Rui and Tanya, and neither got a super amount of development, or had as entertaining a personality as the side characters from the first season I listed. Obviously this show has always been about its two leads, and no side character really holds a candle to these two in terms of their impact on the story or entertainment value or character development. But I do think a good supporting cast makes a difference to a show. And, for mine, Nodame Cantabile had a good supporting cast, but the second season, not so.

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Originally Posted by Theowne View Post
It's over. Again But at least there will be another season. I agree about the final episode being a bit underwhelming, but it didn't bother me too much. This is slice-of-life even more than Honey and Clover was, and we shouldn't expect any plot twists or the like. I still enjoyed the first season better, but when do we ever not enjoy the first seasons better?
There are a few examples. ARIA and Full Metal Panic immediately come to mind. Honey and Clover as well, some may argue. I think, in anime, if you use a sequel to really develop the characters you've established in the first season, you stand a good chance of making a sequel that has more impact than the first season. Although I'm starting to really grow sick of this trend where every popular anime franchise gets a sequel, just about. Why can't series just tell their complete story in a single two- or three-cour hit.
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Old 2008-12-29, 17:49   Link #343
Keiichi_chan
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Quote:
The most interesting side characters were Rui and Tanya, and neither got a super amount of development, or had as entertaining a personality as the side characters from the first season I listed.
I actually feel like characters like the flamboyant afro-dude were more or less "running gags" than actual characters. Mine was a good "normal joe" guy to balanace all the quirkiness of Nodame and extremeness of the others but not exceptionally interesting or unique because of it.

I have a feeling the characters in Pari-Hen were much more developed in the manga. Obviously a lot was cut to meet time constraints.
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Old 2008-12-29, 17:54   Link #344
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There is something seriously wrong in a world where Mine is a normal guy.
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Old 2008-12-30, 16:01   Link #345
KanaKaishou
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Originally Posted by Keiichi_chan View Post
I actually feel like characters like the flamboyant afro-dude were more or less "running gags" than actual characters. Mine was a good "normal joe" guy to balanace all the quirkiness of Nodame and extremeness of the others but not exceptionally interesting or unique because of it.

I have a feeling the characters in Pari-Hen were much more developed in the manga. Obviously a lot was cut to meet time constraints.
I think that you're by and large right. Mine was developed, but everyone else was just sort of...there, and very often funny.

Now, that doesn't excuse the character development in this series, but I found the "gang" this time to be more interesting--only Frank is a "running gag," and Yunlong doesn't even show up. Tanya, Kuroki, and Rui are interesting characters (who I wish they'd done more with. Rui's "I'm pissed and angry and don't like Chiaki and Co. anymore" act was never properly explained, and though I can infer her thought process, I had to think to much. My sister, who I watch this with, had several "huh?" moments, which I had to reason out what happened).
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Old 2008-12-31, 02:34   Link #346
Ascaloth
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NHRV final review has been uploaded:

[NHRV] Nodame Cantabile ~Paris Chapter~

Overall, it ended up as yet another example of the much-maligned J.C. Staff disappointing sequel. 6/10
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Old 2009-01-01, 21:39   Link #347
asako
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Does anyone know the name of the song the cellist plays at the beginning of the 11th episode? Thanks!

Meanwhile, I feel very dissatisfied with the ending to the second season! Season ones ending was so perfect, it would have been hard to live up to it anyways!
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Old 2009-01-02, 21:24   Link #348
Keiichi_chan
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There is something seriously wrong in a world where Mine is a normal guy.
LOL!!
Well, he was sort of the "bro" guy. The easy-going and friendly average young guy type.
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Old 2009-01-03, 17:27   Link #349
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Originally Posted by Sorrow-K View Post
the difference between Pari-hen and the first season is that while the first season had "supporting" characters like Mine, Masumi, Streseman and Harisen-sensei who had their roles in the story and were interesting in their own right, the second season didn't have anyone like that who stuck around for a decent amount of time.
I totally agree with this. The second season could have really benefitted from a full 23-24 episodes, like the first one. That would have given them time to properly develop some of the new supporting characters, and not had the first half of the season seem so rushed and disjointed.
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Old 2009-01-06, 12:09   Link #350
musume_no_hoshi
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For some reason I feel like blaming noitamina, it seems like alot of series during that time slot are 13 episodes, the only exceptions are Honey and Clover and Nodame Cantabile first season. J.C staff tends to be quite nice with episode count, other then Zero no Tsukai, most shows lately they make are 26 episodes. So it could be Fuji TV forcing Pari-hen to be 13 episodes, everyone with a normal understanding of anime pacing, would know that Pari-hen should have been 26 episodes, there are perfectly enough materials to animate. Or Fuji-TV wanted to see how well pari-hen does before deciding giving it more episode count. The next season could also make audience 'look forward' to the two live action movies (first one out at December 2009 and the second one at Spring 2010). (I also blame Fuji TV for not allowing 26 episodes of Toshokan Sensou too).

I think J.C staff did best their at making this 11 episodes, although I still think the live action paris-special in the 4 hour format did a better job (they did skip quite a large arc). J.C staff made alot of little changes, but nothing major...so that's still better then Zero no Tsukaima right?
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Old 2009-01-06, 12:50   Link #351
rg4619
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Quote:
For some reason I feel like blaming noitamina, it seems like alot of series during that time slot are 13 episodes
Yes, episode count was most likely a broadcaster decision. Notice that 11-episode sets (as opposed to 12 or 13) are quite uncommon, except with regard to noitaminA.

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so that's still better then Zero no Tsukaima right?
Well, we're kind of comparing apples and oranges. Zero no Tsukaima was intentionally adapted a certain way (and I suspect that the initial staff, who didn't work on ZnT2 or 3, never planned ahead for multiple seasons), so the issue was hardly episode count/running time.

OTOH, Nodame Paris is an abridged, but relatively faithful treatment of the original material. I think they did a decent job given the limitations.
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Old 2009-01-06, 16:41   Link #352
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Does anyone know the name of the song the cellist plays at the beginning of the 11th episode? Thanks!
I believe it was Bach's Suite for Solo Cello No. 1 in G Major
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Old 2009-01-07, 07:07   Link #353
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The whole season was underwhelming. It didn't have the same impact as the first season. The romance between them wasn't good either. It wasn't romantic. It was just plain, average, normal and mediocre. It's something that shouldn't happen and definitely unacceptable in music or any art form- mediocrity is crap.
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Old 2009-01-07, 12:19   Link #354
musume_no_hoshi
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Wow alot of people dislike pari-hen. I started pari-hen without watching the first season because I seen the live action drama already. Then I decided to watch the first anime series, I think both season are quite different, most likely because of the director change. Season 1's music scenes are really really really long, I personally wouldn't like sitting through 3 minutes of CG hands playing piano ^_^'' Pari-hen seems to 'get to the point', which in some way makes the first season lovers dislike it, but I think more casual watchers would find it easier to watch.

But I'm totally biased, Chiaki is more dere dere in pari-hen. Male tsunderes <3
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Old 2009-01-07, 12:37   Link #355
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musume_no_hoshi View Post
Wow alot of people dislike pari-hen. I started pari-hen without watching the first season because I seen the live action drama already. Then I decided to watch the first anime series, I think both season are quite different, most likely because of the director change. Season 1's music scenes are really really really long, I personally wouldn't like sitting through 3 minutes of CG hands playing piano ^_^'' Pari-hen seems to 'get to the point', which in some way makes the first season lovers dislike it, but I think more casual watchers would find it easier to watch.

But I'm totally biased, Chiaki is more dere dere in pari-hen. Male tsunderes <3
Meh i think its more people comparing it to season 1 which is why its was not as highly recieved. I for liked it but each to their own.

But you are right i think Chiaki has the be male dere dere-est one of them all.
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Old 2009-01-07, 12:41   Link #356
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But you are right i think Chiaki has the be male dere dere-est one of them all.
By far. No male character can compare to the Chiaki when it comes to the tsun tsun and the dere dere.
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Old 2009-01-07, 14:52   Link #357
musume_no_hoshi
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Chiaki is definately the defination of male tsundere. My last defination of male tsundere was Syaoran from CCS, Dojo-Kyokan from Toshokan Sensou is pretty much tsundere too. Chiaki wins them all. There's alot of male tsunderes in shoujo mangas, they also tend to be the one who ends up with the female lead (the prince-like type always loses).

I can't think on top of my head a male tsundere more tsundere then Chiaki. He has alot of tsun tsun moments, but also alot of dere dere moment, especially when he's engaged in Nodame's piano playing or moments in the the recent manga chapters.
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Old 2009-01-10, 23:15   Link #358
Keiichi_chan
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I watched the first season, then started reading the manga, then watched Pari-hen and enjoyed it. I think it left a bad taste in ppl's mouth because they had to edit so much out to fit the 13 episode limit and the lack of focus on music(didnt know that was such a big deal to fans). I watched it for the characters and romance, and it didnt disappoint me in that sense.
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Old 2009-01-14, 13:15   Link #359
TinyRedLeaf
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At last, I finally found the time to marathon this sequel.

Yes, it's fairly obvious that much of the original material had been drastically abridged to fit an 11-episode storyboard, even to a non-manga reader like me, who hasn't watched the live-action drama either. But then again, I've always felt that the first season wasted several episodes in the middle, meandering around pointlessly in between Stresseman's departure and the setting up of the Rising Star Orchestra. So, having more episodes doesn't necessarily guarantee a better story either.

By contrast, Paris-hen was focused on what it takes to be a successful professional musician — it takes talent, hard work and a joy for life. The various musicians featured this season each had to find a perfect balance between these three dimensions, before they could truly find their own voice.

Character development clearly took a major hit though. It was hard enough to relate to supporting characters in the first season — it was even harder this time round. But on the plus side, this allowed the romance between Chiaki and Nodame — arguably the biggest draw factor of this series beside its classical music — to take centrestage.

As for the other major casualty, the performance scenes, I'm not a big fan of classical music, so their absence is not a major loss to me. It's not that I dislike the genre per se, but rather that I disdain the elitist attitude of many classical-music fans. My outlook on any kind of fine art, from music to sculpture and paintings alike, is that it's meant to be enjoyed, and not to be worshipped upon a pedestal. You don't need special training to know whether something's good — if it makes you laugh; if it makes you cry; if it rips your heart out, that's great art.

That, to me, is the whole point of the Chiaki-Nodame dichotomy. Chiaki represents the relentless pursuit of an absolute ideal represented by the sacrosanct intentions of a composer, whereas Nodame — like Mozart apparently — played music simply for the sheer fun of it, etiquette be damned. The former is the perfect — but coldly methodical — follower of trends, while the latter is the creator of fresh new directions in music. Together, they make a complete couple. Paris-hen, in my opinion, explored this dynamic much better than the first season.

Overall, Paris-hen was ok. Not brilliant, but entertaining nonetheless. As for why this sequel was so short when it evidently could have used more episodes, I'd hazard a guess: It's the economy, stupid.

=======

On a more personal note, Paris-hen reminded me nostalgically of how I found my "own voice" in literary critique, particularly practical criticism of poetry.

In my first year of junior college, donkey years ago, my class as a whole struggled to understand what makes a poem great. Our teacher would point out the various mechanics of a poem, including rhyme, meter, alliteration, imagery and theme. We'd diligently apply these tools, but still ended up getting dismal marks for our efforts. It was utterly demoralising.

Not surprisingly, many of my classmates grew to hate the subject, believing — as most people would — that the great poets were people who spoke in a coded language that no one but they and their admirers could decipher. I can imagine my teacher's exasperation at the time: "What am I doing wrong? Why don't my students 'get' it?"

Looking back, we were not unlike poor Nodame stepping into the Paris Conservatory for the first time.

One sunny afternoon though, towards the end of my freshman year, I suddenly "found the light" while I was strolling in a public garden, listening to my thoughts. It was a moment of epiphany: a short, sharp spark of clarity. Eureka!

I realised that appreciating a poem is, in essence, no different from appreciating music — any kind of music. I had been so caught up with trying to interpret a poem, that I had quite simply forgotten to ask whether I enjoyed it. If I did, why? If not, why? Understanding comes only after the enjoyment.

From that moment of revelation, the world looked different. It was as though a fog had lifted, revealing perspectives I never knew existed — a universe of creative ideas, intertwined in harmony.

A good poem is built around a few core themes, relying on a tightly bound structure of words, rhyme, meter and imagery to evoke emotion. It's about delivering emotion through the written word. If it works, an effective poem ought to sound like music to the ear, even though a single note is never played.

A good poem doesn't have to deliver a message. Indeed, the message itself is unimportant. It's the emotions that it makes you feel that matter. You don't even have to share the poet's original intentions. Your own interpretation is valid so long as you can support it with evidence.

"Strangely, that's rather persuasive. Your musical analysis really takes creativity to a whole new level."
— Chiaki, on Nodame's interpretation of Pathetique, Episode 4

Quote:
Late night, Chiaki and Nodame are walking along the Seine

Chiaki: About 1,500 years ago, studies were carried out to understand the harmony of the world that God has created. It consisted of astronomy, geometry, number theory and music.

Nodame: Sounds like a talk about the universe...

She pauses. A thought has occured to her

Nodame: Are the rehearsals tough, Shinichi-kun? Do you hate the Marlet Orchestra now?

Chiaki is startled. Nodame had correctly guessed what was troubling him

Chiaki: Even though I understand the small things, for this orchestra, I have to find the harmony among them all.

He pauses

Chiaki: Lately, it looks like you've been doing nothing but practise. I think you're doing well.

Nodame: I'm doing my best so that I can play in your orchestra and your concerto.

Chiaki smiles

Chiaki: Is that really it? You work hard and practise every day, but it's not just to play a concerto with me, right?

Nodame smiles in return, and looks up to the starry sky

Nodame (thinking to herself): I'm sure the stars I'm looking at now are the same ones you're looking at.
Chiaki and Nodame discovered harmony in the universe — through each other's company.

That, in my opinion, is Paris-hen's core message. It resonates within me because of my life experiences, just as much as the events of the time influenced Romance and Impressionist artists, and correspondingly, their fellow musicians.

For this reason alone, I enjoyed this series, despite its many flaws. Art doesn't have to be perfect to be enjoyable.

Last edited by TinyRedLeaf; 2009-01-14 at 13:43.
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Old 2009-01-15, 23:01   Link #360
Keiichi_chan
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I reread some of the earlier volumes lying around my room and I actually do sorta miss Mine and Masumi and hope they make a comeback before the finale.
They werent the most human characters but damn if they werent entertaining ones!XDD
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