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Old 2009-03-11, 01:49   Link #2121
Rembr
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Can you provide an entire context in Japanese so that the meaning in your particular context can be deciphered. Literal translations given so far is accurate, more or less.
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Old 2009-03-11, 05:43   Link #2122
ganbaru
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It's the full paragraph, don't think we need the full chapter.
Spoiler for text in japanese, saving space, and spoiler for a light novel.:
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Old 2009-03-11, 06:38   Link #2123
RandomGuy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganbaru View Post
It's the full paragraph, don't think we need the full chapter.
Spoiler for text in japanese, saving space, and spoiler for a light novel.:
Guess I'll take a stab:
Spoiler for quick translation:
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Old 2009-03-11, 14:54   Link #2124
iLney
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そのスーパーへはよく来るんですか。」
「時々来ます

Is something wrong with those?

What does "へは" mean? Or it's just へ only?
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Old 2009-03-11, 15:38   Link #2125
MiserySyndrome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iLney View Post
そのスーパーへはよく来るんですか。」
「時々来ます

Is something wrong with those?

What does "へは" mean? Or it's just へ only?
"へは" literally translated means "To"
"へ" means to as well
But if I'm not mistaking it depends on the following sign with へは
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Old 2009-03-11, 16:43   Link #2126
soka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iLney View Post
そのスーパーへはよく来るんですか。」
「時々来ます

Is something wrong with those?

What does "へは" mean? Or it's just へ only?
は is the topic marker. When making a noun the topic of the sentence は replaces the particles が or を and is added after other particles like で に へ から まで.

私の学校では日本語が習えます
In my school you can learn Japanese.

私は学校で日本語が習えます
I can learn Japanese in the school.
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Old 2009-03-11, 20:43   Link #2127
Rembr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganbaru View Post
It's the full paragraph, don't think we need the full chapter.
Spoiler for text in japanese, saving space, and spoiler for a light novel.:
The previous suggestions still seem fine to me.

Maybe 'A back that doesn't turn around'

It'll depend on what you want to convey, a literal translation or a general feeling.
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Old 2009-03-11, 20:59   Link #2128
Ryuou
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Location: Dying to get back to Japan (but currently near Chicago)
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@ ganbaru - I think you have quite a bit of choices to choose from, so just choose the one that sounds the best to you. Or modify it a bit to fit how you like it. I don't know how many more ways we can come up with to translate it. The meaning's are all right, so yeah, just choose what you like.

Quote:
そのスーパーへはよく来るんですか。」
「時々来ます
This sounds odd to me. If you want to use 来る then using その is kind of weird. It should be この. If you want to use その then you should use 行く. And it might be better to switch the particle to in that case.
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Old 2009-03-12, 08:14   Link #2129
liquidroof
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I think Learning Japanes is like mixing the stone in the water.

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Old 2009-03-12, 10:32   Link #2130
RandomGuy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by liquidroof View Post
I think Learning Japanes is like mixing the stone in the water.
Maybe you should concentrate on English first, then.

Anyone care to interpret that metaphor(?)?
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Old 2009-03-12, 11:24   Link #2131
nikorai
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randomguy View Post
maybe you should concentrate on english first, then.

Anyone care to interpret that metaphor(?)?
日本語を勉強することは無駄なことをするということです。(=暖簾に腕押し・豆腐に鎹 など)
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Old 2009-03-12, 14:36   Link #2132
Rembr
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Quote:
This sounds odd to me. If you want to use 来る then using その is kind of weird. It should be この. If you want to use その then you should use 行く. And it might be better to switch the particle to in that case.
I did a double take on that too. Since the entire conversation is not shown, the quote may be referring to a third party, like:

"Does that person come to that supermarket often?"

"Sometimes s/he comes"
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Old 2009-03-12, 15:27   Link #2133
Ryuou
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Hmm...if we're talking third person then the only way I see it working would be if that person lives faraway, and the super market is close by somewhere. Then that person's coming from faraway to “come” into this area to go the supermarket would make sense I guess. But I would still change "he" for "ni".
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Old 2009-03-14, 16:49   Link #2134
Yukinokesshou
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Pet peeves

Just wondering if anyone shares my pet peeves about Japanese textbooks for English speakers? Nothing is more annoying than...

1. Textbooks which are in romaji for the first 200 pages. Honestly, it takes only an hour of your time to memorise hiragana and katakana. That's equivalent to one night's worth of Japanese homework.

2. Textbooks which don't contain a single kanji. Or textbooks designed for a year-long course which introduce no more than 30 kanji. Well, maybe I'm slightly biased since I had to memorise 30~50 kanji a week in primary school -.-

I guess the only things that might be worse are Korean textbooks that are completely in romaji (yes they do exist, sheer horror!). Hangul, in all their beautiful simplicity and elegance, can be memorised in 15 minutes...
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Old 2009-03-14, 17:32   Link #2135
Circular Logic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yukinokesshou View Post
Just wondering if anyone shares my pet peeves about Japanese textbooks for English speakers? Nothing is more annoying than...

1. Textbooks which are in romaji for the first 200 pages. Honestly, it takes only an hour of your time to memorise hiragana and katakana. That's equivalent to one night's worth of Japanese homework.

2. Textbooks which don't contain a single kanji. Or textbooks designed for a year-long course which introduce no more than 30 kanji. Well, maybe I'm slightly biased since I had to memorise 30~50 kanji a week in primary school -.-
Oh, those are HORRIBLE. Then again those are the ones you get for general audiences - 'Teach Yourself Japanese in 15 minutes' and all that. I often get the feeling that people who buy those are never really that serious in the first place...

Quote:
I guess the only things that might be worse are Korean textbooks that are completely in romaji (yes they do exist, sheer horror!). Hangul, in all their beautiful simplicity and elegance, can be memorised in 15 minutes...
Learning all the pronunciation rules on the other hand, takes far longer.
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Old 2009-03-14, 21:29   Link #2136
Ryuou
進む道は武士道のみ
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Dying to get back to Japan (but currently near Chicago)
Age: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yukinokesshou View Post
Just wondering if anyone shares my pet peeves about Japanese textbooks for English speakers? Nothing is more annoying than...

1. Textbooks which are in romaji for the first 200 pages. Honestly, it takes only an hour of your time to memorise hiragana and katakana. That's equivalent to one night's worth of Japanese homework.

2. Textbooks which don't contain a single kanji. Or textbooks designed for a year-long course which introduce no more than 30 kanji. Well, maybe I'm slightly biased since I had to memorise 30~50 kanji a week in primary school -.-
You are not alone.
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Old 2009-03-15, 16:40   Link #2137
iLney
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I recommend MangaJin. It's excellent. Or you can try the lighter Japanese in Mangaland.
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Old 2009-03-15, 17:37   Link #2138
Alchemist007
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I wish the post WW2 'get ride of kanji' thing was successful. I hate all this memorization. Kana ftmfw.
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Old 2009-03-15, 17:49   Link #2139
Circular Logic
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And get rid of the beauty of Chinese characters?! Philistine!
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Old 2009-03-15, 17:50   Link #2140
Yukinokesshou
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchemist007 View Post
I wish the post WW2 'get ride of kanji' thing was successful. I hate all this memorization. Kana ftmfw.
Okay, here's a story for you...

When my grandfather went to South Korea on business trips in the 1970s, communication was easy. Although he spoke Chinese and they spoke Korean, once everyone put pen to paper and expressed their thoughts in a few kanji (mostly nouns), a degree of mutual understanding was possible. My grandfather could also understand all street signs, maps, restaurant menus, etc.

A Japanese businessman who went to South Korea in the 1970s would have experienced the same ease of communication and understanding. Ditto for Chinese people in Japan and Japanese people in China today.

However, South Korea gradually got rid of kanji over the last 30 years. When my grandfather visited in the late 1990s, communication was no longer possible without an interpreter. For Japanese visitors, Seoul's government had to design special maps and translate signs... into katakana.

In some respects, kanji and Confucianism are the two thin threads which hold together the mutually hostile and vindictive nations of East Asia. Let's preserve them, by all means.

Addendum: Another consideration would be the insane number of homonyms in East Asian languages. South Korea is facing this very problem now; despite the loss of kanji in everyday life, Korean books and newspapers still need to insert kanji once in a while to clarify the meaning of certain words.
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