AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > General > General Chat

Notices

View Poll Results: Do you suffer from a Mental Disorder
Yes 16 26.67%
No 30 50.00%
Maybe 14 23.33%
Voters: 60. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2009-05-31, 02:22   Link #61
LeoXiao
提倡自我工業化
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Vereinigte Staaten
Age: 22
Seriously Vexx you sound more and more like my English teacher.

Quote:
Seriously, unless you were diagnosed by a neurologist, a neuro physician, or psychiatrist AND one that has studied the family of behaviors characterized as "ADD/ADHD"... there's a fair chance you were misdiagnosed.
This seems most likely true.
LeoXiao is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-31, 09:03   Link #62
Narona
Emotionless White Face
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitsu View Post
Whoa this test is fun...I'm a mental wreck xD
Paranoid, Anti-Social and Shizoid! Is taht even possible lol
i always new that I was anti social xDDD
Did you read what was written under your result ^^ ?

Anyway, I deleted my previous post, thinking it may not be a good idea to post that test

http://similarminds.com/personality_disorder.html but here's the link again for those who want to do it too
Narona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-31, 10:14   Link #63
Neat Hedgehog
Hack of all trades
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Michigan
Age: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
Seriously, unless you were diagnosed by a neurologist, a neuro physician, or psychiatrist AND one that has studied the family of behaviors characterized as "ADD/ADHD"... there's a fair chance you were misdiagnosed.
Yeah, I had to get bounced around between a couple doctors and an approved psychiatrist to get my insurance to pay for the prescription. And based off of my significantly improved academic performance after taking Strattera, I'd say it was a pretty accurate diagnosis.

Of course, if I was relying totally on a medication I'd be a chump. Obviously I've had to figure out my own workarounds for things, because there's nothing out there that will make my brain work perfectly, except my brain itself. A lot of people fail to realize things like that, which leads to being diagnosed with a bunch of other stuff when a single pill doesn't miraculously cure all their symptoms. Then they usually end up being even weirder from all the medications they're on.
Neat Hedgehog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-31, 18:03   Link #64
Mystique
Honyaku no Hime
*Fansubber
 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: In the eastern capital of the islands of the rising suns...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neat Hedgehog View Post
Yeah, I had to get bounced around between a couple doctors and an approved psychiatrist to get my insurance to pay for the prescription. And based off of my significantly improved academic performance after taking Strattera, I'd say it was a pretty accurate diagnosis.

Of course, if I was relying totally on a medication I'd be a chump. Obviously I've had to figure out my own workarounds for things, because there's nothing out there that will make my brain work perfectly, except my brain itself. A lot of people fail to realize things like that, which leads to being diagnosed with a bunch of other stuff when a single pill doesn't miraculously cure all their symptoms. Then they usually end up being even weirder from all the medications they're on.
Thus lies another problem.
When the ratio of genuine cases such as yours pales in comparison to the ratio of misdiagnosed cases and it seems everyone's popping a pill for some 'emotional or mental' dysfunction, then how can we sincerely believe someone when they claim that they're suffering?
I'm curious to know if you've recieved your fair share of rebuke and scoffing before you were able to be diagnosed (or even post diagnosis, do you still receive your fair share of skeptism?)
__________________

Worrying is like a rocking chair. It gives you something to do, but it doesn't get you anywhere. - Van Wilder
"If you ain't laughin', you ain't livin'." - Carlos Mencia
Mystique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-05-31, 19:19   Link #65
Neat Hedgehog
Hack of all trades
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Michigan
Age: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique View Post
I'm curious to know if you've recieved your fair share of rebuke and scoffing before you were able to be diagnosed (or even post diagnosis, do you still receive your fair share of skeptism?)
Definitely. Although the symptoms weren't as severe when I was younger, I was probably having trouble with it from about 10yrs onward.

I was homeschooled since I was 6, since I got along really badly with the other kids, and hated being around them. Until I was about 16 my mother would typically tell me everyday that I was stupid, failing at my school work, and other such things, because I couldn't get my work done on time. I tried to work my ass off for years, but I just couldn't seem to make it go. I'd get the answers right no matter what the subject was, but it would take hours for me to do it.

I looked around on the internet when I was somewhere between 13 - 15, and thought I seemed like I had ADHD. I brought up the subject with my mother, and invariably she just said I was being stupid and trying to come up with excuses for why I was being lazy. She was really way more interested in my brother who was totally average and normal, and shared her interest in literature. Of course, since one potential symptom of ADHD is poor reading skills (sometimes I have to reread a sentence like 10 times before I remember it all), I really did not enjoy English as a subject of study. The more I read about it, the more it seemed like I might be ADHD. Nobody was really willing to do anything about it, though, and just insisted that I was just screwing around.

Fast forward about 5 years, after my brother finally showed himself to be a major tool, stole $1,500 and left the state. With him out of the way, she finally paid enough attention to me to realize that I wasn't just jerking everybody around, and that I seriously was not able to get things done in a normal fashion. By that time, it had gotten to the point where I had the attention span of a goldfish. I could talk on the phone, and a minute later you could ask me "who was that?" and I'd ask "I was talking to someone on the phone?" After a few months of deliberation, I went to the doctor and asked him about it. I was gonna start my first semester of college soon, and I didn't want to bomb it because I spent more time counting ceiling tiles than I did listening to the teachers.

It was kinda nice to actually have somebody listen to the idea of it, for a change. At the same time, I didn't really want to start taking a medication either, since I'm generally a "do-it-yourself" kinda guy. I mean, I've had my shoulder, thumb, and hip dislocated before, and reset them all myself, so the last thing I wanted to do was start taking pills. Eventually, I figured that I could either take some pills to help with what I couldn't manage on my own, or wear myself to a complete frazzle in college trying to manage 16 credit hours with all the concentration powers of a rabid ferret on crack. My 3.82 GPA thanks me for taking the former.

I still get people who think it's all just me being a lazy twerp, though. Typically it's the older people in my classes. I can't really blame them for thinking that, though, given how many ADHD cases are completely superficial.

Whoa, long post... I'm wordy sometimes. People have told me that I have a tendency to over-explain things.
Neat Hedgehog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-01, 23:40   Link #66
NTThao
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Hmm!!
I think I only crazy
What is Mental Illness: Mental Illness Facts

Mental illnesses are medical conditions that disrupt a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others, and daily functioning. Just as diabetes is a disorder of the pancreas, mental illnesses are medical conditions that often result in a diminished capacity for coping with the ordinary demands of life.

Serious mental illnesses include major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and borderline personality disorder. The good news about mental illness is that recovery is possible.

Mental illnesses can affect persons of any age, race, religion, or income. Mental illnesses are not the result of personal weakness, lack of character, or poor upbringing. Mental illnesses are treatable. Most people diagnosed with a serious mental illness can experience relief from their symptoms by actively participating in an individual treatment plan.

In addition to medication treatment, psychosocial treatment such as cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, peer support groups, and other community services can also be components of a treatment plan and that assist with recovery. The availability of transportation, diet, exercise, sleep, friends, and meaningful paid or volunteer activities contribute to overall health and wellness, including mental illness recovery.

Here are some important facts about mental illness and recovery:

* Mental illnesses are biologically based brain disorders. They cannot be overcome through "will power" and are not related to a person's "character" or intelligence.
* Mental disorders fall along a continuum of severity. Even though mental disorders are widespread in the population, the main burden of illness is concentrated in a much smaller proportion — about 6 percent, or 1 in 17 Americans — who suffer from a serious mental illness. It is estimated that mental illness affects 1 in 5 families in America.
* The World Health Organization has reported that four of the 10 leading causes of disability in the US and other developed countries are mental disorders. By 2020, Major Depressive illness will be the leading cause of disability in the world for women and children.
* Mental illnesses usually strike individuals in the prime of their lives, often during adolescence and young adulthood. All ages are susceptible, but the young and the old are especially vulnerable.
* Without treatment the consequences of mental illness for the individual and society are staggering: unnecessary disability, unemployment, substance abuse, homelessness, inappropriate incarceration, suicide and wasted lives; The economic cost of untreated mental illness is more than 100 billion dollars each year in the United States.
* The best treatments for serious mental illnesses today are highly effective; between 70 and 90 percent of individuals have significant reduction of symptoms and improved quality of life with a combination of pharmacological and psychosocial treatments and supports.
* With appropriate effective medication and a wide range of services tailored to their needs, most people who live with serious mental illnesses can significantly reduce the impact of their illness and find a satisfying measure of achievement and independence. A key concept is to develop expertise in developing strategies to manage the illness process.
* Early identification and treatment is of vital importance; By ensuring access to the treatment and recovery supports that are proven effective, recovery is accelerated and the further harm related to the course of illness is minimized.
* Stigma erodes confidence that mental disorders are real, treatable health conditions. We have allowed stigma and a now unwarranted sense of hopelessness to erect attitudinal, structural and financial barriers to effective treatment and recovery. It is time to take these barriers down.
__________________
NTThao is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-02, 00:48   Link #67
Bane Rieko
Dreamer
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Otaku-land
Age: 24
Send a message via MSN to Bane Rieko
It's pretty well known around my family I might be bipolar and have Schizotypal and Schizoid Personality Disorders, as they run in our family and I show quite a few of the signs of having them.

Quote:
Schizoid Personality Disorder - individual generally detached from social relationships, and shows a narrow range of emotional expression in various social settings.

Schizotypal Personality Disorder - individual is uncomfortable in close relationships, has thought or perceptual distortions, and peculiarities of behavior.
These describe me just a LITTLE too well.
Bane Rieko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-02, 16:39   Link #68
Mystique
Honyaku no Hime
*Fansubber
 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: In the eastern capital of the islands of the rising suns...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neat Hedgehog View Post
I still get people who think it's all just me being a lazy twerp, though. Typically it's the older people in my classes. I can't really blame them for thinking that, though, given how many ADHD cases are completely superficial.

Whoa, long post... I'm wordy sometimes. People have told me that I have a tendency to over-explain things.
Meant to say this earlier, but thanks for explaining ^^
*is a bookworm, likes long stories*
__________________

Worrying is like a rocking chair. It gives you something to do, but it doesn't get you anywhere. - Van Wilder
"If you ain't laughin', you ain't livin'." - Carlos Mencia
Mystique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-02, 20:00   Link #69
Slice of Life
eyewitness
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by NTThao View Post
Even though mental disorders are widespread in the population, the main burden of illness is concentrated in a much smaller proportion about 6 percent, or 1 in 17 Americans who suffer from a serious mental illness. It is estimated that mental illness affects 1 in 5 families in America.
Do age-related illnesses and/or those with a clear physical cause, like Alzheimer enter into these numbers?

I wish I knew how this compares to physical illnesses. I have the feeling that the numbers are much lower (but I can be totally wrong here). Which, in turn, makes me very much doubt the truth behind the numbers for mental illnesses.
__________________
- Any ideas how to fill this space?
Slice of Life is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-02, 20:06   Link #70
yezhanquan
Observer/Bookman wannabe
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 29
@Slice: I thought most mental illnesses have chemical/physical/hormonal causes. It's just that we're not sure what the exact triggers are.
__________________
Those from the lower levels cannot hope to surpass those from the upper.

RIP, Oba-chan (1935-2008)
yezhanquan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-02, 21:28   Link #71
SaintessHeart
Ehh? EEEEHHHHHH?
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by yezhanquan View Post
@Slice: I thought most mental illnesses have chemical/physical/hormonal causes. It's just that we're not sure what the exact triggers are.
Most of the triggers for mental illnesses are the same. And it is personal experience.

For example, a person who gets to stay in a same platform with a live hand grenade tend to be more scared of being with small round things (I heard this from my dad, his friend's son dropped a hand grenade at a live throw during basic military training and is currently terrified of billard balls). Similar to a case in which to a person who hardly goes out becomes sociophobic, and a person who is always accompanied becomes claustrophobic over time.

The more serious cases like general madness can be caused by mercury poisoning or eating cow fed with sheep innards. Otherwise, how you treat a person, or how others treat him, will ultimately result in the way he thinks, which will then be defined by the rest of society.

Thus it is important that we accept others for who they are rather than judging them as crazy. The rest of the monkeys tend to see and follow suit, resulting in a arithmetically progressive effect that will brand these people (not the monkeys) as mentally ill in the end. Everyone is weird in their own way and their own form of obsession, and I don't think anyone is actually "normal" at all.

There is no straightforward logic to human behavior.
__________________

When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
SaintessHeart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-02, 21:36   Link #72
Slice of Life
eyewitness
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by yezhanquan View Post
@Slice: I thought most mental illnesses have chemical/physical/hormonal causes. It's just that we're not sure what the exact triggers are.
In the case of Alzheimer, the defect is a demonstrable degeneration of the hardware (the brain). Failure of hardware causes mental symptoms. In the case of ADHD, say, this is AFAIK mere speculation. It could as well be a pure "software" defect.

In any case, my main point was the clear correlation with age. Do all kinds of dementia count as mental illness? If so, where to draw the line? I was brighter at age twenty than now, so you could argue that I suffer under am age-related mental disorder too. If you count all that I have no doubt that "mental disorders are widespread". It's just a more dramatic way to say "people are getting old".

Now NTThao's list of serious mental illnesses doesn't really look as if age related problems play a major role. Which brings me back to my initial question: if we believe these numbers then why are people, apparently physically so much more healthy than mentally?
__________________
- Any ideas how to fill this space?
Slice of Life is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-02, 21:43   Link #73
Mauru
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
Most of the triggers for mental illnesses are the same. And it is personal experience.

For example, a person who gets to stay in a same platform with a live hand grenade tend to be more scared of being with small round things (I heard this from my dad, his friend's son dropped a hand grenade at a live throw during basic military training and is currently terrified of billard balls). Similar to a case in which to a person who hardly goes out becomes sociophobic, and a person who is always accompanied becomes claustrophobic over time.

The more serious cases like general madness can be caused by mercury poisoning or eating cow fed with sheep innards. Otherwise, how you treat a person, or how others treat him, will ultimately result in the way he thinks, which will then be defined by the rest of society.

Thus it is important that we accept others for who they are rather than judging them as crazy. The rest of the monkeys tend to see and follow suit, resulting in a arithmetically progressive effect the will brand them as mentally ill in the end. Everyone is weird in their own way and their own form of obsession, and I don't think anyone is actually "normal" at all.

There is no straightforward logic to human behavior.
Actually the causes of mental illness are very complex, they actually many factors contributing to a person developing a mental disorder. Psychologists, Psychiatrists etc... Have their favorite theories to explain things. As for example Major Depression: The Psychobiological theory explains that Major Depression is caused by a chemical imbalance, The Cognitive Theory explains is caused by irrational ideas, The Psychodynamic Theory could attribute depression to unconscious conflicts originated from childhood. The Behavioral theory could say Depression was caused by continuous reinforcing of "depressed" behavior.

Actually no scientist in the world can 100% said what causes a mental disorder. Psychiatry is a pretty new science.

Most practitioners today adopt an elastic approach, they combine all the theories to look at the whole picture, in this day tough there is too much attention on the biological aspects of mental illness, sometimes people are beginning to think that a medication is going to solve all their problems, Mind you, that doesn't mean medication isn't necessary, sometimes medication is a must before psychotherapy.

In the field of science by the way there is no "madness", what you may be referring as general madness may be schizophrenia which can happen to anyone. No matter whom you are but especially if you have a family history of this illness, where born in winter time etc...

Still saddens me how much ignorance there is on this topic...

and yes Dementia is classified as a Mental Disorder by The Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.
Mauru is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-02, 21:48   Link #74
SaintessHeart
Ehh? EEEEHHHHHH?
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slice of Life View Post
In the case of Alzheimer, the defect is a demonstrable degeneration of the hardware (the brain). Failure of hardware causes mental symptoms. In the case of ADHD, say, this is AFAIK mere speculation. It could as well be a pure "software" defect.

In any case, my main point was the clear correlation with age. Do all kinds of dementia count as mental illness? If so, where to draw the line? I was brighter at age twenty than now, so you could argue that I suffer under am age-related mental disorder too. If you count all that I have no doubt that "mental disorders are widespread". It's just a more dramatic way to say "people are getting old".

Now NTThao's list of serious mental illnesses doesn't really look as if age related problems play a major role. Which brings me back to my initial question: if we believe these numbers then why are people, apparently physically so much more healthy than mentally?
ADHD, IMO, is more like the brain is able to process information much faster than it can remember them. It is like a Core 2 running on 512MB RAM, thus the attention disorder as it cannot remember the information it has processed.

Here is a fact : At the age of 23, you lose about 22 billion brain cells. Treat it as a value from a logarithmic half-life graph and you will understand why.

Regarding your last paragraph on your initial question, I would like to say it is general pragmatism in the wrong direction. People just want to be convinced, and it seems that those numbers placate them. However they don't realise that even those numbers can be manipulated.
__________________

When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
SaintessHeart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-02, 22:25   Link #75
Slice of Life
eyewitness
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
numbers can be manipulated.
Indeed. There a strong signs that above "Mental Illness Facts" are a piece of propaganda anyway. I won't even start pulling it apart. Still I wish I had some numbers for comparison.

I do not deny the fact that mental illnesses exist. I do also not deny the fact that some can't be overcome by "willpower". Finally, I do not deny the fact that some might be curable with medicaments. I strongly doubt however that every diagnosis is correct, I doubt that every illness described actually exists and every medicament or other therapy prescribed actually works. I very much doubt that 6 percent of Americans suffer - not under some trivialities but: under a serious mental illness that might lead to "unnecessary disability, unemployment, substance abuse, homelessness, inappropriate incarceration, suicide and wasted lives" if they don't throw in the right kind of happy pills.
__________________
- Any ideas how to fill this space?
Slice of Life is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:09.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
We use Silk.