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Old 2009-08-11, 05:55   Link #3061
Clarste
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Names are overrated. I really can't think of any situation where you need to say someone's name while talking to them. "Hey!" and "Excuse me" cover geting people's attention. Honestly, I don't think I've said anyone's name to them for the past 10 years.

Talking about them is a different situation, but in that case you can always ask the person you're talking to.
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Old 2009-08-11, 06:02   Link #3062
genryou
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Silly Question:

djmax.co.kr

Does this website can be made using Netbeans or any other java software?
What is the best place to search for a tutorials in order create a site on par with this one?
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Old 2009-08-11, 06:26   Link #3063
LiberLibri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragon4dudes View Post
I'm pretty sure its fan-based. Someone'll need to check for me... The first thing that comes into mind with the word "leek" is that "Leekspin" animation of Orihime from Bleach.
True. It came originally from a movie featured with Loituma and Orihime, then the song was re-sung by Hatsune Miku (requires a NicoNico account), who had no relation to leek but bore one to express the respect for the original.

Quote:
Originally Posted by genryou View Post
Silly Question:

djmax.co.kr

Does this website can be made using Netbeans or any other java software?
What is the best place to search for a tutorials in order create a site on par with this one?
If you mean the presentation, not the server system, then you just need a flash editor.

My question is: what are the foods symbolising the seasons in the US? Every German associates Spagel (asparagus) with spring, Somen is indispansable for summer in Japan. I want to know such ones in the US case.
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Old 2009-08-11, 06:35   Link #3064
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Quote:
If you mean the presentation, not the server system, then you just need a flash editor.
More like I wanted to know if it can be made using JAVA soft. Plus, I,m clueless at how some of the effects/motion are made.

Its not like I dont want to use Flash, but my course project have to be based on OOP and JAVA.
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Old 2009-08-11, 06:53   Link #3065
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genryou View Post
Silly Question:

djmax.co.kr

Does this website can be made using Netbeans or any other java software?
What is the best place to search for a tutorials in order create a site on par with this one?
It's a flash website. And Java (J2EE) is used more for the "background service" such as database access, and request processing, rather than the presentation.

You can of course use Java as your server side (back-end). For the animation front-end, I suggest that you use AJAX intead, it is much lighter and doesn't need any plugin, and it's open source. For easy Java RIA (Rich Internet Application) with AJAX, then you might want to look at the ICEFaces or RichFaces web appliaction framework. It has a nice look and feel for Java-based web application. The downside of those framework is, you'll need some level understanding of JSF, and probably not suitable for beginners.

If you're a beginner, I highly recommend that you first learn basic JSP with EJB 3.0. Then you can move forward and choose your framework of choice, or stick with JSP & EJB. However, I really think that you should learn at least one of the MVC (Model-View-Controller) web application framework if you really serious with Java web application development. I'm personally liked the Apache Wicket framework.

For your IDE of choice, you can select several good Java IDE such as NetBeans, Eclipse, IdeaJ, etc... I'm a NetBeans guy though....

Well, in other words, the answer of your question is yes. You can create any kind of website with Java.

However, at some point usually you'll need to choose your path. Are you want to be a web designer (experts in creating great looking website) or a web developer (the guy who made your form works). Of course, you could do both if you have the ability to do so.

Me? I'm a developer, because my web design skill is sucks and my hands already full with the back-end code...

EDIT : Oh, and of course you can also create a flash-like animation applet and embed it in your website. Or maybe a full applet website (which is scary...)
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Old 2009-08-11, 08:03   Link #3066
genryou
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Quote:
ICEFaces or RichFaces
Quote:
I'm personally liked the Apache Wicket framework.
This is really useful. I never heard of any of this framework before.

Thanks for your suggestion, it never occured to me to use AJAX before.

Quote:
However, at some point usually you'll need to choose your path. Are you want to be a web designer (experts in creating great looking website) or a web developer (the guy who made your form works). Of course, you could do both if you have the ability to do so.
I,m more of a web designer guy, but since this project is an individual project, I have to do both, despite my lack of knowledge of web developing.

Anyway, thanks for sharing your knowledge, I still have much to learn regarding the frameworks.
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Old 2009-08-12, 21:58   Link #3067
fish eric
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LiberLibri View Post
My question is: what are the foods symbolising the seasons in the US? Every German associates Spagel (asparagus) with spring, Somen is indispansable for summer in Japan. I want to know such ones in the US case.

In the USA it will be different person to person and region to region, but from my view point.

Summer - BBQ (doesn't matter what meat, just the fact that you are BBQing)

I can't really think of anything else because we tend to eat all foods all year round.
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Old 2009-08-12, 22:16   Link #3068
ZippyDSM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fish eric View Post
In the USA it will be different person to person and region to region, but from my view point.

Summer - BBQ (doesn't matter what meat, just the fact that you are BBQing)

I can't really think of anything else because we tend to eat all foods all year round.
Christmas baked ham or turkey
Thanks giving turkey and dressing
If you have a local vegetable market you might get yellow squash mid summer and orka throughout the summer.

Supermarkets have seasonal food all year, so turkey is the only thing I can really think of...
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Old 2009-08-12, 23:56   Link #3069
Vexx
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Because we "globalized" our food distribution, many US people can no longer tell you what foods/produce are grown in what season.

They've got pumpkins associated with fall and turkey+dressing for the Big Shopping Holiday Period (Thanksgiving thru New Years). Easter dinner usually involves a large ham for Christians. Summer is watermelon and BBQ.

After that it depends on the region and the family's historical culture. Our house believes any holiday/season involving festivals and food is worth celebrating so we not only do our historical heritages of Japanese and European stuff but pull in Mexican foods-traditions (being originally from Texas), and a few other random bits of fun.

Thanksgiving involves turkey+dressing and heaps of sushi. New Years includes black-eyed peas and Ozoni.
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Old 2009-08-13, 00:08   Link #3070
calorie
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There was something I wanted to ask for a while but I kept forgetting to do so. Why do characters in anime sometimes use english words in the midst of their conversations in japanese? And the weird thing is, it's for the most ordinary words for which there must be japanese terms, not for some cool english slang that is best left untranslated.

So is it a common thing in japanese language to adopt words that way? Does western culture really have much of an impact on it?
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Old 2009-08-13, 02:54   Link #3071
oompa loompa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsla View Post
There was something I wanted to ask for a while but I kept forgetting to do so. Why do characters in anime sometimes use english words in the midst of their conversations in japanese? And the weird thing is, it's for the most ordinary words for which there must be japanese terms, not for some cool english slang that is best left untranslated.

So is it a common thing in japanese language to adopt words that way? Does western culture really have much of an impact on it?
There 'must' be? I see what your point is, but you should give more specific examples, because, there are plenty of 'borrowed words' from English, and other languages. However, there are times when the word does have a Japanese equivalent, and is still said in English - I can't really comment on that - it could be because of a lot of things, from common usage to reducing ambiguity.

Edit:
Don't worry, there are plenty of loaned words from Japanese into English as well. I'm no expert on Japan, so I can't really tell you how much loan words are indicative of western influence - but it could very well be a matter of practicality
.
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Old 2009-08-13, 03:11   Link #3072
calorie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oompa loompa View Post
There 'must' be? I see what your point is, but you should give more specific examples, because, there are plenty of 'borrowed words' from English, and other languages. However, there are times when the word does have a Japanese equivalent, and is still said in English - I can't really comment on that - it could be because of a lot of things, from common usage to reducing ambiguity.

Edit:
Don't worry, there are plenty of loaned words from Japanese into English as well. I'm no expert on Japan, so I can't really tell you how much loan words are indicative of western influence - but it could very well be a matter of practicality
.
Sorry, I can't remember any examples right now, but it could be that I was mistaking Gairaigo, these 'borrowed' words for truly english words. Must be that while I watch animes I tend to notice a familiar, though more or less modified, word in the sea of japanese and I attribute that modification to accent or incorrect pronunciation on character's part. Though there are probably also literal english words in use for reasons you've mentioned.
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Old 2009-08-13, 04:46   Link #3073
Vexx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsla View Post
Sorry, I can't remember any examples right now, but it could be that I was mistaking Gairaigo, these 'borrowed' words for truly english words. Must be that while I watch animes I tend to notice a familiar, though more or less modified, word in the sea of japanese and I attribute that modification to accent or incorrect pronunciation on character's part. Though there are probably also literal english words in use for reasons you've mentioned.
Japanese actually is similar to English in that it freely grabs and incorporates words - even if there already exists a word. Its simply good variety and diversity. If you study the language, you'll learn that a fair number of words are actually Portuguese in origin as well as a few other languages. English terms got a wedge in during the occupation period after WW2 and the Japanese still think American culture is "cool" and love to sprinkle phrases in (whether they actually fit well or not). Its most common for imported items to arrive with their foreign names.

English is a hodge-podge of borrowed, stolen, and blenderized words reflecting Latin and Anglo-Saxon roots buried under a dozen other fly-by language lootings. Almost any native english speaker knows what you mean by "tsunami", "arigato". "konnichiwa", etc. Try counting the number of French words in the English language. English has dozens of ways to say the same thing... at least Japanese remains a bit simpler in that regard (maybe a dozen ).
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Old 2009-08-13, 21:24   Link #3074
Kylaran
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
English is a hodge-podge of borrowed, stolen, and blenderized words reflecting Latin and Anglo-Saxon roots buried under a dozen other fly-by language lootings. Almost any native english speaker knows what you mean by "tsunami", "arigato". "konnichiwa", etc. Try counting the number of French words in the English language. English has dozens of ways to say the same thing... at least Japanese remains a bit simpler in that regard (maybe a dozen ).
But French influence lasted roughly 200 years after William's invasion in 1066, after which English became dominant over French in Parliament and amongst royalty. I would name dynasties and stuff, but I forgot most of my English history since it's been a year since I last studied it.

You can't really compare the same amount of Latin influence with English to English's affect on Japanese; I think Sino-Japanese vocabulary is the equivalent of words with Latin roots in English.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bsla View Post
Sorry, I can't remember any examples right now, but it could be that I was mistaking Gairaigo, these 'borrowed' words for truly english words. Must be that while I watch animes I tend to notice a familiar, though more or less modified, word in the sea of japanese and I attribute that modification to accent or incorrect pronunciation on character's part. Though there are probably also literal english words in use for reasons you've mentioned.
There is a difference between gairaigo (words originating outside of Japan) and gaikokugo (words literally used by other languages). For example, if a character in anime speaks English with a bad accent, it still tries to be "English." But if a character tosses around a few words you're familiar with from English, it's most likely gairaigo.

Gairaigo, words taken from other languages as Vexx explained, generally have *somewhat* different meanings in Japanese compared to the original meaning. However, phonetic differences among languages are very hard to ignore by the time you're an in your late teens or are an adult, meaning that, without practice, your pool of distinguishable phonemes will remain within the scope of your language. It may *sound* like bad English, but many of those words have their own meaning among Japanese and simply carry the remnants of the original language it came from. So they're not literally 1 for 1 in Japanese and English. What you're hearing is Japanese.

Here's a better way to distinguish whether or not the word is gairaigo or gaikokugo. Japanese has several "classes" of words. These are: nouns, verbal nouns, noun adjectives, adjectives, and verbs. The interesting thing is that the majority of loaned words in Japanese are placed in the noun, verbal noun, or adjective noun categories; the rest are closed categories. For example, the Sino-Japanese word 運動する (undou suru) is a verbal noun. The roots come from Chinese (yun dong), which is a noun, then has a verb attached to it (suru). Thus, it becomes "Japanese."

If you notice that the words you're hearing are not among these categories, then it's likely to be "English." For example, articles don't exist in Japanese, so if you hear "the ____" (often Japan-ified as ザ・___), it's most likely meant to be English, even with a sea of Japanese around it. In comparison, the word "through" (スルーする) is often used to mean "to ignore," which is not its function in English.

Just the other day, my Korean roommate was watching a video about dancing, and, although I don't know any Korean, could guess several words because they sounded like Japanese/Chinese (i.e. undou/yun dong, aka movement/exercise). It was fun. XD
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Old 2009-08-14, 12:06   Link #3075
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how do you call this in English?

Spoiler for image:


in our country we call it a brancard, but is that what you call it in English also?
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Old 2009-08-14, 12:15   Link #3076
Pellissier
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Originally Posted by -KarumA- View Post
in our country we call it a brancard, but is that what you call it in English also?
In english it's called Stretcher
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Old 2009-08-14, 14:44   Link #3077
-KarumA-
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Originally Posted by Pellissier View Post
In english it's called Stretcher
I thought a stretcher was like one of those things without wheels
guess I was wrong after all lol
thank you very much
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Old 2009-08-15, 04:05   Link #3078
fish eric
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Originally Posted by -KarumA- View Post
I thought a stretcher was like one of those things without wheels
guess I was wrong after all lol
thank you very much
Actually you are technically right. However the two words are used interchangeably by all except those in the medical profession.

Definitions of stretcher on the Web:


* a wooden framework on which canvas is stretched and fixed for oil painting
* a litter for transporting people who are ill or wounded or dead; usually consists of a sheet of canvas stretched between two poles

Definitions of gurney on the Web:


* a metal stretcher with wheels
wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn
* A gurney is the U.S. term for a type of stretcher used in modern hospitals
and ambulances in ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gurney
* A stretcher having wheeled legs
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/gurney


____________________________________________


Now for my question.

In anime and manga whenever someone is being interrogated, especially by the police, there is a bowl of I think some kind of pork udon. And someone is always like "Noooo! don't eat the food". It seems like if you eat it you are gonna confess.

My actual questions are:

1) what is the name of the dish served

2) why is it served during interrogations and what does eating it do?




Here is an F.Y.I for everyone. In the USA, and surely in other countries as well, the police will give you sodas and water during an interrogation. The reason they do this is because they want you to have to pee. It makes you nervous and uncomfortable. Therefore making it harder to lie when they ask the same question over and over because you will lose you concentration.
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Old 2009-08-15, 06:10   Link #3079
-KarumA-
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Int he transformers movie they have donuts on the table
it is about being guilty and being innocent
I think it was when you eat the donuts that you are innocent if you don't eat it then you suggest that you might be guilty

Quote:
from transformers wiki]

His biggest piece of advice: Eat all the donuts. If you don't touch them, they think you're guilty
reason prob is if you are guilty and dead up serious you wouldn't eat them because you might be nervous or on edge
eating prob suggests you're more relaxed and at ease which can suggest that you have no bloody idea why you are in there

also soup since it is warm can make you want to go to the bathroom sooner or perhaps straight away, this is probably why they say "Don't eat it"
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Old 2009-08-15, 06:21   Link #3080
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1.) Katsudon

2.) It's a sign of "friendship" and "compassion" toward the suspect to show them the police are on their side.

This is largely fictional, though. Police don't actually do this. :P
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