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Old 2009-11-18, 05:28   Link #4681
Tiberium Wolf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoko Takeo View Post
Two days ago, one of my workmates came in late because someone got run over by a train one stop before his. It's really getting popular and it's scary imho. That begs the question then. If someone falls over to the rails, would you try to save that person if there was still time before the train?
I think I would be like those ppl in Gantz. I would wanna see body parts flying.
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Old 2009-11-18, 05:32   Link #4682
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Old 2009-11-18, 09:43   Link #4683
LynnieS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoko Takeo View Post
Two days ago, one of my workmates came in late because someone got run over by a train one stop before his. It's really getting popular and it's scary imho. That begs the question then. If someone falls over to the rails, would you try to save that person if there was still time before the train?
I believe that there were a few of these around Tokyo over the past few months as well, unfortunately. For your question (and around the Tokyo area only), it depends on the train line(s) for me. The problem is that it's not easy to gauge the speed on an oncoming vehicle - not to mention how hard it may be to boost someone over the edge of the platform and have the time yourself to either get back or hide under the platform. Assuming that you can actually hide, that is.

For the religious and/or do-gooder, though, if you go ahead but fail, would it be considered a good deed or a suicide attempt?

Record 49.1 million Americans faced hunger in 2008
Quote:
Nov. 16 (Bloomberg) -- About one in six Americans lived in households that struggled to afford food at some point last year as tight credit and the fastest rate of food inflation since 1980 combined to strain budgets, the government said.

About 49.1 million people were “food insecure” in 2008, up 36 percent from a year earlier, the Department of Agriculture said today in a report. That’s the most since the USDA conducted its first survey on food insecurity in 1995 and 29 percent higher than the previous record in 2004.
The numbers for 2009, odds are, will be worse. Depending on whom you ask, 2010 looks bad also.
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Old 2009-11-18, 11:31   Link #4684
Tsuyoshi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnieS View Post
I believe that there were a few of these around Tokyo over the past few months as well, unfortunately. For your question (and around the Tokyo area only), it depends on the train line(s) for me. The problem is that it's not easy to gauge the speed on an oncoming vehicle - not to mention how hard it may be to boost someone over the edge of the platform and have the time yourself to either get back or hide under the platform. Assuming that you can actually hide, that is.

For the religious and/or do-gooder, though, if you go ahead but fail, would it be considered a good deed or a suicide attempt?
Well, London train lines are pretty reliable no matter where you go. I guess it's not the same in other parts of the world. You usually hear someone on the speaker saying that a train isn't going to stop at the station when it's passing by your platform, in which case the person who jumped is fucked. If there wasn't a train coming anytime soon, I'd definitely try saving him, hard as it may be. Best thing is to call the warden of the station firsthand before trying to act like a hero yourself.

As for your question, I consider that as sacrificing yourself for someone else. That being said, I'd think of it as a good deed. The media would most definitely try twisting the story and making it look like a suicide attempt from two people but one ended up failing. Stories like that are more interesting and win more columns on the newspaper than a small heroic act. That's the sad and disgusting truth about the media and people's interests.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnieS View Post
Record 49.1 million Americans faced hunger in 2008
The numbers for 2009, odds are, will be worse. Depending on whom you ask, 2010 looks bad also.
There's a reason I don't particularly like the idea of going to America, and what's funny is how I actually work for Bloomberg at the moment so I came across that article earlier. The problem with America is that their economic system encourages individual progression instead of what would be more beneficial to society as a whole. Their healthcare policies are a good example of that. You're as good as dead without health insurance. The situation here is no different. I wouldn't be surprised if someone comes up with food insurance in the US eventually.
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Old 2009-11-18, 11:37   Link #4685
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cipher View Post
Spoiler for we've seen it enough times:
Yes, its nice to see courtesy and etiquette trying to return to the White House (even if he's so "hagajin"-awkward about it).
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Old 2009-11-19, 06:29   Link #4686
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
Yes, its nice to see courtesy and etiquette trying to return to the White House (even if he's so "hagajin"-awkward about it).
I agree. Better than their previous "We will bomb you back to Stone Age!".
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Old 2009-11-19, 14:06   Link #4687
Shadow Kira01
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Okada, Yang agree to cooperate on N. Korea, bilateral issues

Quote:
On a bilateral dispute over gas field development in the East China Sea, Okada reiterated the need to commence negotiations toward concluding an agreement on a joint project at an early date and Yang responded that China is urgently considering when to hold working-level talks on the issue.
Quote:
On the North Korean nuclear issue, U.S. President Barack Obama said in Seoul on Thursday that Stephen Bosworth, special representative for North Korean policy, will visit Pyongyang on Dec. 8 as part of efforts to bring the country back to the stalled six-party talks.

Yang said that he welcomed the announcement and also agreed with Okada that the two countries should ''closely communicate'' toward denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula, the ministry official said.
Quote:
Among issues of bilateral concern, Okada and Yang also touched on the issue of tainted Chinese-made frozen dumplings that made people ill in Japan, and agreed to expedite their efforts to create a new framework to ensure food safety.
US soldier prime suspect in Okinawa hit-and-run

Quote:
The incident comes amid strains in U.S.-Japan relations as Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama reviews the American military presence in the country. Some members of his administration have suggested they would like to see some U.S. bases moved off Okinawa, where more than half the 47,000 U.S. troops in Japan are based.
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Old 2009-11-19, 17:09   Link #4688
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cipher View Post
either you bow or shake hands
can't do both!
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Old 2009-11-19, 17:20   Link #4689
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Hasan's Supervisor Warned Army In '07



In May of 2007 Dr. Scott Moran, the chief of psychiatric residents at Walter Reed, outlined his concerns about Hasan in a memo
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...ryId=120540125
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Old 2009-11-19, 21:59   Link #4690
Kamui4356
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mg1942 View Post


In May of 2007 Dr. Scott Moran, the chief of psychiatric residents at Walter Reed, outlined his concerns about Hasan in a memo
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...ryId=120540125
In fairness, that only says he was a lousy psychiatrist and probably shouldn't have been allowed to work with patients. It doesn't really say he was a threat to anyone.
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Old 2009-11-20, 00:38   Link #4691
LynnieS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadow Kira01 View Post
Accordng to this Japan Today article, the victim in this case was found dead with a broken neck, and the car suspected of being involved in the accident had a damaged windshield. The serviceman also apparently suggested to the U.S. investigators that a man may have been ran over.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoko Takeo View Post
There's a reason I don't particularly like the idea of going to America, and what's funny is how I actually work for Bloomberg at the moment so I came across that article earlier. The problem with America is that their economic system encourages individual progression instead of what would be more beneficial to society as a whole. Their healthcare policies are a good example of that. You're as good as dead without health insurance. The situation here is no different. I wouldn't be surprised if someone comes up with food insurance in the US eventually.
Is there actually a nation that considers actions to be taken as being beneficial to society? I can't really think of a single one that, consistently or otherwise, does so without a single ulterior motive. In terms of the U.S., it's very much marketplace- and capitalism-driven - something that, to be honest, departed from the ideals espoused by their Founding Fathers awhile ago. For health care, IMHO, yes and no; for the wealthy and the poor, medical care is available. The rich can pay, and the poor has the state paying. It's, unfortunately, the middle class that is most at risk. Perhaps when the Democrats lose their majority in Congress in 2010, change will be possible.

The sad part of this article, IMHO, is that the U.S. is - or can be - actually fairly self-sufficient in terms of food production. A lot of things will need to change, though, in order to get the food out to the people.
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Last edited by LynnieS; 2009-11-20 at 00:50.
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Old 2009-11-20, 06:04   Link #4692
Narona
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnieS View Post
Is there actually a nation that considers actions to be taken as being beneficial to society? I can't really think of a single one that, consistently or otherwise, does so without a single ulterior motive. In terms of the U.S., it's very much marketplace- and capitalism-driven - something that, to be honest, departed from the ideals espoused by their Founding Fathers awhile ago. For health care, IMHO, yes and no; for the wealthy and the poor, medical care is available. The rich can pay, and the poor has the state paying. It's, unfortunately, the middle class that is most at risk. Perhaps when the Democrats lose their majority in Congress in 2010, change will be possible.
I would not go as far as saying that the french governments, politicians, and people (because not only those who are part of the governments can raise their voices) are all good and altruist but the general mentality of the people is different than in the US.

In France, the "social" part/mentality (which is BTW seen as "communist" and heavily hated by a lot of americans) is important, and even the current government can't do whatever it wants without taking that in account. And a lot of french actually don't understand how many americans can be so self centered and against for example the healthcare reform.
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Old 2009-11-20, 06:19   Link #4693
Tsuyoshi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnieS View Post
Is there actually a nation that considers actions to be taken as being beneficial to society? I can't really think of a single one that, consistently or otherwise, does so without a single ulterior motive. In terms of the U.S., it's very much marketplace- and capitalism-driven - something that, to be honest, departed from the ideals espoused by their Founding Fathers awhile ago.
There is. Look at either Norway or Sweden, I can't remember which of the two. But anyways, the point I'm trying to make there is pretty much what you said. The US is far more capitalism-driven compared to other countries. Virtually everything is privatized. In Europe, most countries' government operate public services like transportation and healthcare. The UK rail system is largely state owned, such as Transport For London, where the Mayor of London is responsible for it. The Education system is run by the government, and you have state-run General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE's) which is run in almost every British school nationally and internationally. I took GCSE's in a British International School and Saudi Arabia, for instance. I'm just laying out some examples here.

The thing is, a lot of activities are much better if the government is running them, like the example of public transportation which, even by definition of the word itself, should be public, not privatized. Capitalism has its pros in the sense that it encourages competition in some areas, but competition can sometimes be more harmful in other sectors, as not everyone will end up having access to a service they are entitled to as human beings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnieS View Post
For health care, IMHO, yes and no; for the wealthy and the poor, medical care is available. The rich can pay, and the poor has the state paying. It's, unfortunately, the middle class that is most at risk. Perhaps when the Democrats lose their majority in Congress in 2010, change will be possible.
The example of either Norway or Sweden is a great example of healthcare being accessible to anyone due to this simple fact: it is free. People need healthcare almost as much as they need water, and programs are run entirely by the government. It's not impossible. If the US spent more money on healthcare instead of focusing so much on fictitious terrorism, they'd be more than capable of doing that as well.

EDIT: To whoever just negged me, you obviously didn't get what I mean. I call it fictitious not because I have no concern over the people families lost. Sure, it's tragic that so many people died. But just because people died doesn't make war right, nor does it make terrorism real. It's an idea that the Bush administration created for its own purposes. Think what you want. If you want to tell me that I said those deaths are wasted, so be it. That's what I believe. And next time, leave your name in the comment. Coward.

Last edited by Tsuyoshi; 2009-11-20 at 06:35.
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Old 2009-11-20, 09:30   Link #4694
Kamui4356
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoko Takeo View Post
EDIT: To whoever just negged me, you obviously didn't get what I mean. I call it fictitious not because I have no concern over the people families lost. Sure, it's tragic that so many people died. But just because people died doesn't make war right, nor does it make terrorism real. It's an idea that the Bush administration created for its own purposes. Think what you want. If you want to tell me that I said those deaths are wasted, so be it. That's what I believe. And next time, leave your name in the comment. Coward.
Here's what you said: "If the US spent more money on healthcare instead of focusing so much on fictitious terrorism, they'd be more than capable of doing that as well."

That's not really something that can be misunderstood. In fact you're clarification still says the same thing and seems to infer that you're one of those nutty truthers who think the US government did 9-11 itself. Not to mention that it's not an issue with the amount of money the US spends on healthcare. The US already spends more on healthcare than any other nation. The problem is the system is set up to generate the maximum profit for companies, not the best possible medical outcome for people. That's what needs to be fixed. The rest of your post is really no better. While I'm not the one who gave you that neg rep, I would say you likely earned it.
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Old 2009-11-20, 14:46   Link #4695
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I really don't like any Western government I've studied, the US included, but I think you're mischaracterizing the US a bit, Yoko Takeo. There are lots of public institutions. You used transportation and education as examples of publicly-owned services present in the UK but not in the US. Unless I've misinterpreted you, you're completely wrong since the US has both of these things operated publicly as well.
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Old 2009-11-20, 18:45   Link #4696
mg1942
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Apocalypse Fatigue: Losing the Public on Climate Change

A mostly decent article on American perception of the climate change noise.

http://e360.yale.edu/content/feature.msp?id=2210
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Old 2009-11-21, 03:01   Link #4697
Jinto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mg1942 View Post
A mostly decent article on American perception of the climate change noise.

http://e360.yale.edu/content/feature.msp?id=2210
Quote:
Skeptics say the gig is up: Americans have finally figured out that global warming is a hoax. Climate activists blame skeptics for sowing doubts about climate science. Pew’s Andrew Kohut, who conducted the survey, says it’s (mostly) the economy, stupid. And some folks have concluded that Americans, with our high levels of disbelief in evolution, are just too stupid or too anti-science to sort it all out.
I like to add something to this. The average american is quiet proud of the USA. The inconvenience of being the worlds number 1(2) polluter isn't exactly positive. So inconvenience is not just an economical but also a social problem. Means, to some extent its also some sort of mentality that oneself is the good guy and therefore one cannot do bad things. So things must be false. (admittedly that certainly plays just a minor role, but it is one of many ideological drivers sitting in the subconscious...)

Quote:
The truth is both simpler and more complicated. It is simpler in the sense that most Americans just aren’t paying a whole lot of attention. Between

being asked about things like whether they would provide CPR to save the life of a pet (most pet owners say yes ) or whether they would allow their child to be given the swine flu vaccine (a third of parents say no), pollsters occasionally get around to asking Americans what they think about global warming. When they do, Americans find a variety of ways to tell us that they don’t think about it very much at all.
Maybe a certain part of the people does not think much about anything in general (thats the same with people everywhere), they are just in line with the general mood in a society (that is more convenient - one need not think so much) - some of them even think they have a point of view which they just cannot back up (that would require thinking). That does not stop them of being vocal about it...

The article raises more interesting points, like for example:

Quote:
First, climate change seems tailor-made to be a low priority for most people. The threat is distant in both time and space. It is difficult to visualize. And it is difficult to identify a clearly defined enemy. Coal executives may deny that global warming exists, but at the end of the day they’re just in it for a buck, not hiding in caves in Pakistan plotting new and exotic ways to kill us.
I think if we substract capitalist thinking for a moment (which prefers short term success over long term sustainability) that this indirectly hardens evidence for the good guy problem I was talking about.
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Old 2009-11-21, 05:46   Link #4698
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http://gizmodo.com/5409588/cop-taser...throwing-a-fit

Quote:
Get this: the mother called police because her child was throwing a fit about showering before going to bed. When the officer arrived the girl was kicking and screaming on the floor and the mother suggested that she should be tasered. Instead of saying something like "I don't have time for this crap lady" and calling out child protective services, the officer picked up the girl and carried her into the living room. At that point the girl was reported to be "kicking violently" and one of those kicks struck the officer square in the balls. The officer then proceeded to taser the girl in the back, handcuff her and drag her off to the Western Arkansas Youth Shelter.
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Old 2009-11-21, 08:06   Link #4699
mg1942
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Climate-gate?

Climate scientists emails hacked and released.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/21/sc...21climate.html
http://wattsupwiththat.com/2009/11/1...iles-released/
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Old 2009-11-21, 12:53   Link #4700
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Quote:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/18/wo...r=1&ref=africa

Prime Minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero told reporters that the Spanish tuna boat, the Alakrana, captured on Oct. 2, was steaming toward “safer waters” and that its crew members were “safe and sound.” But officials declined to comment on reports that Spain had paid a ransom of nearly $3.5 million. Asked if a ransom had been paid, Mr. Zapatero said, “The government did what it had to do.”
the Spanish Armada was once the most fear navy force in the ocean, what happen to the Hidalgo Pride that once struck fear in all on the ocean who saw the Spanish Flag?
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