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Old 2009-12-13, 14:36   Link #3361
-KarumA-
(。☉౪ ⊙。)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irenicus View Post
'Tis a word so quaint that thou darest not thread?
aye, thank you so much dear sir
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Old 2009-12-14, 07:29   Link #3362
risingstar3110
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I have a quick silly question:

Was trying to download a video file, but accidentally clicked "open" instead. But since even when it "open", it still need to be downloaded into my computer first. So i tracked down that file and got it...

The only problem is: when i cut and paste, it mentioned about how this is the "read only" file only. Does it matter in this case (a video file) ? The size seems to be about right.
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Old 2009-12-14, 11:15   Link #3363
Azuma Denton
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Silly Question from me...

Recently i just read a manga called Yandere Kanojo...
http://www.mangaupdates.com/series.html?id=41619
Apparently this title has two version...
One is Gangan Online's version (currently scanlated until ch 3)
One is Gangan Joker's version (currently scanlated until ch 2)


My question is which one is ongoing one?

Thanks in advance...
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Old 2009-12-14, 11:22   Link #3364
Cipher
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The word "I" is used to refer to the person speaking and its simple because its one letter and it says exactly what it means. but what about "you", why isn't that simply made into "u", why did they bother making those extra letters (YO).?
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Old 2009-12-14, 12:40   Link #3365
Ansalem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cipher View Post
The word "I" is used to refer to the person speaking and its simple because its one letter and it says exactly what it means. but what about "you", why isn't that simply made into "u", why did they bother making those extra letters (YO).?
The etymological origins of the words for "I" and "you" are not related to the English alphabet, despite being homophones for the letters "i" and "u".
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Old 2009-12-14, 15:22   Link #3366
escimo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by risingstar3110 View Post
I have a quick silly question:

Was trying to download a video file, but accidentally clicked "open" instead. But since even when it "open", it still need to be downloaded into my computer first. So i tracked down that file and got it...

The only problem is: when i cut and paste, it mentioned about how this is the "read only" file only. Does it matter in this case (a video file) ? The size seems to be about right.
If you have the browser or the player open the file is locked, so you need to copy and paste it instead of cut and paste. I'm not sure if closing the player would unlock the file but it will most likely be removed on closing the browser so in that case you need to redownload it.
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Old 2009-12-14, 16:11   Link #3367
JRendell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cipher View Post
The word "I" is used to refer to the person speaking and its simple because its one letter and it says exactly what it means. but what about "you", why isn't that simply made into "u", why did they bother making those extra letters (YO).?
You can only pronounce the word 'you' one way. However, you can pronounce the letter 'u' in different ways. In Early Modern English, the word 'you' was not used, 'thou' was. So I'm putting some logic into assuming that they kept the 'o' and 'u' from 'thou' and made 'you'.

You've also got to remember that letters/words such as 'I' were not created to be beneficially simple.
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Old 2009-12-14, 16:34   Link #3368
Ansalem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRendell View Post
You can only pronounce the word 'you' one way. However, you can pronounce the letter 'u' in different ways. In Early Modern English, the word 'you' was not used, 'thou' was. So I'm putting some logic into assuming that they kept the 'o' and 'u' from 'thou' and made 'you'.
This isn't really the case. Sort of simply put, thou (u in Old English) was the second person singular nominative (meaning it was used in the subject) pronoun. Ye (ge in Old English) was the 2nd person plural nominative pronoun. You (eow in Old English) was basically the plural version of thou when used as the object of the sentence, and also for ye when used as the object of the sentence. The meanings of you and ye merged over time. When the Normans invaded England, use of French was wide spread and the meaning of you was influenced by the French word vous, which is both used as a plural and as a respectful word for the singular. So you began to be used instead of thou to address superiors in the singular in a polite manner, and eventually became common usage for all 2nd personal pronouns, singular and plural.
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Old 2009-12-14, 16:46   Link #3369
JRendell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ansalem View Post
This isn't really the case. Sort of simply put, thou (u in Old English) was the second person singular nominative (meaning it was used in the subject) pronoun. Ye (ge in Old English) was the 2nd person plural nominative pronoun. You (eow in Old English) was basically the plural version of thou when used as the object of the sentence, and also for ye when used as the object of the sentence. The meanings of you and ye merged over time. When the Normans invaded England, use of French was wide spread and the meaning of you was influenced by the French word vous, which is both used as a plural and as a respectful word for the singular. So you began to be used instead of thou to address superiors in the singular in a polite manner, and eventually became common usage for all 2nd personal pronouns, singular and plural.
Sorted, cheers for clearing that up
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Old 2009-12-14, 23:10   Link #3370
Cipher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRendell View Post
You can only pronounce the word 'you' one way. However, you can pronounce the letter 'u' in different ways. In Early Modern English, the word 'you' was not used, 'thou' was. So I'm putting some logic into assuming that they kept the 'o' and 'u' from 'thou' and made 'you'.

You've also got to remember that letters/words such as 'I' were not created to be beneficially simple.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ansalem View Post
This isn't really the case. Sort of simply put, thou (u in Old English) was the second person singular nominative (meaning it was used in the subject) pronoun. Ye (ge in Old English) was the 2nd person plural nominative pronoun. You (eow in Old English) was basically the plural version of thou when used as the object of the sentence, and also for ye when used as the object of the sentence. The meanings of you and ye merged over time. When the Normans invaded England, use of French was wide spread and the meaning of you was influenced by the French word vous, which is both used as a plural and as a respectful word for the singular. So you began to be used instead of thou to address superiors in the singular in a polite manner, and eventually became common usage for all 2nd personal pronouns, singular and plural.
why didn't they just made it simpler....
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Old 2009-12-15, 00:19   Link #3371
dragon4dudes
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Because the there was too much simplicity. Lol

No actually English is dervied from Germanic languages, but is also related to French. I couldn't tell you which language goes a certain word is actually derived from.

Just a note, languages usually aren't decided on the spot. There isn't some person or group that said, "I have created this language and we're all going to use it from now on." (Be pretty weird) Though I think Latin and Greek had something like that happen...

In languages that don't really use an alphabet, such as Chinese, characters are dervied from objects of similarity. "Cow" in written Chinese look like a cow's head. These characters tend to change to simplicity. (ie from traditional to simplified Chinese)

Words from alphabetical languages (ie English, French, German, Russian, etc) Tend to be borrowed from one language and may be morphed due to phonetics or to match the alphabet. "Cliche" technically should be spelled "clich" but there is not accent in English. Sometimes words undergo a change in one nation but not another which speaks the same language. For example, American English - color, British English - colour.

Wow I don't think I really helped with the question, but after typing this, it seems to be a waste to delete it. lol.
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Old 2009-12-15, 00:37   Link #3372
SuperSaiyanOver9000
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what does desu mean

I see it everywhere and say it all the time claiming everywhere needs more of it
for all I know it could be a curse
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Old 2009-12-15, 04:50   Link #3373
oompa loompa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSaiyanOver9000 View Post
what does desu mean

I see it everywhere and say it all the time claiming everywhere needs more of it
for all I know it could be a curse
literally?.. probably closest to the verb to be right?
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Old 2009-12-15, 05:06   Link #3374
Cipher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragon4dudes View Post
Because the there was too much simplicity. Lol

No actually English is dervied from Germanic languages, but is also related to French. I couldn't tell you which language goes a certain word is actually derived from.

Just a note, languages usually aren't decided on the spot. There isn't some person or group that said, "I have created this language and we're all going to use it from now on." (Be pretty weird) Though I think Latin and Greek had something like that happen...

In languages that don't really use an alphabet, such as Chinese, characters are dervied from objects of similarity. "Cow" in written Chinese look like a cow's head. These characters tend to change to simplicity. (ie from traditional to simplified Chinese)

Words from alphabetical languages (ie English, French, German, Russian, etc) Tend to be borrowed from one language and may be morphed due to phonetics or to match the alphabet. "Cliche" technically should be spelled "clich" but there is not accent in English. Sometimes words undergo a change in one nation but not another which speaks the same language. For example, American English - color, British English - colour.

Wow I don't think I really helped with the question, but after typing this, it seems to be a waste to delete it. lol.
not a waste at all. I think they, whoever's in charge, should make it simpler *now*.
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Old 2009-12-15, 05:41   Link #3375
Ansalem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cipher View Post
not a waste at all. I think they, whoever's in charge, should make it simpler *now*.
Well, there's not exactly an English language lord who can whimsically make official changes. Besides, there's plenty enough corruption of the language without making internet and texting shorthand part of the language. I can just imagine high school kids learning "new" Shakespeare. "Romeo, Romeo, where4 r u Romeo?" Also, while we're on that quote, "wherefore" means why, not where, so all those "over here" jokes don't make any sense.
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Old 2009-12-15, 09:11   Link #3376
Vexx
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There's no one "in charge" of English.... its a polyglot mess of words strung together from a variety of cultures over a thousand years. Of *course* its going to be very messy. At least it dropped most of the case structures and "noun gender" that its cousins have (European languages).... but it has all sorts of oddities and irregular bits in every corner of the language. And lately we've been adding all sorts of asian-sourced words just to make it more exciting as well as reverse-importing spanish and other languages.

For a good lesson in how a language evolves -- read Shakespeare..... then read Beowulf. They're both in "english", just from different time periods. Languages evolve. If *enough* people use "U" rather than "You" ... it will probably become the norm... but it has enough potential to confuse that I doubt it. I'm still waiting for an "official" plural-you ("youse", "ya'll", "you guys") to come back.
Beowulf prologue:
Spoiler for Old English:


Shakespeare (Hamlet speaking):
Spoiler for "Middle English":


English according to Richard Lederer in the Urban Dictionary:
Spoiler for Urban Dictionary quote:

And my favorite way to describe the language:
a language that lurks in dark alleys, beats up other languages and rifles through their pockets for spare vocabulary

Last edited by Vexx; 2009-12-15 at 09:36.
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Old 2009-12-15, 09:34   Link #3377
Cipher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ansalem View Post
Well, there's not exactly an English language lord who can whimsically make official changes. Besides, there's plenty enough corruption of the language without making internet and texting shorthand part of the language. I can just imagine high school kids learning "new" Shakespeare. "Romeo, Romeo, where4 r u Romeo?" Also, while we're on that quote, "wherefore" means why, not where, so all those "over here" jokes don't make any sense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
There's no one "in charge" of English.... its a polyglot mess of words strung together from a variety of cultures over a thousand years. Of *course* its going to be very messy. At least it dropped most of the case structures and "noun gender" that its cousins have (European languages).... but it has all sorts of oddities and irregular bits in every corner of the language. And lately we've been adding all sorts of asian-sourced words just to make it more exciting as well as reverse-importing spanish and other languages.

For a good lesson in how things evolve -- read Shakespeare..... then read Beowulf. They're both in "english", just from different time periods.
Beowulf prologue:
Spoiler for Old English:


Shakespeare (Hamlet speaking):
Spoiler for "middle english":


English according to Richard Lederer in the Urban Dictionary:
Spoiler for Urban Dictionary quote:

And my favorite way to describe the language:
a language that lurks in dark alleys, beats up other languages and rifles through their pockets for spare vocabulary
new info for me. Language is a hard product to assemble with simplicity.
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Old 2009-12-15, 17:08   Link #3378
dragon4dudes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
And my favorite way to describe the language:
a language that lurks in dark alleys, beats up other languages and rifles through their pockets for spare vocabulary
That's pretty correct. Much of English is borrowed vocab. Escargot, use of "etc" (et cetera), uh... Can't think of anymore off the top of my head.
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Old 2009-12-15, 19:28   Link #3379
SuperSaiyanOver9000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oompa loompa View Post
literally?.. probably closest to the verb to be right?
so I can put it after everything desu
lol!
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Old 2009-12-15, 19:39   Link #3380
Ansalem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSaiyanOver9000 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by oompa loompa View Post
literally?.. probably closest to the verb to be right?
so I can put it after everything desu
lol!
It's a copula, so no, and please don't.
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