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Old 2009-12-07, 19:35   Link #101
Siegel Clyne
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The Classical Influence on Film Music

Ralph Vaughan Williams's friend and fellow British composer Gustav Holst (1874-1934) completed his most famous work, the seven-movement symphonic suite The Planets, in 1916. It has been widely recognized as a major influence on film music, particularly in Hollywood.

Hollywood film composer John Williams (1932-) has liberally borrowed from classical composers like Holst and Russian-born Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) in his film scores, such as the Star Wars movies and Jaws (1975).

Gustav Holst / Mars, the Bringer of War from The Planets



Igor Stravinsky / The Rite of Spring (1912/1913) Part 1

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Old 2009-12-07, 20:06   Link #102
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My favourite movement of the Holst is definitely Saturn, the ending is so haunting and engrossing.
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Old 2009-12-08, 04:36   Link #103
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Classical influence/arrangements of anime music

Does anybody know where Hisaishi took his inspiration from? My horizon on Classical music is limited, I know I have heard parts before, but can't relate them.
How would you classify these pieces? 'Third Movement' is missing, though...



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Old 2009-12-08, 08:09   Link #104
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To me, it seems more like Hisaishi is influenced by more recent Western film composers than by classical ones directly. His work on Princess Mononoke, for example, makes me think of Goldsmith or James Horner more than anything, occasionally combined with more new-age, sometimes Eastern influenced, melodies.

Of course, as mentioned above, composers like Jame Horner derive their influence from classical composers in the first place....

Out of the Ghibli composers, I feel that Nomi Yuji (The Cat Returns) is the one with the most direct sense of classicism in his writing. A sample of his work.
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Last edited by Theowne; 2009-12-08 at 08:19.
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Old 2009-12-20, 06:33   Link #105
Siegel Clyne
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Hallelujah, It's Christmastime Again (No, Not Charlie Brown)

Since it is that time of the season again...

The UK's Paul McCreesh leads his Gabrieli Consort & Players, one of the world's foremost HIP (Historically Informed Performance) ensembles, in a rousing rendition of the famous "Hallelujah" Chorus from George Frideric Handel's Messiah, the 1754 Foundling Hospital Version.

Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah / Gabrieli Consort & Players, conducted by Paul McCreesh

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Old 2009-12-23, 03:10   Link #106
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An Italian High Renaissance Mass for Christmas

Paul McCreesh conducts the Gabrieli Consort and Players in the Gloria from the eight-part Christmas Mass Missa Hodie Christus natus est by Italian Renaissance composer Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (1525-1594).

This parody Mass is based on a Christmas motet for eight parts by Palestrina, Hodie Christus natus est (Today Christ is Born).

Gloria from Missa Hodie Christus natus est by Palestrina / Gabrieli Consort & Players conducted by Paul McCreesh

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Old 2009-12-24, 06:51   Link #107
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Beautiful Renaissance Christmas Music: An English Carol and a Spanish Motet

The Coventry Carol (Lully Lullay) is a Christmas carol which dates back to the 16th Century in Coventry, England.

The Choir of Westminster Cathedral, London - the primary Roman Catholic Cathedral in England and Wales - under the leadership of then Master of Music David Hill (1982-1987) performs a traditional setting of the beautiful Coventry Carol in the majestic Neo-Byzantine basilica of Westminster Cathedral, while the Choir of King's College, Cambridge - the most famous Anglican collegiate choir in the UK - under the leadership of Director of the Music Stephen Cleobury sings a lovely modern setting of the Coventry Carol by the British composer Kenneth Leighton (1929-1988) in the splendid English Perpendiular Gothic building of King's College Chapel, Cambridge:

Coventry Carol (Lully Lullay) / Choir of Westminster Cathedral conducted by David Hill



Coventry Carol (Lully Lullay) by Kenneth Leighton / Choir of King's College, Cambridge conducted by Stephen Cleobury



The Choir of Westminster Cathedral returns and performs once again under the leadership of David Hill in a gorgeous rendition of the famous 16th Century motet setting of the Latin responsorial chant from the Christmas Matins, O magnum mysterium (O Great Mystery), by the great Spanish Renaissance composer Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611):

O magnum mysterium by Tomás Luis de Victoria / Choir of Westminster Cathedral conducted by David Hill


Last edited by Siegel Clyne; 2009-12-24 at 07:22.
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Old 2009-12-26, 21:02   Link #108
Gotank
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Silly question, but what phrase do you people use to reference stuff like film scores and such? I used to call them contemporary classical music, but some people seem to think I'm referring to atonal stuff by John Cage and such. Is there a more precise term to describe classical music composed now?
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Old 2009-12-27, 15:04   Link #109
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When someone says "contemporary classical music" my mind also jumps to atonal/serial music of the mid to late 1900s.

Film scores are film scores. I wouldn't call them anything-classical music, because to me, classical music refers to art/concert music specifically and I've never heard many people refer to film scores as classical music seriously (apart from non-music types who call it classical because it features an orchestra).
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Last edited by Theowne; 2009-12-27 at 16:56.
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Old 2009-12-27, 23:37   Link #110
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Then I suppose our definitions differ. What would you say is the defining aspect of 'classical music'? If film scores are performed independently as 'art' in a 'concert' setting, would it suddenly become classical music?

And by that definition, I'm not sure if we can call atonal/serial music anything-classical music either. Judging from some of those pieces, artistry is the last thing on the composers' minds.
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Old 2009-12-28, 04:40   Link #111
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Quote:
Judging from some of those pieces, artistry is the last thing on the composers' minds.
Well, I know many people who listen to a particularly loud Rachmaninoff piece and say the same thing, many of Debussy's contemporaries found his music unbearably dissonant and artistically vapid as well. I don't particularly like atonal music myself, but I don't doubt that they believe their music is artistic.

Quote:
What would you say is the defining aspect of 'classical music'?
Good question. When I hear the term, what I imagine is a lineage of Western art music which progressively builds on previous traditions. Serial contemporary music, to some extent, can be seen as a part of that line, building on the mileu of composers like Bartok or even Debussy (even if not many like the result) so some people, not all, would classify it as the modern "classical music".

Quote:
If film scores are performed independently as 'art' in a 'concert' setting, would it suddenly become classical music?
Many film scores are already performed in concert settings, though usually as "pops" concerts. If you mean if they were composed for concert settings, then that would certainly have a stronger case, but then it isn't a film score. I suppose it's hard to explain, or rather, I'm not good at explaining it.
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Old 2012-07-14, 09:07   Link #112
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Necroing an under-appreciated thread.

I love classical music in general. Most other music just doesn't satisfy me in the same way.

Lately, I've had an interest in Mahler's works, and I'm listening to his symphonies in publication order, only moving on to the next after I've acquired some appreciation and understanding of the last one. I've only gotten to his 3rd so far, but every one of his symphonies is like a movie in itself, encompassing lots of drama, moods, and emotions, and culminating in a mind-blowing ending. His music, among those of many other composers, simply makes me feel happy to be alive.

Mahler's music is very long and heavy, though, so a beginner would need to exercise much patience to truly enjoy his music. And knowledge of sonata form helps a lot.
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Old 2012-07-14, 12:37   Link #113
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Drive-by posting in classical music threads:
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Old 2012-09-15, 20:43   Link #114
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Yay, someone revived the thread.. although there hasn't been much activity in here for a very long time.. Thought I'd drop in to show my support for classical music and instrumentals over all. Anyone around!?

I'm a frequent patron of the local symphony orchestra here in Toronto and am a big fan of many composers that span the ages: Beethoven, Mozart, Ravel, Rachmaninov, Mahler, Wagner, Tchaikovsky, Shostakovitch.. So many! -- Unfortunately I never had any music lessons when I was younger.. so my admiration has always been from a distance..

Also, I know this isn't strictly classical, but I've been really into Andrea Bocelli recently and found a youtube video of him performing Con Te Partiro with Sarah Brightman! Awesome! I already posted this on "music stuck in my head" ..

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Old 2013-04-28, 10:14   Link #115
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What is fascinating about this video is that the uploader also includes a visual bar-graph score. Anyone taking a piano lesson will no doubt find this helpful, as the graphic segments the music into simple structures.
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Old 2013-04-28, 12:34   Link #116
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My favorite Ockeghem piece ever. Also probably one of my favorite pieces of music ever.

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Old 2013-07-01, 07:53   Link #117
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Hmm, my favourites would be Beethoven, Bach, Vivaldi, Rachmaninoff and Tschaikovsky.
I recently enrolled in violin lessons because I want to be able to play some easy classical pieces for my personal enjoyment. I hope it goes well. It's so difficult! Oh well...
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