AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > General > General Chat

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2010-10-06, 05:37   Link #1521
JMvS
Rawrrr!
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: CH aka Chocaholic Heaven
Age: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChainLegacy View Post
What type of minority problems are you referring to? I've heard about the problems the Ainu have faced, which saddens me since they are a particularly interesting ethnic group (I'm especially intrigued by the theory that they have connection to Amerindians... you can certainly see the cultural similarities). They even have genetic similarities to the Andaman islanders, who are thought to represent the first migration of humans out of Africa.

Edit: Actually I found some short videos about the topic if anyone is interested in the Ainu's struggles in Japan. The second one even comes with some Engrish reporting, lol.
Well the connection with Amerindians is not that surprising, for if we consider the Bering Land bridge migration theory and a map, given the history of population in these areas, there's a clear continuum with Siberian peoples.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrestrial Dream View Post
And don't forget burakumin, which are a sizeable minority of native outcast.

Regarding the video, it was meh...

First we had the usual stereotypes regarding Japanese peoples and culture. I admit the eye enlarging function made me smile.

I really facepalmed when the fact on food and water strayed to heavy and out of place moralizing... (Bluefin tuna on the other hand is a classic).

Regarding suicide and prosperity... well it's also a quite common knowledge, and Japan is not that unique in this regard (South Koreans, Finns and Swiss would know about that).

And what the heck was that conclusion???
__________________
JMvS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-10-09, 20:28   Link #1522
Terrestrial Dream
勇者
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Tesla Leicht Institute
Age: 24
The Shinsengumi seems to be quite prevalent in Japanese media, any particular reason why they are like that?
__________________
Terrestrial Dream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-10-10, 05:15   Link #1523
Tri-ring
The Censor Bat
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Land of the rising sun
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrestrial Dream View Post
The Shinsengumi seems to be quite prevalent in Japanese media, any particular reason why they are like that?
The end of the Edo period is said to be the dawn of the new era where Japan ushers into the western world from the east. This was not without resistance and bloodshed where terrorism clashes with the conservative Edo shogunate duels it out.
On one side we see Saigo, Katsura and Sakamoto wanting create a new democratic government with the Emperor as a symbol while the conservative Edo bureaucrats wanted to maintain the status quo.
Shinsengumi was the police force in the brutal Kyoto district where most terror cells operated, seen now as a symbol of the fading era of samurais and Katana clashing duels.
__________________
Tri-ring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-10-10, 17:14   Link #1524
Terrestrial Dream
勇者
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Tesla Leicht Institute
Age: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tri-ring View Post
The end of the Edo period is said to be the dawn of the new era where Japan ushers into the western world from the east. This was not without resistance and bloodshed where terrorism clashes with the conservative Edo shogunate duels it out.
On one side we see Saigo, Katsura and Sakamoto wanting create a new democratic government with the Emperor as a symbol while the conservative Edo bureaucrats wanted to maintain the status quo.
Shinsengumi was the police force in the brutal Kyoto district where most terror cells operated, seen now as a symbol of the fading era of samurais and Katana clashing duels.
So it would be safe to say that they are the last romanticism aspect of Japan?
__________________
Terrestrial Dream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-10-10, 17:45   Link #1525
Tri-ring
The Censor Bat
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Land of the rising sun
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrestrial Dream View Post
So it would be safe to say that they are the last romanticism aspect of Japan?
Yeah I think you can say that.
To the Japanese they are the last symbol of the samurai age with all the katana wielding glories.
It's interesting since between Miyamoto Musashi and the Shinsengumi there are not many notable samurais. I guess it shows how peaceful the Edo period was.
__________________
Tri-ring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-10-24, 19:50   Link #1526
Sing4ever9
Member
 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: In America.
Hey, does anyone know what the Japanese find scary in terms of death or being killed?

For Halloween, I'm dressing up as a dead geisha and I want to be culturally coordinated in terms of what is considered to be frightening because sometimes, especially in movies, we focus more on what we fear more than what that culture truly fears.
Sing4ever9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-10-25, 01:52   Link #1527
TinyRedLeaf
. . .
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sing4ever9 View Post
Hey, does anyone know what the Japanese find scary in terms of death or being killed?


I swear, if anyone comes trick or treating at my door in a Sadako costume,
I'll hammer her first and ask questions later. o_o


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sing4ever9 View Post
For Halloween, I'm dressing up as a dead geisha and I want to be culturally coordinated in terms of what is considered to be frightening because sometimes, especially in movies, we focus more on what we fear more than what that culture truly fears.
Check out the short-lived Yokai thread, especially the link to Japanese urban myths that milan kyuubi provided.
TinyRedLeaf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-10-25, 06:26   Link #1528
cheyannew
PolyPerson!
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Northern VA
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
I swear, if anyone comes trick or treating at my door in a Sadako costume,
I'll hammer her first and ask questions later. o_o


hahahaha my hubby is 1/2 Japanese and has that thick straight black hair (down to his waist); I tease him EVERY year about either dressing up as Sadako, or letting me toss elf ears on him...

hasn't worked in 14 years though, but I'll keep trying!

I have to say I've never seen someone dressed as sadako though...
__________________
"...we are wolves in a flock of sheep. We are the hunters. We are the Alphas and we are on this Earth to conquer."

RIFT | Division | Side 7 Art Archive
cheyannew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-10-29, 21:10   Link #1529
Vexx
Obey the Darkly Cute ...
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 57
One possible reason the samurai did some of the numbnut things that history records them doing:
samurai-kids-lead-poisoning-cosmetics
http://content.usatoday.com/communit...ng-cosmetics/1
Vexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-10-31, 18:16   Link #1530
thevil1
Adventure ∀logger
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Looking for Reason to hear it's voice
Age: 4
Send a message via AIM to thevil1
Does Japan have a Halloween equivalent?
The reason I'm wondering is since they are already a pretty westernized country, and Christianity is moderately popular there, I was thinking that maybe they developed there own version of Halloween.
__________________
A hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles - Christopher Reeve
thevil1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-11-01, 07:00   Link #1531
Mystique
Honyaku no Hime
*Fansubber
 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: In the eastern capital of the islands of the rising suns...
Quote:
Originally Posted by thevil1 View Post
Does Japan have a Halloween equivalent?
The reason I'm wondering is since they are already a pretty westernized country, and Christianity is moderately popular there, I was thinking that maybe they developed there own version of Halloween.
Christianity's values and rules are virtually unknown.
However commericalised Christian holidays from America (it being their main influence) is a must.
They celebrate Halloween as they do Christian weddings, Christmas and Valentine's Day, with all the glitz and glamour without having a clue about its origins (nor do I think they care, they just take the fun).
Then again, I doubt many in the West are aware that Nov 1st is "All Hallows Day" either... :\

Mid Sep is the time for department stores to get their Halloween displays up (as of today, it's all changed to Christmas now), October is the month where Disneyland go Halloween crazy and school kids design their calanders to themes of halloween.
It's just something to mark October by methinks, but as it is with the West, Halloween = open cosplay day.
This year it was on a Saturday, so lots of parties in clubs and so on and many coplayers in the streets of Shibuya and Harajuku when I walked past last weekend

Now onto lovers day or wedding proposal day!
*cough*
I mean Japanese "Christmas".
__________________

Worrying is like a rocking chair. It gives you something to do, but it doesn't get you anywhere. - Van Wilder
"If you ain't laughin', you ain't livin'." - Carlos Mencia
Mystique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-11-01, 07:38   Link #1532
Chimuts
Call me Anego!~
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: In a room as blue as the sky, as cool as the autumn wind and as quiet as the desert
Send a message via MSN to Chimuts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique View Post
Now onto lovers day or wedding proposal day!
*cough*
I mean Japanese "Christmas".
Can festivals be counted as lovers' day too?
__________________
Chimuts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-11-01, 08:00   Link #1533
Tri-ring
The Censor Bat
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Land of the rising sun
But then how many Christians really understand the meaning of said to be Christian holidays/celebrations?
For example Christmas, said to be the birthday of Christ but actually an adopted ritual of pagan origin celebrating the winter equinox to endorse pagans to convert to Christianity devised by the Roman Catholics.
Christ's birthday is now speculated by scholars to be sometime in mid April studying the biblical account comparing them with meteorological data and customs.
Halloween is also I believe a pagan celebration to celebrate year's harvest.
Exchange of rings is a Roman custom before Christianity set in.
__________________
Tri-ring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-11-01, 18:57   Link #1534
Vexx
Obey the Darkly Cute ...
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by thevil1 View Post
Does Japan have a Halloween equivalent?
The reason I'm wondering is since they are already a pretty westernized country, and Christianity is moderately popular there, I was thinking that maybe they developed there own version of Halloween.
Historically... Oban (in August) would come closer to "commemorating the dead and they might visit" ... a period when the veil between the supernatural and the natural is thinner. After all, that's the original tune of Samhain/Halloween (the Celt New Year).

As for the modern variant - kids have taken up the costume and trick'r'treat at least in the cities but it goes no deeper than that.

Christianity is not "popular" in Japan -- it barely shows up on the percentages. Some of the *holidays* (e.g. the commercial secular with a bit of pagan version of Christmas, Valentine's Day, etc) are popular.
Vexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-11-01, 19:44   Link #1535
Tri-ring
The Censor Bat
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Land of the rising sun
Another candidate would be new years day in some region where Namahage roams from house to house seeking bad children, another would be Setsubun on February 3rd celebrating the coming of Spring festival, throwing roasted soybeans to ward off the Oni out of the home. In cleaning up as part of bringing luck in, it is customary to eat roasted soybeans, one for each year of one's life, and in some areas, one for each year of one's life plus one more for bringing good luck for the year to come.
__________________
Tri-ring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-11-02, 18:02   Link #1536
meko
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: NY
If you mean by kids getting free candy, treats and toys, probably こどもの日 (kids day) or 七五三 (toddler's day).
meko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-11-12, 18:32   Link #1537
Vexx
Obey the Darkly Cute ...
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 57
Robot plays her part in a Japanese play in a typecasting-of-the-good-kind

http://www.reuters.com/news/video/st...eoChannel=2602

(video article)
Vexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-11-20, 17:18   Link #1538
Terrestrial Dream
勇者
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Tesla Leicht Institute
Age: 24
Any region in Japan that uses word from other country? (except English). I saw one Korean show and in Jeju island some folks were speaking Korean with mixes of little Japanese word. So I am curious if there is a region that uses word from other country, mostly China and Korea, as a result of things like immigrants and the location.
__________________
Terrestrial Dream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-11-21, 08:07   Link #1539
dangodaikazoku
akachan dango
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Dango Planet
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrestrial Dream View Post
Any region in Japan that uses word from other country? (except English). I saw one Korean show and in Jeju island some folks were speaking Korean with mixes of little Japanese word. So I am curious if there is a region that uses word from other country, mostly China and Korea, as a result of things like immigrants and the location.
Gairaigo (外来語) is not only English. Don't forget baito/arubaito from German arbeit, abekku from French avec (albet with a different meaning), gomu from French gomme (eraser), etc. etc.

Not to mention the hundreds of thousands of kanji-based terms imported from China over a thousand years ago.

That said, I kind of get what you mean: a region with an especially high prevalence of more recent borrowings from Chinese and Korean due to immigration, trade and suchlike. I'm curious too

(Little known fact: just found out recently "ramen" is apparently a relatively recent loanward from Chinese! Of course I was always aware that we have the same word in Chinese, but I thought that both countries had been using the same word independently for a long time since Japanese ramen and Chinese lamian are nothing like each other.)
dangodaikazoku is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-11-21, 12:18   Link #1540
LeoXiao
提倡自我工業化
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Vereinigte Staaten
Age: 22
Hm, I always thought "lamian" and "ramen" were the same thing?
LeoXiao is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
culture, discussion, japan, japanese culture

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:42.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
We use Silk.