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Old 2010-12-18, 21:22   Link #1621
Sumeragi
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I'm not sure if it's sad or not. Let's face it: The current roles of the Koushitsu is just..... well, pretty much novelties with the small ultranationalist fringes being fanatical once in a while. Until the Tenno is a true head of state, I rather not go through all the trouble.


And this is coming from a pro-Koushitsu nationalist.
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Old 2010-12-18, 21:53   Link #1622
Taufiq91
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Speaking of youths vs. oldies here, i realized why Japan has such a low birthrate:

-The education system

The Japanese were taught from elementary to either choose work or kids. Whereas the European education system were taught the third option: "Moderation".

I know it's kind of obvious, but no one is doing anything to reform its education system. Animes like Great teacher Onizuka and Toradora has become a subtle critiques and social commentaries on the effects of japanese education on students and teachers.

I despise the education system of Japan not only because of the lack of critical thinking, but also because of the "work vs. kids" mentality the education system teaches.

If Japanese society wants to take itself seriously, they should start doing things like reforming the education system. It all starts with education.

I'm currently making a study on mental health in Japan so i'll talk about that in a few days.
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Old 2010-12-18, 22:00   Link #1623
Sumeragi
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I doubt that it's the problem of education. I tend to think of self-centered hedonism as the real reason. Let's face it: In a society that has herbivore men, you actually except people to have kids?
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Old 2010-12-18, 22:56   Link #1624
Knightrunner
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taufiq91 View Post
Speaking of youths vs. oldies here, i realized why Japan has such a low birthrate:

-The education system

The Japanese were taught from elementary to either choose work or kids. Whereas the European education system were taught the third option: "Moderation".

I know it's kind of obvious, but no one is doing anything to reform its education system. Animes like Great teacher Onizuka and Toradora has become a subtle critiques and social commentaries on the effects of japanese education on students and teachers.

I despise the education system of Japan not only because of the lack of critical thinking, but also because of the "work vs. kids" mentality the education system teaches.

If Japanese society wants to take itself seriously, they should start doing things like reforming the education system. It all starts with education.

I'm currently making a study on mental health in Japan so i'll talk about that in a few days.
I can't wait to see the results of mental health in Japan. You should compare it here in the United States too. Our education system, ways of conduct, or basically everything is scr*wed up.
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Old 2010-12-19, 00:17   Link #1625
TinyRedLeaf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taufiq91 View Post
Speaking of youths vs. oldies here, i realized why Japan has such a low birthrate:

-The education system

The Japanese were taught from elementary to either choose work or kids. Whereas the European education system were taught the third option: "Moderation".

I know it's kind of obvious, but no one is doing anything to reform its education system. Animes like Great teacher Onizuka and Toradora has become a subtle critiques and social commentaries on the effects of japanese education on students and teachers.

I despise the education system of Japan not only because of the lack of critical thinking, but also because of the "work vs. kids" mentality the education system teaches.

If Japanese society wants to take itself seriously, they should start doing things like reforming the education system. It all starts with education.

I'm currently making a study on mental health in Japan so i'll talk about that in a few days.
It's nowhere near that simple, the reasons for Japan's declining birth rate. After all, it's not the only country that is experiencing this demographic trend practically every other developed country is seeing fewer babies every year, with Singapore being among those with the lowest fertility rates in the world. The economic costs of childcare in these countries discourage many from from having large families. And then, there is the issue of personal aspirations; for many people in a world of diverse options, career increasingly comes before family. Some may even decide never to have children, for reasons of their own an unthinkable option in countries where children are still regarded as a necessary investment for the future.

The real problem, to be sure, revolves around women's role in society. Create a system that forces fathers to take equal responsibilities for their children, and a structure that allows breadwinners of nuclear, double-income families to go to work without worrying about childcare, and you're likely to see improvements in the birth rate. It is already happening in Sweden and other Scandinavian countries it can be done elsewhere too.

As for Japan's education system, well, that's another topic altogether.
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Old 2010-12-19, 00:24   Link #1626
Taufiq91
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Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
It's nowhere near that simple, the reasons for Japan's declining birth rate. After all, it's not the only country that is experiencing this demographic trend practically every other developed country is seeing fewer babies every year, with Singapore being among those with the lowest fertility rates in the world. The economic costs of childcare in these countries discourage many from from having large families. And then, there is the issue of personal aspirations; for many people in a world of diverse options, career increasingly comes before family. Some may even decide never to have children, for reasons of their own an unthinkable option in countries where children are still regarded as a necessary investment for the future.

The real problem, to be sure, revolves around women's role in society. Create a system that forces fathers to take equal responsibilities for their children, and a structure that allows breadwinners of nuclear, double-income families to go to work without worrying about childcare, and you're likely to see improvements in the birth rate. It is already happening in Sweden and other Scandinavian countries it can be done elsewhere too.

As for Japan's education system, well, that's another topic altogether.
True that.

The Japanese should learn from how the Scandinavians do it.

But immigration also plays an important factor. Studies show that countries with more bias against immigrants tends to have the lowest birth rates. However, whether or not the effects are good or bad depends on which immigration policy Japan adheres to.
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Old 2010-12-19, 04:31   Link #1627
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Hey, about marriages, is it true, well in what I hear and see on the news, Japanese females are desperate in getting married and have a husband? They say in the news that they go to "tea ceremony schools, seminars for single women, and how to date man seminars??? No offense, I'm just curious."

Hmmm, in ours', we do have many women and nearly all gets marrie, well except those who are bread winners of a family ending up being single or going to the monastery because they feel out of love heheheh
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Old 2010-12-19, 05:35   Link #1628
Sumeragi
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Only when the woman in question does not have a stable method of making a living, etc. Most financially independent women don't really care about husbands.

And I'm somewhat ticked off at your posting style. No offense, but it's sort of a pain to read. Perhaps a little less rambling is in order.
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Old 2010-12-19, 12:22   Link #1629
ChainLegacy
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Sadly, there *is* enormous PUBLIC support for allowing a female emperor and HISTORICALLY, there has been a female ruler or two. It *might* have happened if the Prince hadn't appeared. Still might happen... but I suspect you're going to have to wait until the whole WW2 bunch dies off, ending the ties to that period's "imperial Japan".
Can someone explain to me why the emperor suddenly became this important leadership figure during the imperial Japan era, despite the fact that prior to that point the emperor really didn't matter? Or is this just a case of the textbooks overemphasizing the emperor's role? Historically he was usually just a figurehead.

Last edited by ChainLegacy; 2010-12-19 at 13:03.
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Old 2010-12-19, 13:24   Link #1630
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Can someone explain to me why the emperor suddenly became this important leadership figure during the imperial Japan era, despite the fact that prior to that point the emperor really didn't matter? Or is this just a case of the textbooks overemphasizing the emperor's role? Historically he was usually just a figurehead.
The emperors reign; they seldom ever got the chance to rule, not even the Meiji emperor, the restored monarch of modern Japan.

The history behind the Meiji Restoration is well documented and easily available on the Internet, so I don't think there's much need to rehash it here.

The real answer to your question, if I may hazard a thesis, is that the Japanese have always felt this deep need for symbols to legitimise power (take, for example, the symbolic power of a name chop, an outdated device, to be sure, but still significant nonetheless in modern Japanese business protocol).

During the reign of the Nara and Heian emperors, true power resided with the Fujiwara family, who ruled in the monarchs' name. Shortly after the Minamoto established the first shogunate, true power went to the Hojo regents, who pulled the strings of government in the shoguns' name.

In the latter days of the Tokugawa shogunate, true power lay in the hands of the shogun's closest advisers, who controlled the vast bureaucracy that effectively ruled the country. And when full extent of the shogunate's weakness became exposed at last by the arrival of Perry's "black boats", it became plainly apparent that there would be no room for shoguns in the "new Japan" envisioned by the disenchanted samurai of Satsuma and Chosu.

Hence, the restoration of the emperor. The new rulers of Japan, the Meiji oligarchs, needed a new figurehead for the times. That's all there is to it. The greater goal, make no mistake, is to restore Japan's national pride, and the emperor is merely the symbol of it. Nothing more, nothing less.

'Tis only an accident of history that the oligarchs won the rebellion. Had they lost, the shoguns would still reign (but not truly rule). After centuries of working in a strictly hierarchical society, it seems that the Japanese — even the most ambitious among them — had long since got used to the idea that, unless they are born into the station, they cannot seize what is not rightfully theirs.

They can, on the other hand, effectively hold the ruler hostage, and call the shots from the shadows instead. Indeed, this seems almost like the preferred way to rule — through the status and prestige of pliable figureheads. Even today, true political power in Japan does not reside with the politicians in the open, but with the people we do not actually see.
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Old 2010-12-19, 13:35   Link #1631
ChainLegacy
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It's an interesting theme of Japanese history. First the Bakufu turned the Emperor into a puppet. And then the daimyo warlords turned even the shogun into a puppet. Your theory that the strict hierarchy of Japan makes this an easier mode of operation than simply usurping power out in the open seems plausible.
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Old 2010-12-19, 20:53   Link #1632
Knightrunner
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I think we should celebrate more festivals like they do in Japan here in the United States.
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Old 2010-12-19, 20:53   Link #1633
ZephyrLeanne
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Originally Posted by ChainLegacy View Post
It's an interesting theme of Japanese history. First the Bakufu turned the Emperor into a puppet. And then the daimyo warlords turned even the shogun into a puppet. Your theory that the strict hierarchy of Japan makes this an easier mode of operation than simply usurping power out in the open seems plausible.
But the weirder thing is that between World War I and Word War II, the military moved in to buttress support behind the emperor himself - and started invading China.

That was also when the emperor ceased being a figurehead, until 9 Aug '45, when the Emperor was made powerless again by the US.
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Old 2010-12-19, 21:04   Link #1634
Sumeragi
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The Tenno never really had power during the Imperial era. Any power he technically had was just formal. The only reason the Pacific War ended was that there was a deadlock within the ruling coalition, and thus the Tenno was able to use his formal powers to end the war.

It's unfortunate, but the Tenno has been always a figurehead since the foundation of the Bakufus.
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Old 2010-12-19, 21:08   Link #1635
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I think we should celebrate more festivals like they do in Japan here in the United States.
You realise almost EVERY state government in the US (barring Hawaii) is basically broke? Even NY State, for that.
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Old 2010-12-19, 21:19   Link #1636
Knightrunner
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You realise almost EVERY state government in the US (barring Hawaii) is basically broke? Even NY State, for that.
Celebrating festivals didn't cause the states to be broke. Unwise spending from the previous president and coperations stealing from the middle class and poor cause the economy to go down. Festivals can reduce stress we Americans face. Plus, looking how much fun people have in festivals brings up morale.
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Old 2010-12-19, 21:27   Link #1637
TinyRedLeaf
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I think we should celebrate more festivals like they do in Japan here in the United States.
Almost all folk festivals, not just those in Japan, are rooted in a culture's agrarian past. So, it's usually quite pointless to adopt a foreign culture's festival if you're not celebrating what the festival was originally meant to commemorate.

(You'd otherwise get soulless, commercialised holidays like Christmas, Halloween and Valentine's Day.)

It's not about how "old" or "pretty" a festival looks whenever it's celebrated, but rather about what the festival symbolises for a community. You Americans, for example, have Thanksgiving, a holiday that has special meaning for you, but which is totally meaningless for everyone else in the world.
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Old 2010-12-19, 21:41   Link #1638
Knightrunner
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Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
Almost all folk festivals, not just those in Japan, are rooted in a culture's agrarian past. So, it's usually quite pointless to adopt a foreign culture's festival if you're not celebrating what the festival was originally meant to commemorate.

(You'd otherwise get soulless, commercialised holidays like Christmas, Halloween and Valentine's Day.)

It's not about how "old" or "pretty" a festival looks whenever it's celebrated, but rather about what the festival symbolises for a community. You Americans, for example, have Thanksgiving, a holiday that has special meaning for you, but which is totally meaningless for everyone else in the world.
There is so much doom and gloom all over the place and I think festivals would be a good way to increase cultural awareness and people's moral. People may see Christmas, Halloween, and Valentine's Day as commercialised holidays that shouldn't be celebrated, but I see value in those holidays. If your with family and friends just think about the celebration aspect of it instead of all the gifts and presents. Seeing people smile even in Valentine's Day sure has its positives, and I get to see some funny Youtube videos, skits, and shows in those holidays.
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Old 2010-12-19, 21:48   Link #1639
Sumeragi
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I think we should celebrate more festivals like they do in Japan here in the United States.
I think the US has enough festivals as is.
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Old 2010-12-19, 22:05   Link #1640
Knightrunner
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I think the US has enough festivals as is.
Why do you think that? Most countries have great vacation and sick time while we work ourselves to death here. Any reason not to increase festivals?
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