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Old 2011-03-17, 02:32   Link #1181
GundamFan0083
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Stage Seven: CODE is up for Code Geass: Alpha and Omega.


In this Stage: "The Irregulars learn more about Nibiru, Nunnally gets a snuggie named Jason, the Yamato no Orochi learn about Akira's new accessory, Gilgamesh and Enkidu go hiking, and Ishtar has a 'threesome' with Lelouch and CC."

http://www.nexusarcana.com/forums/sh...dited-version)

Hope you all enjoy it and thanks for reading


Sorry for the long delay.
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Old 2011-03-23, 22:50   Link #1182
Cal-Reflector
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From the Author of "Lelouch of Britannia"

Long time no see! Graduation, the Bar Exam, and the barren job market looms on the horizon like a dark cloud. As they say: Real Life Cometh. All these have been impediment to my keeping the story moving.

With that in mind, I wanted to get you the readers' thoughts on some things:

I have been encouraged to pitch "Lelouch of Britannia" to the folks at Namco-Bandai. Namco-Bandai owns Sunrise, and Sunrise owns Code Geass. In America, there have been instances where a fanfic author pitches their story to the makers of the original game/series (the "Creators") and get permission to publish and sell their stories. Alternatively, the Creators solicit ideas and submissions from the public, choose the ones they like, and publish them officially. I've been told this is how DC and Marvel produce new content for some of their venerable franchises. This is also, proximately, how the Japanese manga publishing industry work, except there the submissions are original ideas.

My understanding is that Japanese Creators are generally tolerant of fanworks (doujin at Comiket, fanart on Pixiv, fanfic here on fanfiction.net...). However, I know of no instance where an Anime Studio (and the Corporate Overlords who own those studios) accepted a spinoff produced by a fan and commercialized it. There are many possible reasons for this, but the most important one is probably this: commercializing an idea costs them money. There are lots of ideas but not a lot of money.

So how do I convince Bandai that "Lelouch of Britannia" could work?

This seems tricky. I can imagine the conversation:

Cal: "I got this great story for you guys. Fans love it so far! I bet if you make it into a show it will sell like iPods!"

Bandai: "Or they'll just download it off Bittorrent as we spend $5 Million dollars making the show."

Cal: "But, but..."

Bandai: "Besides, this story is too American. Viewers in Japan--the people who buy our blu-rays--won't appreciate it."


The talk could go the same way if I asked them to turn "Lelouch of Britannia" into a game, manga, or figure series. In all cases, it would cost Bandai money. In all cases they would have no idea whether people would pay to see/read "Lelouch of Britannia."

Alternatively, I could ask Bandai to give me permission to publish and sell "Lelouch of Britannia." Perhaps as a book, an ebook, a web-serial, whatever. But then it would cost ME money and I have no idea whether people would pay to read "Lelouch of Britannia." My guess is not many, and I understand why. These days, we're accustomed (including me) to entertainment being free: Scanlations, fansubs, bittorrent, Hulu, Crunchyroll, and of course fanfiction.net have spoiled us. We might put up with banners and ads, but for us to pay money we have to REALLY love the product.

So maybe the best I can hope for is to put "Lelouch of Britannia" on an ad-supported website with a paypal collection box and pray that Bandai doesn't sue me. That sounds awful, and I'm getting depressed just thinking about it.

So back to my earlier ideas. Suppose I try Bandai again, presenting facts which suggest that "Lelouch of Britannia" might not be an epic fail if brought to the North American market in some form: Over 700,000 hits, averaging 20,000 hit per chapter, nearly 1500 subscribers; strong reception and interest from fans after more than two years; translated to Korean and offers to translate into French; even turned into an audiobook by one particularly talented reader.

My ultimate dream is that "Lelouch of Britannia" will become an anime. With the cost of producing anime, I know that's unlikely. But perhaps as a result of you the readers' embrace of this story, I might persuade Bandai to turn "Lelouch of Britannia" into a light novel (or ebook) under an arrangement that will help me recoup my law school tuition.

What do you think?
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Old 2011-03-23, 23:13   Link #1183
GundamFan0083
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First off, nice to have you back Cal.

Contact Namco Bandai Holdings USA Cal and inquire about an AU novel (or manga if you can afford it).
Your story is certainly worth trying to get published as a novel or manga, assuming the Japanese aren't too stuffy about this.

Also:

Are you friggin serious?

Quote:
Over 700,000 hits, averaging 20,000 hit per chapter, nearly 1500 subscribers
I have only a third of that with DoD...dude you suck.
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Old 2011-03-23, 23:23   Link #1184
Cal-Reflector
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GundamFan0083 View Post
Contact Namco Bandai Holdings USA Cal and inquire about an AU novel (or manga if you can afford it).
Your story is certainly worth trying to get published as a novel or manga, assuming the Japanese aren't too stuffy about this.
I know, can't hurt to try right? But if I get one shot at this I want it to be my best shot. Pitching the idea to them, that is. Especially since people are used to having it free.

That wouldn't be a problem if I were still in high school, except now I'm at the point in life where I really have to start clothing and feeding myself.


In a perfect world, I could get all my readers (including the ones who don't review) to put their name on a petition that says something like:

"We fans of the American Code Geass fandom do solemnly pledge that if Lelouch of Britannia gets turned into an anime, we will pre-order limited edition Blu-Ray DVDs plus the figures that come with them. Signed: Ten Thousand Anons."

Maybe some people have some out of the box ideas? I know with web-serials and ebooks these days the game is changing all the time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GundamFan0083 View Post
Are you friggin serious?
Yeah, and I haven't updated since last July.

It's a lot luck too. I wrote 40+ fanfics and even though some of those were very good, only this one was a hit. Just shows I don't know what people want.
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Old 2011-03-23, 23:39   Link #1185
GundamFan0083
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Sorry for the delay in my response.
I was looking for who published Nightmare of Nunnally in the USA.
I couldn't find them online.

Word to the wise.
Don't show them the material, or tell them were they can view it.

Otherwise, they'll take your idea right out from under you.

If you're going to pitch them this, do so with a hook.
Promises of fans pre-ordering will not impress them.
Unless they're significantly different than publishers of science-fiction.
DAW, TOR, and other American publishing houses don't want to see anything other than a brief cover letter of what the story is about, and why you think it will make them money.

I've been down that road, and it is very nerve-racking and irritating.
Especially if they really want your idea.

I don't know very much about pitching to an anime house, or to a Japanese company period.
Therefore, I can only tell you what I know.
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Old 2011-03-23, 23:53   Link #1186
Cal-Reflector
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GundamFan0083 View Post
Sorry for the delay in my response.
I was looking for who published Nightmare of Nunnally in the USA.
I couldn't find them online.

Word to the wise.
Don't show them the material, or tell them were they can view it.

Otherwise, they'll take your idea right out from under you.

If you're going to pitch them this, do so with a hook.
Promises of fans pre-ordering will not impress them.
Unless they're significantly different than publishers of science-fiction.
DAW, TOR, and other American publishing houses don't want to see anything other than a brief cover letter of what the story is about, and why you think it will make them money.

I've been down that road, and it is very nerve-racking and irritating.
Especially if they really want your idea.

I don't know very much about pitching to an anime house, or to a Japanese company period.
Therefore, I can only tell you what I know.
Wow, thanks for sharing this! I'm a complete novice at pitching my stuff.

Technically Bandai owns Code Geass and all derivative works based off it; if they want to take my idea its theirs. I can't complain.

Bandai may be different from American publishers: they're a multinational media conglomerate, with their traditional market in Japan but seeking to expand overseas. I think Anime Producers are not used to selling to American consumers: We're quite different from the Japanese. They're the same however in the most important respect: They want profit with minimal risk.

I could pitch on: the merits of the story, the relatively low business risk to Bandai, the story's targeted appeal to the large English-speaking fandom (more people speak English than Japanese, after all), and the goodwill it would create.
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Old 2011-03-24, 00:04   Link #1187
GundamFan0083
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal-Reflector View Post
I know, can't hurt to try right? But if I get one shot at this I want it to be my best shot. Pitching the idea to them, that is. Especially since people are used to having it free.

That wouldn't be a problem if I were still in high school, except now I'm at the point in life where I really have to start clothing and feeding myself.


In a perfect world, I could get all my readers (including the ones who don't review) to put their name on a petition that says something like:

"We fans of the American Code Geass fandom do solemnly pledge that if Lelouch of Britannia gets turned into an anime, we will pre-order limited edition Blu-Ray DVDs plus the figures that come with them. Signed: Ten Thousand Anons."

Maybe some people have some out of the box ideas? I know with web-serials and ebooks these days the game is changing all the time.



Yeah, and I haven't updated since last July.

It's a lot luck too. I wrote 40+ fanfics and even though some of those were very good, only this one was a hit. Just shows I don't know what people want.
IMHO, petitions isn't exactly going to get Bandai interested.
They're going to want to test this story in one of the cheaper (to produce) media types first.
That's why I mentioned manga or a novel.
Keep in mind that when Okouchi pitched Code Geass to Sunrise, he was already well known in the anime industry and working for Bandai.
Code Geass is unusual in that a new series idea usually becomes a manga first, then goes on to be a new anime after it has proven itself as a manga or novel series.
Same thing with many movies here in the states.
Bandai is going to want to see a business plan that they can turn a profit on, and that means a sales pitch.

Something like this (use DoD so as not to offend you):

"Seven years have passed since Zero Requiem.
All is not well in the world Lelouch has left behind.
An uneasy peace hangs over the UFN as it struggles to meet the energy needs of its people.
An expedition to Antartica, lead by Schniezel el Britannia, unlocks a long forgotten secret within the depths of an ancient city.
A secret which could threaten the existence of mankind itself."

That's a basic hook.
After that I would go on to explain the page length, primary characters, short plot synopsis, and total number of issues/chapters of the work.

I would then go on to mention the popularity, but not too much because you might give the impression that everyone who wanted to read this already has.

Businesses are looking for the next big money maker.
A story which has already been shown to the world, may not make much money.
Then again, it may.
It all depends on the media form the story takes.
In the case of your Lelouch of Britannia, I think an alternate universe manga would make for the best media.
But that's just my opinion.
Bandai may see it very differently.
That's why you've got to ask them first, but only with the initial contact letter.
Don't "throw" this story at them or they'll think your desperate and try and screw you.
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Old 2011-03-24, 00:15   Link #1188
Cal-Reflector
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Thanks for all this! I hesitate even to suggest a manga, because that would involve Bandai having to pay someone to draw my story, in addition to paying me... I hope.

Re: Worry that readers have already read it all:

I suppose I lucked out due to my slow updating, only 1/3 to 1/4 of the story is complete, with plenty room to change.

So I should not volunteer to show them the story. Do you think I should at least tell them that I've written some of it already and people who read it really liked it?
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Old 2011-03-24, 00:28   Link #1189
GundamFan0083
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal-Reflector View Post
Thanks for all this! I hesitate even to suggest a manga, because that would involve Bandai having to pay someone to draw my story, in addition to paying me... I hope.

Re: Worry that readers have already read it all:

I suppose I lucked out due to my slow updating, only 1/3 to 1/4 of the story is complete, with plenty room to change.

So I should not volunteer to show them the story. Do you think I should at least tell them that I've written some of it already and people who read it really liked it?
Don't be too hesitant with them.
In business, your partner wants to know whether you're a push-over, a professional, or a jerk.
You of course wish to come off as professional.'
That means you have to know what you want out of this.
Normally, in the publishing world, the author will sign a contract for publishing rights of 3-5 years and get a royalty of between 12 and 20% profit (not total sales, just the profit after all expenses are paid).
This case is different because Bandai owns Code Geass, but they DON'T own your story about Code Geass.
While this may give them more heckling room, it still provides you with enough room to iron out a modest contractual agreement.
Exclusive rights don't come into play here since Sunrise already owns Code Geass and you'd technically be creating a derivative work of Code Geass.

While it is illegal for me to give you legal advice on this, I can point you in the right direction.
Start with the link I gave you and read the copyright information about derivative works and works for hire.
Japan based its copyright laws on those of the USA and is apart of the Bernes Treaty on protection of intellectual rights.

The most important thing for you to do if you are serious about this is to educate yourself on the laws involved.
This way you can pitch your idea with a clear understanding of what you can expect (or should expect) Bandai to offer you.
It also allows you to get a good idea of what is and is not a decent proposal from Bandai should they decide your idea is profitable.

I know this is a long winded post, and some of it is probably not what you want to read, but it's how the US publishing industry works so it's the only thing I've got to go on.
Bandai may do things differently.
If you know a lawyer, you may want to discuss this with them before you contact Bandai.
I say this more to protect you than anything else.
Large corporations are NOT our friends, no matter how much we like their products.
They live by one mantra: "Increase Profits, reduce cost."
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Old 2011-03-24, 01:44   Link #1190
Cal-Reflector
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GundamFan0083 View Post
Don't be too hesitant with them.
In business, your partner wants to know whether you're a push-over, a professional, or a jerk.
You of course wish to come off as professional.'
That means you have to know what you want out of this.
Normally, in the publishing world, the author will sign a contract for publishing rights of 3-5 years and get a royalty of between 12 and 20% profit (not total sales, just the profit after all expenses are paid).
This case is different because Bandai owns Code Geass, but they DON'T own your story about Code Geass.
While this may give them more heckling room, it still provides you with enough room to iron out a modest contractual agreement.
Exclusive rights don't come into play here since Sunrise already owns Code Geass and you'd technically be creating a derivative work of Code Geass.

While it is illegal for me to give you legal advice on this, I can point you in the right direction.
Start with the link I gave you and read the copyright information about derivative works and works for hire.
Japan based its copyright laws on those of the USA and is apart of the Bernes Treaty on protection of intellectual rights.

The most important thing for you to do if you are serious about this is to educate yourself on the laws involved.
This way you can pitch your idea with a clear understanding of what you can expect (or should expect) Bandai to offer you.
It also allows you to get a good idea of what is and is not a decent proposal from Bandai should they decide your idea is profitable.

I know this is a long winded post, and some of it is probably not what you want to read, but it's how the US publishing industry works so it's the only thing I've got to go on.
Bandai may do things differently.
If you know a lawyer, you may want to discuss this with them before you contact Bandai.
I say this more to protect you than anything else.
Large corporations are NOT our friends, no matter how much we like their products.
They live by one mantra: "Increase Profits, reduce cost."
Again, I'm grateful for all the information. So... Bandai DOESN'T own my fanfic story, to the extent that my story is unique/different from Code Geass, the underlying copyrighted work.

So contractually I'd approach them to: 1 contract me to write for them, in which case I'd be an independent contractor, or 2 Hire me as an employee, in which case my writing would belong them as a work for hire.

Don't worry, there's no way a reasonable person could think an attorney client relationship exists, or that you're practicing law, and I don't subjectively think you're my lawyer either.
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Old 2011-03-24, 07:25   Link #1191
Bonzo
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Consider it, Banpresto know very well my comic and contacted me too.

But just to tell me I can do what I want if I do it for free.
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Old 2011-03-24, 10:21   Link #1192
Cal-Reflector
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Consider it, Banpresto know very well my comic and contacted me too.

But just to tell me I can do what I want if I do it for free.
Wow, that must've been flattering, and a bit scary as well.

Could you tell me a bit more about what exactly they told you? Or how they found you?
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Old 2011-03-24, 10:38   Link #1193
GundamFan0083
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal-Reflector View Post
Again, I'm grateful for all the information. So... Bandai DOESN'T own my fanfic story, to the extent that my story is unique/different from Code Geass, the underlying copyrighted work.

So contractually I'd approach them to: 1 contract me to write for them, in which case I'd be an independent contractor, or 2 Hire me as an employee, in which case my writing would belong them as a work for hire.

Don't worry, there's no way a reasonable person could think an attorney client relationship exists, or that you're practicing law, and I don't subjectively think you're my lawyer either.
You are most welcome Cal.
Your story is excellent IMHO, and I don't even mean the Code Geass elements.
I mean the overall plot about a prince whose lost his memory and now fights for the very Empire he swore to destroy.

When you approach Bandai, you will certainly be approaching them as an independent writer who wishes to publish a derivative work of their intellectual property.
If they're interested, then they'll pitch what kind of gig they're willing to accept back at you, and then you have to decide if that's what you want.

In the event that Bandai is not interested in this work.
You could always change the character names, mecha names, and use psionics instead of Geass.
That way you'd own this story completely, and you could then pitch it to an American Sci-Fi publisher.

DAW is always looking for new submissions.
http://us.penguingroup.com/static/pa...bmissions.html

But again, I must warn you about Penguin, they openly admit that if they like your idea, but not your story, they'll steal it.

Quote:
Neither the corporation nor its imprints assume responsibility for any unsolicited manuscripts which we may receive. As such, it is recommended that sole original copies of any manuscript not be submitted, as the corporation is not responsible for the return of any manuscript (whether sent electronically or by mail), nor do we guarantee a response. Further, in receiving a submission, we do not assume any duty not to publish a book based on a similar idea, concept or story.
So be very careful and always copyright your work with an unpublished copyright before you submit it (if you're going to change this Code Geass story into your own thing).
It's 35 bucks, can be done online in about an hour, and is easy.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot.
Some companies require you to have a professional agent represent you (this is how many publishers are, I don't know about anime companies) for initial contact and negotiations.
I cannot speak for Bandai, but I mention this so that you're not taken off guard if they do want that from you.

@bonzo:
Your work is equally good.
Bonzo, I know I have no right to say this, but you should really consider making your own manga and pitching it to a manga company like Kadokawa or Shounen Jump.

You and Cal are both very talented gentleman, and should consider trying to profit off those talents.

Just be careful of the scammers and cutthroats because they're all over the publishing industry.

Here's a good online resourse for both of you to check out.

Publisher's weekly:
http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/home/index.html

I use them as a good guide myself.
Many of their articles are very useful.
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Old 2011-03-24, 11:31   Link #1194
Bonzo
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Well, in Italy try to make a comic is....dangerous.

Too much risk to see your ideas stolen, because the pro comic designer are...hungry of ideas.

Sunrise close a eye if you make a comic with their licenses, if is for free, for a hobby and then no profit.

I make alternative ending for manga/anime under license for a well...perfidious plan, thanks the fact more italian comic designer steal every thing they see, if they steal what I draw, they will be "killed" by sunrise or other copyright house, instead I'm in a iron barrel.
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Old 2011-03-24, 11:56   Link #1195
Cal-Reflector
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Quote:
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Well, in Italy try to make a comic is....dangerous.

Too much risk to see your ideas stolen, because the pro comic designer are...hungry of ideas.

Sunrise close a eye if you make a comic with their licenses, if is for free, for a hobby and then no profit.

I make alternative ending for manga/anime under license for a well...perfidious plan, thanks the fact more italian comic designer steal every thing they see, if they steal what I draw, they will be "killed" by sunrise or other copyright house, instead I'm in a iron barrel.
Damn, that sounds like terrible. No doubt professional artists, illustrators, and even writers prawl fanworks for ideas and designs to copy. But that can't be helped, after all, it's complicated when what we make is based off what we did not create/own to begin with.

So it's important I guess, even when working on something original, not to share it with too many people.

Can you link me to some of your works? I'm curious, and no, I'm not a Italian professional comic designer. So don't worry.
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Old 2011-03-24, 13:10   Link #1196
Bonzo
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Here:

http://forums.animesuki.com/showthread.php?t=75163
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Old 2011-03-24, 20:55   Link #1197
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Cal, I for one am in favor of you persueing this idea! I have followed all of the fanfics here on AS (especially Bonzos') and if you are any of the others works were put to anime or manga I'd BUY IT in a heart beat! I say go for it, but heed Gundamfan0083s warnings!
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Old 2011-04-01, 03:31   Link #1198
Revan sama
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I made a new fanfiction about lost colors.
Title: Love time reversed.
Pairing: Rai x Nunnally as children.
summary: A serie of One-shots about Rai x Nunnally as children. (Nunnally is five year old and Rai is eight year old at the beginning.)

http://www.fanfiction.net/s/6862329/..._Time_reversed
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Old 2011-04-08, 02:53   Link #1199
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Chapter six of 'Love time reversed' is done.

Chapter six: A small acknowledgment is born
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Old 2011-04-13, 13:07   Link #1200
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Chapter seven of 'love time reversed' is done.
http://www.fanfiction.net/s/6862329/..._Time_reversed
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