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Old 2011-08-29, 13:35   Link #5061
monster
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In English, if you end a sentence with an initial, do you still put an extra dot for the period?
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Old 2011-08-29, 21:03   Link #5062
Masuzu
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^ I never thought about that, wouldn't it be redundant?

I suppose it would.
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Old 2011-08-30, 01:48   Link #5063
felix
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Technically it wouldn’t. However I find the whole putting of periods after letters redundant especially for abbreviations that are meant to be read as words.
Quote:
Originally Posted by monster View Post
In English, if you end a sentence with an initial, do you still put an extra dot for the period?
Don't think that happens all that often—if ever. Also in birtish english usually you don’t place periods after the letters, if I’m not mistaken. So it’s just something like: “fox123O is a GIRL.”
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Old 2011-08-30, 01:49   Link #5064
TinyRedLeaf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monster View Post
In English, if you end a sentence with an initial, do you still put an extra dot for the period?
Such cases rarely occur, if at all. I would imagine "no", you don't put an extra dot before the full stop, purely for aesthetic reasons rather than grammar (in other words, it's mainly a publication housestyle/design choice). A better solution would be to recast the sentence to avoid ending it with an initial.

Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post
Technically it wouldn’t. However I find the whole putting of periods after letters redundant especially for abbreviations that are meant to be read as words.
Technically, those would be acronyms rather than abbreviations. Again, it would be a design choice on the publication's part as to whether to dot the short forms or not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post
Also in birtish english usually you don’t place periods after the letters, if I’m not mistaken. So it’s just something like: “fox123O is a GIRL.”
Not sure about that. Take J. K. Rowling and J. R. R. Tolkien, for example.
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Old 2011-08-30, 03:43   Link #5065
monster
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Just to clarify, I'm more exposed to American English. I didn't bother specifying earlier since I wasn't (and am still not) sure if that would make any difference.

With that said, thanks for answering, you guys.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
A better solution would be to recast the sentence to avoid ending it with an initial.
That does seem to be the safest option since I'm just so used to putting all the dots unless it's an acronym, and sometimes even then.
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Old 2011-09-01, 08:25   Link #5066
econzz
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ah I had a question...might be a little silly tho.. please don't laugh at me >,<

what is the difference between yukata and kimono?
and on what occasion do people wear yukata and kimono?
and is there kimono for men? or yukata for girl?

just wondering tho. sorry if anyone hv already discuss on this.
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Old 2011-09-01, 08:55   Link #5067
Kylaran
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Quote:
Originally Posted by econzz View Post
ah I had a question...might be a little silly tho.. please don't laugh at me >,<

what is the difference between yukata and kimono?
and on what occasion do people wear yukata and kimono?
and is there kimono for men? or yukata for girl?

just wondering tho. sorry if anyone hv already discuss on this.
The word kimono (着物) in Japanese means "thing that is worn," and can be translated in a larger sense simply as clothing (prior to the introduction of Western clothes). Thus, a yukata (浴衣) is a subset of kimono that is designed for summer that is lighter than the more expensive silk kimono that are quite warm during cold Japanese winters. Traditionally it served as summer clothing, and as its name implies, as the sort of clothes you wear after a bath. Yukata can be worn by men and women, though of course the design would be different.

Wikipedia can go into detail more:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yukata

You'll see girls don yukata often in the summer, particularly if you have the chance to go to a fireworks display (they're really crowded though...), so by consequence foreigners who watch anime have come to be familiar with the yukata as a representative of kimono, when in fact there are many many different kinds.

On another note, sometimes you may see girls will wear beautiful kimonos (not yukata) on some traditional holidays; kimonos are also frequent during Coming of Age Day (成人の日).
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Old 2011-09-03, 02:28   Link #5068
Kudryavka
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What's the male counterpart to a "waifu"? I know that literally it would be a "hasubando," but I've never seen that term used by someone else in the context of a waifu before. So is there an existing term? Bishie? Hunk? BF?
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Old 2011-09-03, 02:36   Link #5069
felix
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You understand "waifu" is not actually a word itself, yes?
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Old 2011-09-03, 04:27   Link #5070
Kudryavka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post
You understand "waifu" is not actually a word itself, yes?
I know that it's not a real word, but it is an Internet word (no better name for it, sorry) that has a somewhat widely known connotation - or at least, mai waifu does. I'm wondering if there's a similar word for a guy character I like, or w/e.
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Old 2011-09-03, 09:39   Link #5071
risingstar3110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komari View Post
What's the male counterpart to a "waifu"? I know that literally it would be a "hasubando," but I've never seen that term used by someone else in the context of a waifu before. So is there an existing term? Bishie? Hunk? BF?
How's about "hubby"?

As what i saw, that's what fangirls use in situation when guys will likely to use "waifu"...
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Old 2011-09-03, 11:34   Link #5072
Kudryavka
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Originally Posted by risingstar3110 View Post
How's about "hubby"?

As what i saw, that's what fangirls use in situation when guys will likely to use "waifu"...
OK, thank you!
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Old 2011-09-04, 07:11   Link #5073
CupidKirby
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Chibi Maruko-chan English dub?

Is it true that Chibi Maruko-chan has an English dub that aired on Animax in Asia?
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Old 2011-09-04, 23:44   Link #5074
SoloPanda
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I've been looking for a baka to testo light novel thread here but can't seem to find it is there one? and if there is could someone show me where i can find it please?
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Old 2011-09-05, 00:38   Link #5075
Kudryavka
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Originally Posted by SoloPanda View Post
I've been looking for a baka to testo light novel thread here but can't seem to find it is there one? and if there is could someone show me where i can find it please?
Hm, doesn't seem to be one. In that case, should be fine to make the thread yourself in the Manga and Light Novels section.

For future reference, you can use the Search feature on the forums to pick out threads yourself.
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Old 2011-09-05, 05:43   Link #5076
SoloPanda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komari View Post
Hm, doesn't seem to be one. In that case, should be fine to make the thread yourself in the Manga and Light Novels section.

For future reference, you can use the Search feature on the forums to pick out threads yourself.
Thank you very much i'll try making one and seeing if there is any interest in it.
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Old 2011-09-05, 13:14   Link #5077
Solafighter
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In this forum, in the "General Chat", wasnt there a thread about traveling to Japan? Cant find it anymore.


EDIT:
Found it.
Heck, the last post was in May..
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Old 2011-09-07, 01:23   Link #5078
Kameruka
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Is there any other language(s) where "brother" and "husband" in same word?

In Malay "abang" literally mean "brother" but it also can be used for husband as well, like "hubby" in (American) English. I can't imagine Kirino and Sora calling their brothers as "abang".
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Old 2011-09-07, 02:13   Link #5079
Irenicus
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Not exact, but in Korean "oppa" is used for an older male sibling or someone who is viewed as an equivalent of an older male sibling; it is also used by women to call their boyfriends/husbands/lovers.
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Old 2011-09-07, 07:19   Link #5080
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irenicus View Post
Not exact, but in Korean "oppa" is used for an older male sibling or someone who is viewed as an equivalent of an older male sibling; it is also used by women to call their boyfriends/husbands/lovers.
Some girls call their husbands "boss". I heard it from my friends' once - the wife was telling the child to get permission from his dad.

Interestingly, adding an "i" at the end of the romanised phonetic and you get - *IS SHOT*.
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