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Old 2004-11-24, 17:23   Link #21
TronDD
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In America, at least, if someone breaks into your house and tries to steal your property, you can kill them stone dead right there.

When a company tries anything to protect it's property, all of a sudden it's this big evil "monopoly" and how dare they do that.

An the other hand, one cannot defend their home with an automatic lethal force system. Such as the classic shotgun with the trigger tied to the door knob. It assumes guilt right off the bat. The RIAA often attemps to pass laws that can result in noncriminals being treated as such. I don't stand for that.
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Old 2004-11-25, 06:44   Link #22
Umbrae
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TronDD
In America, at least, if someone breaks into your house and tries to steal your property, you can kill them stone dead right there.

When a company tries anything to protect it's property, all of a sudden it's this big evil "monopoly" and how dare they do that.

Yes but when some one breaks into my house and steals my TV for example. I no longer have it. I cannot watch my DVD's, or even cable, because my TV is gone. When I download somthing off the internet, I did not take it, I made a copy of it. Honestly, if some one breaks into my house, looks at my TV, goes home and makes a new one. As long as they did not damage my house breaking into it, I do not care. Huge differance.
Never once through downloading music off the internet have I deprived the music industries of somthing they had before.


Quote:
Originally Posted by STfan
It seems to be a fad to hate on the RIAA.
Yea just like breathing is popular this season. Hating the RIAA is not a new fassion. I have hated the recording industry long before the current problems with downloading music. I hated them for sucking up most of the profits that I thought should go to the band that I belived I was suporting by purchasing a CD. If I had known when I was younger that by buying a CD I would help launch britany spears carrier I may not have.
Bands make most thier money of touring currently. The record sales are still a percentage, but not the main source. considering the price of mass production and shipping, that means most of what you pay for, is the company. You are giving more $ to the company that signs bands into often restritive contracts that stifle creativity. Worse yet, you have no choice but to do so or become a dreaded pirate.

I myself currently am banning the RIAA, and shall start doing so for the MPAA as well. If they want to try and beat me with a stick that says law, I will beat back with a stick that says freedom. Odd when thier right to pursue happiness via taking my money is met with an alternitive that I have in pursute of happiness via music.

Also, they honestly cannot prove that the people they are busting for downloading music are doing so illegaly. For example, if I buy 15 CD's. Then my 5 year old gets a hold of them, and uses them as shoes scratching them to a point beyond repair. I am within my leagle right to make and use a backup copy of them. If I need to download that backup copy for a network, who is to stop me? what law have I violated? I downloaded music that I have a leagle copywright to. . . only it was in another form. Thus, I am restricted from copying my property to another media? Not if it is my proporty. that is one of the reasons I purchase somthing. So I can do with it as I please.

And yes, a large portion of what I download is replacement of music I have perviously owned. if and when the RIAA and MPAA give me an unristricted method to replace any lost or damaged goods I will end my boycott, but not till then.
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Old 2004-11-25, 09:21   Link #23
Lord Raiden
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The funny part about what you just said is that the RIAA and MPAA are slowly but surely making it easier and easier to boycott them. In just this year alone I've only seen 3 movies that I actually liked. "I, Robot", Spiderman 2, and The Incredibles. Aside from that everything else has been a steaming pile of fecal matter. If the movie industry keeps this up and the Indy films keep getting better then ignoring or boycotting the MPAA will be a sinch. Heck, last year in 2003 the only two good films all year was Return of the King and Triplets of Belleville, which was a french indy film, but an excellent one none the less.

And I'm not even going to go into all the garbase spewing out of the halls of Riaa last year. Eww. That stuff was utterly horrible. Recycled, talentless gutter noise in my book. There was better stuff that came out of Europe, Asia, and other countries overseas plus the local indy bands. I'm not a huge fan of indy music, but there's a lot more good indy groups than good riaa sponsored groups. And someone please sew britney's mouth shut. Gah. She's annoying.
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Old 2004-11-26, 19:40   Link #24
ChibiDusk
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Is Canada still safe on this? Is it still legal to dl music and movies, fairuse, and all that?
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Old 2004-11-26, 19:50   Link #25
Mr_Paper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChibiDusk
Is Canada still safe on this? Is it still legal to dl music and movies, fairuse, and all that?
Umm... Actually, it's still, just as its always been, illegal to download music and movies files in Canada.

My curiousity over the bill is because Paul Martin, being the balless bastard he's always been, has this stupid habit of trying to follow the American lead.
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Old 2004-11-26, 21:24   Link #26
Yamano667
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My advice to everyone on this forum DO IT AND DONT TELL

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Paper
Umm... Actually, it's still, just as its always been, illegal to download music and movies files in Canada.

My curiousity over the bill is because Paul Martin, being the balless bastard he's always been, has this stupid habit of trying to follow the American lead.
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Old 2004-11-26, 21:54   Link #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yamano667
My advice to everyone on this forum DO IT AND DONT TELL
We could operate a don't ask/don't tell policy...

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Old 2004-11-26, 23:33   Link #28
tanuki
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Sorry, duplicate post. Message reply upload to forum froze.
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Old 2004-11-26, 23:33   Link #29
tanuki
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TronDD
In America, at least, if someone breaks into your house and tries to steal your property, you can kill them stone dead right there.
Justifiable homicide usually won't apply if, for instance, the burglar was unarmed and when confronted by the homeowner the burglar turned and tried to run from the scene when the homeowner shot him in the back and killed him. Use of deadly force normally is allowed when the homeowner believed that the burglar posed an immediate danger to the life of the homeowner (or to the lives of others in the home at the time). Which points to why lethal traps like spring loaded knives and shotguns wired to doors for security are against the law. The state can choose to can execute convicted criminals for crimes against persons, but the death penalty is never imposed for strictly property crimes. So the reasoning follows...why should a citizen believe they have the power to execute someone for a crime that the state would only impose prison time for?

Quote:
When a company tries anything to protect it's property, all of a sudden it's this big evil "monopoly" and how dare they do that.
When companies band together in associations their intent is less about using existing laws to protect their property and more about a desire to use their combined political and financial clout to change those laws to better suit their interests. A desire which could go against and infringe upon the interests and existing legal rights of everyday citizens. From the outside it looks like a political action lobby group formed by companies who want to mold the laws to their liking and then use the authority of the criminal justice system to enfore those new laws. All without getting the hands of the individual companies involved in the associations dirty. Rather than MGM, or Paramount, or any specific company being mentioned negatively in the news and possibly seen in the eyes of the public as the "bad guy", the MPAA association shell is instead named and seen as the villian.

Quote:
An the other hand, one cannot defend their home with an automatic lethal force system. Such as the classic shotgun with the trigger tied to the door knob. It assumes guilt right off the bat. The RIAA often attempts to pass laws that can result in noncriminals being treated as such. I don't stand for that.
The associations like to whip out estimates to establish that copyright infringement produces billions in alledged actual monetary loss for the companies involved each year. All in an attempt to justify that copyright infringement of such a magnitude should be considered as theft and punishable as a crime. But I think if the world were to suddenly become copyright infringement free, those companies wouldn't suddenly be making all those billions more per year. Because entertainment isn't the necessity they they make it out to be. People can't live without food, but they can live without listening to the latest Britney Spears single.

Last edited by tanuki; 2004-11-27 at 03:51.
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Old 2004-11-27, 00:04   Link #30
Lord Raiden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Paper
Umm... Actually, it's still, just as its always been, illegal to download music and movies files in Canada.

My curiousity over the bill is because Paul Martin, being the balless bastard he's always been, has this stupid habit of trying to follow the American lead.
I wish to contest this. I've got 3 different friends on another forum who said that it is legal to download music in canada. It's just illegal to UPLOAD it. Kind of a catch 22 really. You can download it, but you can't share it with anyone, so if nobody can upload it legally, then nobody can download it either. But either way people still upload music and people still download music. Now movies on the other hand are illegal to trade period. Music is the only thing legal to download for free on the internet in canada when it comes to licenced media.
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Old 2004-11-27, 02:46   Link #31
Mr_Paper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Raiden
Music is the only thing legal to download for free on the internet in canada when it comes to licenced media.
Music from registered/certified sites (aka. pay-per-download sites like Easy Tracks) are the only legal music downloads that I know of. On the other hand, our goverment knows that they can't stop people from downloading music which is why we pay a tax, which supposedly goes to the music industry, on all recordable media like CD-R/Ws.
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Old 2004-11-27, 09:36   Link #32
Lord Raiden
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There's a tax on all recordable media here and yet they STILL ban us from downloading music and movies. GO figure. It's like saying "we know you're guilty of stealing, so we'll still make you pay for our music/movies/etc one cd at a time even if you aren't.

Oh well. I guess I don't mind too much because the tax isn't all that big. But if they're going to tax our recordable media, at least let us leach something in return.
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Old 2004-11-27, 14:44   Link #33
STfan
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Except that each mp3 can be analyzed for a particular "signature" and traced. Forensics can reveal if the mp3 you have is a copy of an illegally shared one.

I doubt if people'd go to that much trouble, of using forensics on your computer to prove your guilt, for most music downloaders, so you probably shouldn't worry.

Unless you live in the US.
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