AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > Anime Discussion > Older Series

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2011-11-16, 00:26   Link #501
Sol Falling
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Age: 25
I liked this episode. Content was strong. Actually, while Kanade might serve as our (the audience's) key into the traditional merits of Karuta, I would say that Tsutomu in this episode was even more relatable.

We know that Taichi pretty much got dragged into taking Karuta seriously by Chihaya and Arata. But Tsutomu here is a stranger by any angle. Despite being factually wrong when he loudly assumed there were no professionals in Karuta, truthfully the question he asked, "What merit does Karuta have for me?", still stands in general. A person would not really pick up the game just for supposedly "improving" their memory.

The theme of this episode is self-actualization. What draws Tsutomu to the club this time is not the game itself, but the people who will challenge him to strive towards it. The heart which comes to drive both Tsutomu and Taichi, as self-aware "losers", in contrast to Chihaya and Arata, is desire rather than passion. If, through Karuta, Chihaya's story will be to discover herself, then Tsutomu and Taichi's story will be to be reborn in it.

Regarding character backgrounds, although I'd agree with "ostracized", I would not really categorize Tsutomu's circumstances as "bullying". Socially, out of the rest of the cast, the character I would say Tsutomu was most similar to would be, indeed after all, Kanade, as people who lacked modes of self-expression whereby they could be able to communicate their values to others.

Heh. Between each of the "main characters" introduced thus far (though, again, Chihaya/Taichi/Arata's physical beauty reflects their status as the "main" main characters), there are already many points of comparison and contrast.

Anyway, one character aspect I liked which this episode highlighted is that intelligent people often tend to naturally be very self-limiting. Because they are so focused on the world around them, paradoxically they have a strong tendency to fixate on what they can't do rather than what they actually can. Both Tsutomu and Taichi are like this. In fact, the capacity to avoid failure can engender an overpowering fear of ever experiencing it. One of the things I will look forward to in this series is how throwing themselves into the real life realm of triumph and loss will turn them into genuine human beings.
__________________
Seasonal enjoyment ratings:
Stardust Crusaders 80/5 :: Sailor Moon Crystal 20/5 :: Hanayamata 28/5 :: Locodol 50/5 :: Yama no Susume 100/5 :: Sabagebu 28/5 :: Momo Kyun Sword 11/5
Fall:
Sora no Method 20/5 :: Karen Senki 5/5 :: Cross Ange 1/5 :: Shirobako 22/5 :: Yuuki Yuuna 21/5 :: Mushishi S2 100/5
God-tier yuri oneshot mangaka: Minase Ruruu
Yuri Precure otaku manga: Shinozaki-san ki wo ota shika ni
Best adorable shoujo manga: Last Game
Sol Falling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 00:33   Link #502
thundrakkon
Fly Away into the Night
*Graphic Designer
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: USA
Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
With this episode, I'm starting to wonder if bullying is more common in Japanese high schools than what I had previously suspected (mainly since I don't recall seeing it as commonly in high school-based anime as I see in high school-based North American tv shows). If anybody is "in the know" here, please feel free to share your knowledge on this topic.
I previously brought up how uniformity can lead to bullying. From what I can remember concerning history, I can partially explain the concept of unity. The other concern for bullying has to do with the economic outlook.

After World War II, Japan and its infrastructure was in disarray. Society at that point needed people to do their job, almost like a hive concept, in order to rebuild society. People were expected to accept what duties were assigned to them, and the job they have. They had to conform to social needs of society, and they cannot publicly complain about it, which is an expression of "wa" or social harmony. The expression of wa has been around for a long time. Hence, anything that does not conform to the harmony of society is often rejected.

You can read more on Japan society here: Society

As for bullying in High Schools in Japan, it has to do with conformity. If you stand out, you get bullied. Another of the reasons they give for bullying is that the students themselves do not see much of a future for themselves. The economy is bad, and your chances for great success is low.

Anyway, you can read more about it here: Bullying

Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
Going back to Taichi for a second, I think his decision to move the card was not mean-spirited, but I do think he was aiming for a dominating victory and was aware that this would help his cause there. I didn't see that as particularly unkind, though. Taichi wants to be the toughest opponent that he can be for Chihaya so that he doesn't feel like he's inferior to Arata as a potential training partner for her (the anime briefly delved into Taichi's understandable insecurities here earlier on in the episode). Plus, the guy is human, and so I can't fault him for desiring the sweet, sweet taste of decisive victory.

Particularly against someone who, frankly, has been pwning his ass pretty badly. I think most hot-blooded males in his shoes would want to not only win, but win huge, against somebody that had been beating him as badly as what Chihaya had been beating Taichi. At a certain level, maybe it's good for Chihaya to be made to feel the way Taichi has been feeling, as she certainly hasn't been taking it easy on him, lol.
This, I can agree with you on, and you brought up some good points. It is understandable to desire a sweet victory after getting your ass handed to you so many times.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol Falling View Post
Regarding character backgrounds, although I'd agree with "ostracized", I would not really categorize Tsutomu's circumstances as "bullying".
From the link I provided above, being socially ostracized is considered bullying in Japan. It can lead to students committing suicide.
__________________
thundrakkon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 02:26   Link #503
Sol Falling
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by thundrakkon View Post
I previously brought up how uniformity can lead to bullying. From what I can remember concerning history, I can partially explain the concept of unity. The other concern for bullying has to do with the economic outlook.

After World War II, Japan and its infrastructure was in disarray. Society at that point needed people to do their job, almost like a hive concept, in order to rebuild society. People were expected to accept what duties were assigned to them, and the job they have. They had to conform to social needs of society, and they cannot publicly complain about it, which is an expression of "wa" or social harmony. The expression of wa has been around for a long time. Hence, anything that does not conform to the harmony of society is often rejected.

You can read more on Japan society here: Society

As for bullying in High Schools in Japan, it has to do with conformity. If you stand out, you get bullied. Another of the reasons they give for bullying is that the students themselves do not see much of a future for themselves. The economy is bad, and your chances for great success is low.

Anyway, you can read more about it here: Bullying
lol, let me just put it simply.


Those are neither the words nor the expression of someone who's feeling bullied/remotely suicidal. Yes, bullying exists in Japan and there are structural/societal reasons for it. Yes, Japan's suicide rate is also extremely high due to pressure to perform scholastically. It's true that awareness of that "need" to get ahead economically was part of what Tsutomu used to rationalize/encourage his own alienization. However, the social forces you are referring to have not imposed themselves upon him externally. He's not being bullied, and he's not being put under scholastic pressure. Tsutomu chose to focus on studies and alienate himself from his classmates himself; someone truly being ostracized would've been a thousand times more aware of/grateful for the social refuge the Karuta club offered. Tsutomu is not a victim, and the anime doesn't portray him as one; if anyone could have been said to be showing real conformity to the standards of Japanese society, the one person most clearly doing that in that class was Tsutomu himself.
__________________
Seasonal enjoyment ratings:
Stardust Crusaders 80/5 :: Sailor Moon Crystal 20/5 :: Hanayamata 28/5 :: Locodol 50/5 :: Yama no Susume 100/5 :: Sabagebu 28/5 :: Momo Kyun Sword 11/5
Fall:
Sora no Method 20/5 :: Karen Senki 5/5 :: Cross Ange 1/5 :: Shirobako 22/5 :: Yuuki Yuuna 21/5 :: Mushishi S2 100/5
God-tier yuri oneshot mangaka: Minase Ruruu
Yuri Precure otaku manga: Shinozaki-san ki wo ota shika ni
Best adorable shoujo manga: Last Game
Sol Falling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 03:27   Link #504
Mercurius.H
King of Hg
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
In the rules of Karuta, relocating a card is permitted only if the player promptly announce the move to the opponent. So what Taichi did in this episode is legitimate while in ep1 he was cheating.
__________________
Cuius rei subscriptionem mirabilem sane detexi hanc marginis exiguitas non caperet.

I have discovered a truly remarkable signature which this margin is too small to contain.
Mercurius.H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 03:45   Link #505
Haak
F**k my life...
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: UK
Age: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by thundrakkon View Post
Taichi was very helpful this episode. He almost had a perfectly good episode, until he pulled a fast one on Chihaya. They just can't go an episode without doing something to make you dislike the guy, can they? Even though it was within the rules to do so, Taichi moving the position around the cards in order to further exploit Chihaya's weakness was very "unkind". He already had her beat with his memory, but he wanted to totally wipe her out. He did not need to move the cards in order to win. It is more a reflection of his personality to do whatever it takes to win, so it shows that he has not changed that much since his childhood. Otherwise, the rest of the episode, he was actually good and helped recruit a member for once.
Well yeah, he didn't want to just beat her. He wanted to beat her as much as he possibly could. It's called giving it your all. Why shouldn't he try and win as much as possible? I don't think think Chihaya would've preferred he go easy on her nor do I think Taichi expects Chihaya to go easy on him.
__________________
MyAnimeList
Avatar - Gekkan Shoujo Nozaki-kun
Signature - Gundam Reconguista in G
Haak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 05:11   Link #506
Dawnstorm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Austria
I'm late.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperborealis View Post
Perhaps Chihaya's desire to maintain her past into the present is best understood as a general cultural allegory. By holding onto cultural memories and traditions, the show is saying, we make it possible for all of us to stay together as Japanese today. Or, from an individual point of view: by cherishing my childhood memories and friends (especially those bound up with traditional cultural forms such as karuta), I find a place for myself in the modern world as a distinctively Japanese person. However we account for Chihaya's motives, this is what she is doing, and what the show I think is ultimately about.
I've been thinking about the intersection between tradition and integration since your post (when I had the time; busy week and a head cold made that sort of hard). I do think you're right and tradition in the form of karuta is quite important. There are two basic cultural values that have to be integrated for Japenese society to work: At face value, competition (i.e. dividing society into winners and losers) is at odds with the deap-seated need for harmony (i.e. the fear of embarrassment; the need to belong). A winner can harbour jealousy, and loser can harbour scorn. By staying smack-dab in the middle - i.e. not standing out in the first place - you avoid the risk of both. (Another turnament show, Saki, had the titular character have the talent to always come out +/- zero. Fear of winning is as important here as fear of losing.)

This show plays up both the competition angle, and the belonging angle. Episode 7 has now brought the student ranking (latent in Taichi from the get go) into the spot light. And it has, for the first time, touched upon jealousy. Tsutomu faces Taichi, who blocks his goal of being best with (apparantly) little effort, and he even has friends, and people admiring him. In the face of Taichi, Tsutomu can no longer lie to himself: he's always known that people won't magically like him if he becomes #1 (at whatever).

So, in the end, how do you balance the need to compete (ingrained in public student rankings, for example) with the need to belong? One false step, and people start talking about you rather than with you. What to do? Strive for mediocrity?

Nope, the show gives us outsiders with a clear desire to excell. Of the characters we met so far, only Arata seems to have the desire to excell at karuta (being acquainted with it intimately from very early on). It's a stand in for Chihaya; and it's a training camp for Taichi (winning feels nice, so here I practice actually working for a win). Unsure about Tsutomu, so far. For Kana the competition is (so far) a tangent for her own desire, which is to share the beauty of traditional values.

So karuta, as a game, is basically a "site" where you can practise to reconcile winning with society building: you'll want to win, as that's the nominal point of the game. But you also want the club to succeed, and maybe club members go to national turnaments (and it stops there, because there's little interest in karuta outside of Japan --> best of the world). Basically, you can always displace competition one step upwards: compete within the club, but support each other against opponents from elswhere...

You reconcile competition with belonging, by placing yourself into a context of greater competition upwards in complexity, so even losing you gain a benefit from a "friend" winning. This is why the "best of Japan = best of the word", which sounds incredibly stupid and empty to me personally, makes absolute sense in the context of the show. If that were all, we'd just re-affirm the basic inspirational cliché: if we all do our best, we can be proud of our ("club", "school", "family", "country"). And the dark side of this is the fear of dragging the group down...

Here's where the show balances the tournament system very well with school and family life. Note, for example, that Arata will - in all likelihood - be neither a club member nor a student at that school. He'll be - probably - a tough opponent, but only connected to Taichi/Chihaya, not to the other club members.

I'm probably still not making much sense, as I have to think things through some more. There are plenty cross references I have set my eyes upon. For example: Chihaya joining the "Track-club" to meet people, but then unintentionally blowing off the class mate who invites her has echoes with Kana joining the archery club to be able to wear traditional clothes (and thus not being all that interested in archery, which rubs her team-mates the wrong way). Then look at Kana joining the karuta club with the same motivition, but this time out in the open and with Chihaya's approval (~ "doesn't matter why you like karuta, you like it as I do"). I think that's the direction I'd have to think about tradition <---> integration: as a practise ground for competition as integrational rather than destructive conflict.

Quote:
I expect Chihaya's family to become an object of satire. All their fussing about the sister, all the schoolmates' fascination with the sister's minor celebrityhood, is all going to be upstaged when Chihaya becomes a world-class karuta player. So I don't see the sister as a role model--to the contrary, she is an easy target in the show's critique of modernity.
It's quite possible that they'll go that way, but I'm not yet ready to commit to any direction. However, when I said "role-model", I was talking a bit more literally: I didn't think of a moral paragon to be emulated, but literally someone Chihaya watched when she was small and thus used a model for her role in society (that could go many ways "I want to be like that", "I hope I'm never going to be like that"... Playing karuta with Arata that day has changed the function of the role from "this is someting I'm not," to "this is something I could be". But the general model of success I imagine still comes from her sister as the prime competitive person in her life - modelling is very competitive).

Quote:
When you say that Chihaya, Taichi, and Arata make their friendship "contingent upon karuta," you recognize how very peculiar that is? Should not a real friendship extend itself outwards, to include other aspects of each others' lives? One has to ask: would they even be friends at all without karuta? But let's put it differently: they are not friends due to karuta, but really due to the efforts each of them make to remain connected to each other. Taichi has to make the effort to stay with Chihaya, despite his relative disinterest in the game. Arata has to get over his despair and get on the bike and go chasing the train. And Chihaya has to get on the train to go to Arata's hometown, since she knows if she does not, her friendship with him will be over. Their feelings are genuine, even if the vocabulary in which they express it is restricted to karuta. I suppose we are supposed to understand that the world in miniature exists within karuta, so that if they push deep enough in, they will gather everything in essence everything that is also outside karuta. Karuta is an analogue, not a synecdoche, for life.
Well, Chihaya and Taichi have been friends before karuta. But they're not a "trio" without it. Karuta may be an analogue to the world, but only as far as "Taichi-Chihaya-Arata" is concerned. The club is heading the same way. But karuta in the town's karuta society was not an analogue to the world. It was the world put on hold. This is the extra layer that Chihaya and co. have to break through. Karuta cannot remain a micro cosmos like that, because the show makes it clear that you cannot always play karuta. On that train, Taichi and Chihaya talked about being worried about Arata (he'd not give up karuta out of the blue). When they then met him? There was no language to express that worry; instead karuta almost ruined everything. The fix, then, once again involved Karuta - but Taichi's "We didn't come to see you kick karuta cards," was ambiguous enough to hint at a world outside, and perhaps the transition needed for Arata to "snap out of it".

I don't know how to put this, but from watching anime and Japanese movies, and from some theoretical texts I get the impression that Westerners tend to think of society as Venn diagrams, while Japanese tend to think of society as concentric circles. If that metaphor has any merit, it might make sense to view karuta as a point of growth. You practise living inside karuta until you transcend it. A western solution to a similar problem would involve "expanding your horizon". Notice how that happens, too, but within the context?

It's like... personalities rippling outwards in ever greater circles - and many people with similar problems joining together to make greater ripples. Still thinking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GundamZZ View Post
According to a Japanese women's magazine, there are two types of beauty. The first type do everything right. The second type is called mudabijin, or wasteful beautiful. The second type lacks the maintenance. This statement may be the promotion for manicure. However, it makes a point: Every woman can look beautiful if she spends time to make over.

To her fellow students, and Taichi, she is known as mudabijin. They recognizes her as a nature born beauty, but she's turning them off.
Tank you for that explanation. The subs said "beauty in vain", which sounds pretty unique in English. I didn't get that cultural connection at all. I love learning things like this.

***

@bullying: Depends on your definition of the term, whether ostracisation is bullying or not. There are good reasons for including it, but also reasons for excluding it. I'm sort of exhausted now, so I'm not going into this in detail. But basically, whatever you call it, you have two distinct situations:

A) A specific group of people seeks out an outsider to torment him/her.

vs.

B) A diffuse crowd of people is excluding an outsider and whispering rumours behind his/her back.

I've personally had severe problems with A, but only negligible problems with B). It seems that (B) is one of the recruiting grounds for tormentors (but not the exclusive one). Not sure about the situation in Japan, though. (I'm Austrian - little country in the European Alps next to Switzerland and Germany).
Dawnstorm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 05:11   Link #507
KyriaL
You are Reading this!
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: In the study room
I hope the club will not be a gathering place for 'unique' people. But the OST throughout sounds very motivational, I have to say. However, any game or topic of interest can be used as catalysts for creating and strengthening bonds between friends.
KyriaL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 07:58   Link #508
hai_san
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Taichi get + points for ep 6!

He know he cant never beats Arata but he will still try! Same as for Chihaya, he knows that Arata hold a special place in Chihaya heart but he is still trying to win her because he loves her.
hai_san is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 08:37   Link #509
Kanon
Kana Hanazawa ♥
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: France
Age: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol Falling View Post
lol, let me just put it simply.

Those are neither the words nor the expression of someone who's feeling bullied/remotely suicidal. Yes, bullying exists in Japan and there are structural/societal reasons for it. Yes, Japan's suicide rate is also extremely high due to pressure to perform scholastically. It's true that awareness of that "need" to get ahead economically was part of what Tsutomu used to rationalize/encourage his own alienization. However, the social forces you are referring to have not imposed themselves upon him externally. He's not being bullied, and he's not being put under scholastic pressure. Tsutomu chose to focus on studies and alienate himself from his classmates himself; someone truly being ostracized would've been a thousand times more aware of/grateful for the social refuge the Karuta club offered. Tsutomu is not a victim, and the anime doesn't portray him as one; if anyone could have been said to be showing real conformity to the standards of Japanese society, the one person most clearly doing that in that class was Tsutomu himself.
I agree that Tsutomu isn't getting bullied, at least not seriously. However, I don't think he chose to alienate himself from the rest of the class. His way of thinking is a defense mechanism he came up with after being ostracized due his difference. In order to deal with the crushing loneliness, he convinced himself that he's the one who chose to be alone, and even developed a sort of superiority complex ("those plebeians fools should be grateful to me for raising the class average") only kept in check by Taichi. Hard to pretend you're superior when somebody else is better than you at everything, after all. Even so, since studying is the thing he is best at -and the only thing he has-, he could do nothing but to keep trying. That is the only he found to exist.

Re-watch the flashback near the end of the episode (18 min in or so). Deep down, he desires to be accepted by others and that is part of the reason he immerses himself in his studies. He thought if he became number one, people would be forced to acknowledge him.
__________________
Mikan & Yami
Kanon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 10:23   Link #510
Triple_R
Center Attraction
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Age: 33
Send a message via AIM to Triple_R
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kanon View Post
I agree that Tsutomu isn't getting bullied, at least not seriously. However, I don't think he chose to alienate himself from the rest of the class. His way of thinking is a defense mechanism he came up with after being ostracized due his difference. In order to deal with the crushing loneliness, he convinced himself that he's the one who chose to be alone, and even developed a sort of superiority complex ("those plebeians fools should be grateful to me for raising the class average") only kept in check by Taichi. Hard to pretend you're superior when somebody else is better than you at everything, after all. Even so, since studying is the thing he is best at -and the only thing he has-, he could do nothing but to keep trying. That is the only he found to exist.

Re-watch the flashback near the end of the episode (18 min in or so). Deep down, he desires to be accepted by others and that is part of the reason he immerses himself in his studies. He thought if he became number one, people would be forced to acknowledge him.
Agreed. Very well said.

This is why I'm inclined to view Tsutomu as being a victim of bullying, much like how Arata was during the flashback portion of the show.

Dawnstorm is right that there's two types of bullying (if you choose to categorize the second type as "bullying"). The one I think westerners are most familiar with is where a specific group of people seeks out a vulnerable outsider to torment him/her. But in Japan, I'm getting the impression that the more common type of bullying is when a diffuse crowd of people is excluding an outsider and making jeers behind his/her back.

The "Japanese" form of bullying is less problematic in many ways in that it probably tends to come with less physical abuse and less annoying pranks. However, it's worse in the sense that it's trickier to stand up against and put a stop to. To stop the "western" form of bullying, you can either appeal to the majority of students who aren't part of the bullying group and try to get their help, or you can courageously stand up to the bully/bullies yourself.

But how do you stand up to a diffuse crowd of people? How do you appeal to a third party if there's no third party there?


My view on Tsutomu is that deep down inside he's very lonely, and has a need for a greater sense of belonging in the world. I think he has no real interest (at least yet) in the game of karuta, but being sincerely wanted to be part of a club - Not simply as a "warm body" to fill out five members but as a full-time contributing member - does appeal greatly to him.

Tsutumo doubted Chihaya's sincerity in this episode, but not the value of her offer if it was sincere. I think that Tsutumo felt that Chihaya's offer was "too good to be true". He felt that nobody would want him to join their club as a real member. I think that Taichi's words convinced Tsutumo that the Karuta Club was sincere in wanting him to be a member; not just anybody at all, but him specifically.
__________________
Triple_R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 10:46   Link #511
moncikoma
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
I love this anime, feels like hikarunogo all over again..

Too bad no ghost this time...

Plus i can learn a lot of hiragana..
moncikoma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 13:28   Link #512
Utsuro no Hako
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
I do find it interesting how this anime now has a second protagonist in the "bullied/ostracized kid" category (third if you count Kanade, although that's perhaps too mild to count for bullying).
I didn't get the impression that the people in the kendo club disliked Kanade. They seemed pretty accepting of her despite her complete lack of athletic ability; it was Kanade who was unhappy because kendo wasn't the outlet she was seeking.


Quote:
To use this sort of plot device once is no big deal, but to use it twice suggests to me that there's something more at play here than simply trying to give characters distinctive backgrounds.

A couple ideas:

1. The mangaka, Yuki Suetsugu, was herself a victim of bullying, or at least saw a lot of it during her days in school. If so, then this is at least a case of a mangaka following the good old adage of "writing what you know".

2. Suetsugu is trying to convey some sort of practical thematic point by coming back to the "bullied kid" characterization. Thundrakkon put forward some good ideas here, I think.
There's also the possibility that karuta is a nerdy game. If this were about a chess club at an American high school, wouldn't you be more surprised at someone like Chihaya being there than Tsutomu?

Quote:
With this episode, I'm starting to wonder if bullying is more common in Japanese high schools than what I had previously suspected (mainly since I don't recall seeing it as commonly in high school-based anime as I see in high school-based North American tv shows).
This sort of ostracism is pretty common in the school series I've seen -- Kimi ni Todoke is built around it, it's an important feature of Hasegawa's background in Haganai, and Kimi to Boku's has had two characters in similar situations; Haruka Nogizaka would be treated that way if anyone found out her secret, and the only thing saving Ryuuji Takasu from that fate is that everyone's afraid of him.
Utsuro no Hako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 14:41   Link #513
Guardian Enzo
Seishu's Ace
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Kagurazaka, Tokyo
I don't think that the common thread among all the kids in this show is bullying so much as outsider status. I don't disagree that elementary Arata and Desktomu suffered a form of bullying, but more than anything all of the characters - with the notable exception of Taichi - are somewhat isolated because of their quirks. Even beautiful Chihaya appears to have no close friends of her own gender, largely because she's an oddball of the first order.

The irony is that Taichi, while superficially the most "normal" and certainly the most popular, is arguably the most unhappy kid of the bunch. He's mastered the art of fitting in, in a way none of the others have, but it's brought him no satisfaction. He silently pines for Chihaya and constantly derides himself for what he sees as his shortcomings. The journey here isn't for the freaks and geeks to find happiness by becoming popular like Taichi - it's for him to become happier by letting go of his insecurities and following his heart, even if it means he's not as popular or "successful".
__________________
Guardian Enzo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 16:46   Link #514
Kanon
Kana Hanazawa ♥
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: France
Age: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
My view on Tsutomu is that deep down inside he's very lonely, and has a need for a greater sense of belonging in the world. I think he has no real interest (at least yet) in the game of karuta, but being sincerely wanted to be part of a club - Not simply as a "warm body" to fill out five members but as a full-time contributing member - does appeal greatly to him.

Tsutumo doubted Chihaya's sincerity in this episode, but not the value of her offer if it was sincere. I think that Tsutumo felt that Chihaya's offer was "too good to be true". He felt that nobody would want him to join their club as a real member. I think that Taichi's words convinced Tsutumo that the Karuta Club was sincere in wanting him to be a member; not just anybody at all, but him specifically.
That's exactly what I'm thinking. Tsutomu definitely want to belong somewhere, and so far, the only place his classmates have made him feel like he belongs is behind his desk. This idea worked his way through his mind and he ended up as we see it in this episode. However, deep down, he's still desperate to find a place in the world among others.

His distrust of Chihaya was very realistic. It's only natural to react this way when you're almost completely isolated from others and the prettiest girl at school suddenly approaches you to recruit you in her club. I would have thought something was fishy too. Thankfully for him, Chihaya's no ordinary beauty. I love how forceful she was, even going as far as to carry him out of classroom against his will



Quote:
Originally Posted by Guardian Enzo View Post
I don't think that the common thread among all the kids in this show is bullying so much as outsider status. I don't disagree that elementary Arata and Desktomu suffered a form of bullying, but more than anything all of the characters - with the notable exception of Taichi - are somewhat isolated because of their quirks. Even beautiful Chihaya appears to have no close friends of her own gender, largely because she's an oddball of the first order.
Indeed. The common point between the members of the club so far isn't so much their passion for Karuta (Tsutomu has none) as it their status as outsiders. In essence, Chihaya is building the Neighbor's Club

The last member might break the pattern though, since I think he's the rival of Arata we saw in the flashback.
__________________
Mikan & Yami
Kanon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 20:56   Link #515
ars89
One-Eyed Dragon
 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: NJ, USA
Age: 25
Lol Chihaya dragged Tsutomi all the way with his desk. Wow Taichi actually beat Chihaya. Glad had he overcame his past feelings, just like the feeling Tsutomi currently feels. Lol at Taichi throwing the desk. 1 more to go.
__________________
ars89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 21:02   Link #516
ThereminVox
Guess what time it is?
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Age: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ars89 View Post
Lol Chihaya dragged Tsutomi all the way with his desk. Wow Taichi actually beat Chihaya.
It was really neat watching his whole demeanor change as he began to realize that he could beat her. He showed a fire we hadn't seen from him for the game since he was part of Team Chihiyafuru.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ars89 View Post
Lol at Taichi throwing the desk. 1 more to go.
Deploying dramatic re-enactment in 3.. 2.. 1..

(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻
ThereminVox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-16, 23:11   Link #517
Master_Yoma
Nekokota Festival
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lost in the Fairy Forest
So Chihaya is doing what Haruhi was doing if you can get people to join kidnap them
__________________
Master_Yoma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-17, 03:36   Link #518
Kakkou
18歳腐った(?)少年
 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Tsutomu, dropping your desk and leaving it behind is great symbolism and everything but in the end, you're still gonna need that when you go back to class .

This show is really pleasant to watch. The preparations for Arata's inevitable return to karuta is going on well and the side characters being introduced have their individual charms. It was nice that Taichi got serious for once and managed to beat Chihaya. Wonder what kind of person they'll be getting as their fifth member? Hopefully someone Chihaya doesn't have to forcefully drag to the club this time.

On a side note, the beginning of the main bgm theme is starting to annoy me for some reason...
__________________
http://forums.animesuki.com/images/as.icon/signaturepics/sigpic101701_1.gif
Panel taken from here (NSFW-ish). Translation/type by some /a/non.
Kakkou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-17, 04:55   Link #519
Archon_Wing
Throw it on the ground
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Age: 30
Send a message via MSN to Archon_Wing
Chihaya is hella scary. All I know is that she's strong as hell if Karuta is involved. I wonder if Taichi has a bit more confidence now.
__________________
You just try again... through the darkness.You just go away... the future is waiting for us!
Avatar and Sig courtesy of TheEroKing
Guild Wars 2 SN: ArchonWing.9480 (Stormbluff Isle)
MyAnimeList || Reviews
Archon_Wing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-11-17, 09:33   Link #520
LKK
Moderator
*Moderator
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Age: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kakkou View Post
Tsutomu, dropping your desk and leaving it behind is great symbolism and everything but in the end, you're still gonna need that when you go back to class ..
My thought during the whole desk situation was "destruction of school property. That's going to look good on their school records."
__________________

Avatar: Hazuki of Natsuyuki Rendezvous / Signature: flowers from Natsuyuki Rendezvous
My manga list | My anime DVD list
LKK is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
josei, madhouse

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:09.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
We use Silk.