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Old 2010-01-02, 22:08   Link #141
Draneor
Aesop's Fox
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzo562 View Post
Does anyone know if the simulcasts are english subbed or are we watching the raws of the simulcasts no subs
They have subtitles. You can also usually watch them for free, if you're willing to wait a week.
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Old 2010-01-02, 22:09   Link #142
einhorn303
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzo562 View Post
im tempted to sign up.

I still have not done the 2 week free trial yet.

Does anyone know if the simulcasts are english subbed or are we watching the raws of the simulcasts no subs
They are English subtitled.

Kurokami is one CR show that was actually English dubbed while simulcast, but that's the only show so far like that (the North American company Bandai Entertainment worked side by side the Japanese studio while it was being aired).
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Old 2011-12-27, 01:11   Link #143
bigsocce
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Crunchyroll Has Nearly 70,000 Paid Subscribers

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news...id-subscribers

Quote:
The broadcaster TV Tokyo reported during a November 24 press conference in Tokyo that the media service Crunchyroll now has just under 70,000 paid subscribers, generating profit for TV Tokyo on this venture. Crunchyroll had in the range of 30,000 paid subscribers in the summer of 2010.

When asked to comment on TV Tokyo's statements, a Crunchyroll representative told ANN, "Today, we are generating meaningful revenue for not just TV Tokyo, but all of our valued publishers. We always welcome new publishers to use our channel to directly reach anime fans worldwide and generate significant revenue online."

Last edited by bigsocce; 2011-12-27 at 02:06.
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Old 2011-12-27, 01:13   Link #144
Kyuu
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So do the math. 70,000 times... how much per subscription?
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Old 2011-12-27, 01:24   Link #145
bigsocce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyuu View Post
So do the math. 70,000 times... how much per subscription?

$6.95/month
As low as $4.99/month when you get 12 months

Let's assume the average is between these two, about $6 a month.


70,000 x $6 x 12 months = $5,040,000 a year




Tiny compare to the like of Netflix (about $3 billion a year) or Hulu or even VEVO.


Hulu:

2009: $109 mil revenue
2010: $263 mil revenue
2011: ~$500 mil revenue (hulu projection)
2012: ???

VEVO

2010: $50 mil (first year)
2011: $150 mil
2012: $300 mil (projection)

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/a27a4...#axzz1h5GZFti5

Quote:
It will this week announce that it is streaming 3.7bn music videos a month. Doug Morris, the Sony Music chief executive who launched it two years ago while running Universal, told the Financial Times its revenues had risen from about $50m in 2010 to about $150m this year, and should hit $300m in 2012.



Also, Spotify (music subscription) will cross the 3 million paid subscribers mark in 2 months time.
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Old 2011-12-27, 01:27   Link #146
bigsocce
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Though $5 million in subscription revenue is a lot more than getting $0,000,000 from fansubs.





1 million paid subscribers x $6 x 12 = $72 mil a year


However, going from 70,000 to 1,000,000 paid subscribers will take many years. Not sure Crunchyroll will survive till then if Hulu and Netflix outbid Crunchyroll to the content. Anime content is the lifeblood of Crunchyroll.



Anime is getting popular on Hulu lately. If anime makes up 2% of hulu video views, that's $500 mil x 2% = $10 million

Hulu:

2009: $109 mil revenue
2010: $263 mil revenue
2011: ~$500 mil revenue (hulu projection)
2012: ??? ($800 mil revenue??????)

If hulu goes after the anime content aggressively, Crunchyroll might be in trouble.
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Old 2011-12-27, 01:38   Link #147
bigsocce
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One note of interest: VEVO and AMV

An anime music video (AMV) is a music video consisting of clips from one or more animations set to an audio track (often songs or movie/show trailer audio); the term usually refers to fan-made unofficial videos.

VEVO

2010: $50 mil (first year)
2011: $150 mil
2012: $300 mil (projection)



What if VEVO signs a content deal with anime companies?

VEVO provides the music
Anime companies provide the animations
Fans are allowed to use the "provided" music and animation to make AMV.
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Old 2011-12-27, 01:52   Link #148
Marcus H.
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Fans are allowed to use the "provided" music and animation to make AMV.
Oh, I'm not so sure about that.
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Old 2011-12-27, 02:10   Link #149
bigsocce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus H. View Post
Oh, I'm not so sure about that.
VEVO has around 75% of the English language music. (Sony, Universal, EMI and a lot of indie). Which mean you can use any of their songs.

Anime companies (if they sign the license) will provide most of the animation.



For example, if you want to create a AMV using Full Metal Alchemist and Rihanna's We Found Love, you can check to see if this will qualify.

You make the video.
You upload the video.
VEVO licenses that video with its VEVO stamp.
VEVO and the anime companies share the profit. The AMV you created will now benefit your favorite artists and your favorite anime.


1 billion VEVO views = $7 million USD (more than what Crunchyroll annual subscription revenue)
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Old 2011-12-27, 02:12   Link #150
Marcus H.
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Youtube also has official videos to many songs under Sony and other music companies.
However, there are mountains of cases involving AMVs taken down due to "infringement claims" by Sony.
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Old 2011-12-27, 02:57   Link #151
TinyRedLeaf
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It would be even more interesting if we could do the flip side of the mathematics, that is, what are the estimated costs of running a service like Crunchyroll or Netflix? What are the licensing costs? What are the overheads? The cost of running and maintaining a server farm and the network? How much labour are we talking about and what do they cost?

Revenues of US$5million a year may seem juicy... until you take a look at the margin.
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Old 2011-12-27, 03:29   Link #152
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
It would be even more interesting if we could do the flip side of the mathematics, that is, what are the estimated costs of running a service like Crunchyroll or Netflix? What are the licensing costs? What are the overheads? The cost of running and maintaining a server farm and the network? How much labour are we talking about and what do they cost?

Revenues of US$5million a year may seem juicy... until you take a look at the margin.
Operating expenses for 2006-2010 for netflix is roughly 25.5% of the revenue, excluding taxes, dividends, COGS, etc.

Net income is around 6.42% of total revenue.

Though what I find fishy is that the cost of goods sold accounts for 64.3% of the total revenue earned, I wonder if some creative accounting is involved so they could pay a little extra to the bosses who negotiated the licenses to redistribute the content.

Btw, note that the article mentioned "revenue", not "income", meaning which costs and taxes and equity payouts are not factored in. I would like to see their financials if they have the guts to claim profit is made.
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Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.

Last edited by SaintessHeart; 2011-12-27 at 03:47.
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Old 2011-12-27, 03:56   Link #153
TinyRedLeaf
. . .
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
Operating expenses for 2006-2010 for netflix is roughly 25.5% of the revenue, excluding taxes, dividends, COGS, etc.

Net income is around 6.42% of total revenue.

Though what I find fishy is that the cost of goods sold accounts for 64.3% of the total revenue earned, I wonder if some creative accounting is involved so they could pay a little extra to the bosses who negotiated the licenses to redistribute the content.

Btw, note that the article mentioned "revenue", not "income", meaning which costs and taxes and equity payouts are not factored in. I would like to see their financials if they have the guts to claim profit is made.
AnimeNewsNetwork article used both "profit" and "revenue". Crunchyroll spokesman said "meaningful revenue", while story intro says "generating profit". I'm more inclined to believe what the spokesman said, as plenty of reporters are ignorant about the difference between profit and revenue.

Bear in mind that different terminologies are used in British and American accounting conventions. In Singapore, for example, "earnings" is often used synonymously with "revenue" but, in the United States, "earnings" means "profit". Confusion ensues.
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Old 2011-12-27, 04:11   Link #154
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
AnimeNewsNetwork article used both "profit" and "revenue". Crunchyroll spokesman said "meaningful revenue", while story intro says "generating profit". I'm more inclined to believe what the spokesman said, as plenty of reporters are ignorant about the difference between profit and revenue.

Bear in mind that different terminologies are used in British and American accounting conventions. In Singapore, for example, "earnings" is often used synonymously with "revenue" but, in the United States, "earnings" means "profit". Confusion ensues.
Oh no! I have a body of a chicken, but my head is elsewhere!

That isn't actually about the difference in usage of vocabulary, but rather, the words have been used weasely to make the statement sound positive, since social support to them means more equity for the investors. Also, the long term use of "revenue" as "profit" serves to assist in hijacking the dorsolateral cortex of the people who follow CR's financial developments, associating both terms together regularly makes the readers think that revenue IS profit (which isn't), thus consolidating support for the company by giving people more "good things" to say about it.

Generally speaking, the company is started by VCs or fresh angels, so I am not exactly confident that it will be sustainable or become big-cap like Fox in the long run. If they go IPO, it is a sign of the next dotcom, except that the powerpoint presentations are replaced with ghost accounts of subscribers.
__________________

When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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Old 2011-12-27, 04:21   Link #155
TinyRedLeaf
. . .
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
Oh no! I have a body of a chicken, but my head is elsewhere!

That isn't actually about the difference in usage of vocabulary, but rather, the words have been used weasely to make the statement sound positive, since social support to them means more equity for the investors.

Generally speaking, the company is started by VCs or fresh angels, so I am not exactly confident that it will be sustainable or become big-cap like Fox in the long run. If they go IPO, it is a sign of the next dotcom, except that the powerpoint presentations are replaced with ghost accounts of subscribers.
Let's get real: Has there ever been a company financial statement that doesn't aim to show the rosiest possible picture of the firm's finances?

To get to the meat, we'd need insider info, but it's not like we'd catch such a break on an amateur forum. Still, for what it's worth, revenue information is better than no information at all. Better yet, revenue data is harder to fudge than profit figures, so some analysts would prefer to know that, especially in the case of start-ups, which generally aren't expected to be profitable in their early years.

And I do have a vested interest in seeing Crunchyroll succeed, since I'm one of those 70,000 subscribers.
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Old 2011-12-27, 04:51   Link #156
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
Let's get real: Has there ever been a company financial statement that doesn't aim to show the rosiest possible picture of the firm's finances?
Those major companies looking to reconsolidate or reprice their shares?

Quote:
To get to the meat, we'd need insider info, but it's not like we'd catch such a break on an amateur forum. Still, for what it's worth, revenue information is better than no information at all. Better yet, revenue data is harder to fudge than profit figures, so some analysts would prefer to know that, especially in the case of start-ups, which generally aren't expected to be profitable in their early years.

And I do have a vested interest in seeing Crunchyroll succeed, since I'm one of those 70,000 subscribers.
I don't want CR to be too successful or else those anime companies are going to lie on their laurels again and refuse to adapt to the constantly changing media industry.

I don't think I want it to go down under either because it stands as a force against overpriced hardcopy distribution. The lacking of financials and that ambiguious statement about profits made me suspect that they are looking for more liquidity to pay out their shareholders rather than concentrating on getting the business stable : a sign of hype to damage to credibility of the industry should it collapse.
__________________

When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.

Last edited by SaintessHeart; 2011-12-27 at 05:02.
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Old 2011-12-27, 12:24   Link #157
Utsuro no Hako
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigsocce View Post
However, going from 70,000 to 1,000,000 paid subscribers will take many years. Not sure Crunchyroll will survive till then if Hulu and Netflix outbid Crunchyroll to the content. Anime content is the lifeblood of Crunchyroll.
Netflix doesn't have any simulcasts that I know of -- they wait until the DVD comes out and license it from the American distributor. And they almost always use the dub, so I doubt they'd be interested in adding a bunch of subbed shows. Hulu does have simulcasts, but they're usually stuff that's being streamed on other sites as well -- often including CR.

The big worry for CR is the deal between Nico Nico and Funimation, which pretty much gives Funi first dibs on a bunch of titles and is probably the reason CR has so many fewer series for the fall season compared to summer when they had almost everything interesting.
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Old 2011-12-28, 08:34   Link #158
bigsocce
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Netflix could corner the anime market easily.

Crunchyroll offers say $10 mil a year.
Netflix revenue is over $3.5 billion a year.

$10 mil would be like 0.2857% for them.


Let's assume there are 200,000 anime lovers. 200,000 x $7.99 x 12 months = $19.2 million a year.


It will be a battle between Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime in the future for anime content.
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Old 2011-12-28, 09:13   Link #159
Marcus H.
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I honestly wouldn't leave providing anime content in the west to big shots like Hulu, for example. Once providing anime becomes corporate, it loses the link between those who provide the anime series and those who watch them. Money will be the only thing on their minds.

What Crunchyroll is doing is decent enough as it is.
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Old 2011-12-28, 10:33   Link #160
Random32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigsocce View Post
Netflix could corner the anime market easily.

Crunchyroll offers say $10 mil a year.
Netflix revenue is over $3.5 billion a year.

$10 mil would be like 0.2857% for them.


Let's assume there are 200,000 anime lovers. 200,000 x $7.99 x 12 months = $19.2 million a year.


It will be a battle between Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime in the future for anime content.
You forgot fansubs. Crunchyroll is the only one that is remotely competitive imho. And even then, fansubs provide significantly higher quality and no region lock.
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