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Old 2012-01-15, 11:53   Link #1
warita
Dai-Youkai
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Vienna
Food you cook

Hello everybody!!!

I love to cook for my family and friends and I like to try new exotic dishes from all around the world. So I figured it wouldnt be a bad idea to open a thread, where we can exchange recipes and "brag" about the food we can or cannot cook, haha

All kinds of recipes are welcome, even simple but yummie ones. One doesnt always feel like cooking, especially if short on time. If you can post a photo of the dish cooked, that would be even better.


So now for what I have cooked: I made wonderful fried shrimps this weekend. The weather was so nice, the bright sun rays caressed my eyes in the morning and I woke up feeling energised and decided to go to the farmer market in the center of Vienna and couldnt resist buying some fresh unfrozen tiger shrimps. A kidney transplant on the black market is cheaper than the shrimps, but I just couldnt say no this time.

At home I pondered how to prepare them and googled some recipes, until I decided to improvise something on my own, out of experience I know this brings the best results. The preparation I decided to go for was super easy, as usually.

Ingredients:
1. Tiger shrimps, skinned, veined and washed
2. lemon juice (1-2 tablespoon)
3. Olive oil (1-2 tablespoon)
4. salt, pepper, yellow thai curry (I still had some of the yellow thai curry paste left from last week. I must use it within a week or two, so I am trying to put it in as many dishes as possible and it sure went damn well with the shrimps)
5. minced garlic
6. brown sugar (weak tea spoon)

Preparation:
1. Mix all the ingredients except the shrimps together and whip it (the result looks almost a little like a light liquid mayonaise).
2. Por the marinade over the shrimps and let it rest for an hour
3. Heat some oil on the pan and add the shrimps, fry on both sides about 2 minutes
4. Pour the marinade on the shrimps and allow the marinade to caramelise over the shrimps.

If any of you guys like shrimps, you gotta try this. It is a great appetizer dish in my opinion and the whole preparation including cooking didnt take longer than 10 minutes.

I apologize for not adding a picture, I meant to make one, but then totally forgot. I will make one next time I make this dish, I promise
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Old 2012-01-15, 17:19   Link #2
Lost Cause
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Virginia
Age: 36
Oh how nice a recipe thread!!
Here's something fast thatt you can make outdoors over a fire or on a grill (preferably) or inside on your stove. This is capable if feeding up too 6 people.
Take one pound of hamburger and make into nice sized patties ( thunk at least a half inch thick or more). Next slice up three to four good sized potatoes and slice them long ways about an eighth of an inch thick or more, it's up to you as to wether or not you want to leave the skins on. Next do the same with some onions.
Now take aluminum foil and cut it into 12 inch by 12 inch squares and first put your potatoe slices down (as many as you like, I usually put at least 6 per bundle) then your meat, at which time you add your favorite seasoning, then top it off with a few onion slices.
Fold the foil top to bottom then side to side with the shiny side in so it will cook the food. After preparing the bundles (and yes you can do this with just about any food even veggies) place them flat side down over the heat and let cook fit at least 7 minutes, then flip and do the other side. Upon opening you can drain all the grease if you like (I don't since it adds to the flavor) and serve either in the bundle or on dishes.
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Old 2012-01-15, 17:42   Link #3
Alchemist007
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Age: 25
Pasta...from a package
Raamen...from a package
Eggs...from a shell

Hah, the closest thing I 'make' is a cheese-lettuce-tomato sandvich.
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Old 2012-01-15, 18:16   Link #4
Transitions
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Baja California sur Mexico
Age: 30
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uff! it's a good topic, cook for the family, is an honor that not everyone accepts xD,

usually Mexican food is not very nutritious, but it is delicious! when I was living in Cd Juarez learned something of American food and I had the joy of cooking a "pozole".

I'll show you some pictures about Mexican food:

Spoiler for Food:


All those dishes I have prepared a few times when working in restaurants.

Enjoy

thanks for the topic!
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Old 2012-01-15, 18:19   Link #5
Alchemist007
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Age: 25
I still avoid fast food thankfully (aside from the pizza once in a while).

Those are my lazy foods btw, mom still makes the real meals
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Old 2012-01-15, 18:55   Link #6
Dhomochevsky
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Join Date: May 2004
Location: Germany
Age: 32
- some sort of fish filet, whatever I bought
- frozen vegetable mix
- rice, or roasted potatoes (also frozen)

Put fish and vegetables in a pan with olive oil, cook rice, or put potatoes in the oven. Done.
I like to buy mainly frozen stuff, so I can eat it whenever I want and don't have to look out for expiring dates.
If I buy fresh food, some of it will end up in the trash, because I forget about it for too long.
And frozen vegetables are actually better than "fresh" ones, nutrient wise.
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Old 2012-01-15, 19:54   Link #7
DonQuigleone
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Age: 25
Stir frying. You can make a pretty good meal, it's quick and it's very easy.

I can put my rice on and be finished with the rest before the rice is done. And with that I have at least 2 days worth of eating. Not bad I say.

To get best value for money you do need to learn how to make your own sauces. While packaged sauces are nice, they're terrible value for money. Luckily making sauces is easy, it just requires knowing the formulae. A fairly simple base is 1 part Sesame oil, 2-3 parts soy sauce and 1 part sugar. That'll take you pretty far. For something with a better kick, add ~part black pepper. To make even better sauces you'll need to acquire some decent ingredients though.

I tend to mix my stir fry with my rice at the end, making it all into a kind of "cake". It doesn't look pretty, but it tastes great.
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Old 2012-01-16, 03:36   Link #8
Kafriel
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Athens (GMT+2)
Age: 25
How to make veal on rice

Ingredients
- Yellow rice (the common kind).
- chopped calf, preferably with the bone removed.
- olive oil
- salt, pepper, a head of garlic, a small onion.
- tomato paste

Getting started: Since both rice and meat take long to cook, you may want to use two plates on your stove, and a steamer for the meat. First, pour some olive oil for the rice; once it heats up, stir the rice for a while till it gets some color (i.e. becomes sauteed), then add water and let it boil. You should use two glasses of water for every glass of rice. Sprinkle some salt and close the lid, set a 17' timer.

Move on to make the veal now. Peel the onion and chop it up along with the garlic. You can also add a green pepper, also chopped up, if you feel like it.

Pour some olive oil, let it burn, then add the veal. Make sure it is drained well to avoid unnecessary burns on your hands! Toss in the onion garlic and green pepper, add salt and pepper and stir it for a while, as you did with the rice. All of this will help get rid of the strong flavour of meat and give it a better taste.

Add tomato paste and water in a 1:3 ratio and stir some more. close the lid and pay attention. Once the pressure builds up, lower the power on your cooker; on a scale from 0 to 9, if you had it on 9 before, turn it to 3 now. In order to soften up the meat, you'll be needing about 20~24 minutes before putting it out.

Concluding: Make sure you get the rice off the place once it's done, or it will get burned. Once the meat's done too, release the steam and it's ready to serve.

Note that the time it takes to cook depends greatly on the appliances you use, the ones I mentioned are for a 10kW cooker w/4 plates and an oven.

You can also make a variation of this, using lemon, parsley and oregano instead if you're more into white sauce.
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Old 2012-01-16, 10:51   Link #9
Miko Miko
Imouto-Chan♥
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Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: England
Age: 20
I always make chilli ~

All you need is Mince beef, chilli powder, tomatoes, rice and kidney beans.

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Old 2012-01-16, 23:24   Link #10
Vexx
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 56
Good lord, we probably have a hundred recipes we cycle through regularly and we're always trying new ones... japanese fare dominates, but we have indian, chinese, korean, italian, and even "southern white honky" night at times. I'll try to pick a few favorites out tomorrow.
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Old 2012-01-16, 23:59   Link #11
Urzu 7
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: New England
Age: 30
Vexx, do you live in the U.S.? You say you eat a lot of Japanese food and I was wondering if it is hard to get certain ingredients for Japanese meals sometimes.

I've got some recipes to share sometime, including a great veggie soup (the kind I make is better than any other kind I've had for veggie medley soups), muenster chicken (made it two days ago, was the best chicken I have ever made, by far), and stuffed cabbage (with rice and seasoned ground beef). I've made some great homemade beef stew and baked macaroni and cheese, too. I've made a great Texas style chili before, too.

Sometime soon, I'd like to make perogies from scratch for my first time. Potato and onion perogies, pan fried with butter and with sauteed onions and served with sour cream. I plan to create a Russian beet salad to go with it (it will include carrots, diced red onion, diced deli style dill pickle, fresh herbs, seasoning, and olive oil). Geez, I just remembered a lamb dinner I wanna make sometime kind of soon-ish, too! (With a Greek yogurt sauce to go with it, and some vegetable curry couscous)

I like trying new things with cooking meals and working up an arsenal of recipes I'm good at making. I'd like to have a wife someday, and share cooking with her, and sometimes do special meals at home with her.

Three days ago, my brothers and I got together and we pan fried tilapia. A couple of filets with Cajun seasoning, and then the rest with fresh ground salt and pepper, and then served with lemon on our plates. We ate it with white rice and cooked broccoli, carrots, and cauliflower. Easy to make and tastes great. This week, I'd like to get together with some people, and grill up (George Foeman grill since it is winter) with some boneless salmon, and then put it between two bagel halves with cream cheese on them. That is my idea for dinner some night.
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Last edited by Urzu 7; 2012-01-17 at 00:23.
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Old 2012-01-17, 00:20   Link #12
Vexx
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urzu 7 View Post
Vexx, do you live in the U.S.? You say you eat a lot of Japanese food and I was wondering if it is hard to get certain ingredients for Japanese meals sometimes.

I've got a decent number of recipes to share. I plan to contribute to this thread.
I live near Portland, Oregon and we're lucky enough to have several asian food markets (Anzen, Uwajimaya, H-Mart, Fubonn, a number of mom'n'pop stores of japanese/korean/indian/etc types). Its a fairly "foodie" town which we freely admit to being... sometimes we assert the purpose of travel is to find new foods and eat them.

When we used to live in Houston TX, getting japanese ingredients was tough. The closest decent market was an hour+ drive. In fact, for a few decades, my wife's grandfather *was* the importer for all the japanese families on the north side of town.

You might be able order basic items (spices, pickled stuff, etc) online if your town sucks for access.
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Old 2012-01-17, 01:01   Link #13
Kismet-chan
The Chaotic Dreamer
 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: In a cruel yet beautiful world
Age: 22
Creamy Gnocchi Soup with Mushrooms and Spinach

Ingredients:
1 and a half cups of chicken broth (Or whatever broth you're comfortable with)
Half a cup of whipping cream (You can can use half & half or heavy cream if you want)
Gnocchi (Buy any kind from your local supermarket)
About a handful or two of uncooked spinachleaves
About a handful or two of your favorite mushrooms, chopped
Half an onion, chopped or diced
Pepper, salt, garlic, italian seasoning, and cayenne pepper to taste (You may omit or substitute any of these)
A dash or two of salt

In a pot combine olive oil (just enough to coat the bottom of the pot) and butter/margarine on medium-high heat. One the butter is melted, add the onion. Cook the onion until translucent. Add chicken broth and bring to a gentle boil. Add gnocchi and let simmer until cooked (alternatively you can cook the gnocchi separately in water like you would normal pasta, following the directions you're given on the packaging, and then add it to the soup once tender).

Lower the heat and stir in cream. Do not let the soup boil if possible, remove from the heat for a minute if necessary. (If it does boil it's no big deal, but don't let it boil continuously or you might get something funky!) Add spinach and mushrooms. Add all seasonings to personal taste at this point. Cover the pot and let the soup simmer for another 10 mins. It's done!

---

Smoked Salmon Sandwich

Ingredients:
Smoked Salmon or Nova Lox
Cream cheese
1 slice raw onion (I'd recommend red onion or vidallia/sweet onion)
1-2 tomato slices
Your favorite bread
Lemon juice (optional)
Pepper to taste (optional)

Spread some cream cheese on both slices. Top one slice with salmon, onion, and tomato. Add pepper and lemon juice if you like (if you're using nova lox, I add it to help diffuse some of the saltiness). Put the other slice on top and eat!

Try adding avocado slices for some added creaminess. If you don't like onion or are just looking for some extra crunch, try adding baby spinach (or any veggie leaf you want). It's so yummy!
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Old 2012-01-17, 01:04   Link #14
GundamFan0083
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: classified
My favorite recipe site online.
I love the Lamb-Kebab:
http://www.jannagur.com/108704/Diana-Lamb-Kebab

Here is the full list of online recipes:
http://www.jannagur.com/108704/recipes

ENJOY!
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Old 2012-01-23, 19:00   Link #15
DonQuigleone
Knight Errant
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Age: 25
So today, for the first time, I used Sichuan peppercorns in my cooking. Roasting them and grinding them was a bit irritating, and the smell is very... unusual. Technically they're not even peppercorns, but that's their name, so whatever.

However, once I actually made my dish I found it's end effect to be very surprising, while it's flavour is pretty mild (a bit like lemon?), it has very strange other effects, namely a mildly numbing effect on the tongue that is quite pleasant. It's like conventional spiciness, but not at the same time. Considering how conventional "hot" spicyness is so popular, I was surprised that I'd never come across such a sensation before.

Why aren't Sichuan peppercorns used more often? I haven't even encountered it at most of the Chinese (or other) restaurants I've been to. Anyone else have anything to say about these strange peppercorns?
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Old 2012-01-24, 00:13   Link #16
Vexx
Obey the Darkly Cute ...
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonQuigleone View Post
So today, for the first time, I used Sichuan peppercorns in my cooking. Roasting them and grinding them was a bit irritating, and the smell is very... unusual. Technically they're not even peppercorns, but that's their name, so whatever.

However, once I actually made my dish I found it's end effect to be very surprising, while it's flavour is pretty mild (a bit like lemon?), it has very strange other effects, namely a mildly numbing effect on the tongue that is quite pleasant. It's like conventional spiciness, but not at the same time. Considering how conventional "hot" spicyness is so popular, I was surprised that I'd never come across such a sensation before.

Why aren't Sichuan peppercorns used more often? I haven't even encountered it at most of the Chinese (or other) restaurants I've been to. Anyone else have anything to say about these strange peppercorns?
Chinese restaurants that don't use them in Sichuan food are either being lazy or can't find the peppers locally... which is still being lazy imo

The only slack I cut for such is that some regions are simply ..... too white-bread-mayo to tolerate much in the way of spice and the restaurants just dial it down completely (which makes me sad...)
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Old 2012-01-24, 03:23   Link #17
DonQuigleone
Knight Errant
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
The only slack I cut for such is that some regions are simply ..... too white-bread-mayo to tolerate much in the way of spice and the restaurants just dial it down completely (which makes me sad...)
Ireland is fairly "White-bread-mayo" it must be said. However, it's been improving a lot over the years.

As far as I'm aware though, there is only one Sichuan restaurant in Dublin (not that I've done an authoritative survey), the rest being more conventional Cantonese style. That single Sichuan restuarant is fairly popular, and it probably was using Sichuan peppers, but I wasn't noticing due to the fact that every meal I ate there I was continuously dousing a fire in my mouth!
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Old 2012-01-24, 04:01   Link #18
Flower
Cute as a button! ^^
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Join Date: May 2010
Location: In a Half-broken music box....
Hmm ... I eat all kinds of different types of food ... with Italian food being the type I enjoy preparing the most. I especially love preparing flour based gravies, tomato based sauces to go on ... well, anything!

They type of food I love to eat (i.e. can't prepare much of anything of it) is Japanese cuisine. When I visited Japan a few years ago the folks I was staying with would prepare food by hand and I was in heaven! Even with that I was once taken to a restaurant in Kanazawa, and the seafood was inhumanly scrumptious. Oh wait ... I am diverging from the OP of the thread. Sorry!

I like to prepare Baba ghanoush too. Here is the base recipe from the link:

Quote:
...In the traditional method, the eggplant is first roasted in an oven for approximately 30 to 90 minutes (depending on the size of the eggplant) until the skin appears almost burnt and the eggplant begins to collapse. The softened flesh is scooped out, squeezed or salted to remove excess water, and is then pureed with the tahini. There are many variants of the recipe, especially the seasoning. Seasonings include garlic, lemon juice, ground cumin, salt, mint, and parsley. When served on a plate or bowl, it is traditional to drizzle the top with olive oil....
I like to eat it on top of home made Focaccia.

Great stuff.
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Old 2012-01-24, 08:19   Link #19
Paranoid Android
Underweight Food Hoarder
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Kitch-Water and T.O., Canada
Age: 22
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My favorite dish that I can actually cook is spicy stir-fried kidneys. I make this usually for special occasions.

I don't follow recipes when I cook nor do I measure my stuff. I'm just gonna wing this:

- Pork kidney, cut it into thick slices (clean the middle of the kidney), then carve patterns into each slice (increase surface area for flavour, and appeal)

Spoiler for Pattern:


- Soak it in cold water with a spoon of salt (Eyeball it) and several spoons of chili paste for an hour. Then drain.

- Cut a cucumber into thin slices (diagonally), or some Japanese squash/cucumber looking thing that I can't name.

- Split 1~2 bamboo shoots into thin slices.

- Crush garlic, ginger. Cut leek rings.

- Fill a pan or w/e with a thick line of oil (I like to use petroleum ) and Soy sauce. How much soy sauce is based on # of people and preference. I just pour it out of the bottle so I can't give a # of spoons.

- Catapult the kidneys and bamboo shoots into the pan. Add Sichuan peppercorn and 10~20 whole dried red hot chili pepper (the band of course). You could split them for more spiciness or use green. It depends on your diplomatic relations with red and green peppers.

- Stir for an arbitrary 30 seconds. If the kidney slices look dead, mix the cucumber slices and ginger. Also add a small amount of sugar. I recall my mother said it brings out something out of the dish (It summons Cthulu)

- When the kidneys look brown-gray (EDIBLE) and bamboo shoots are floppy like chinese swords, pour the whole thing into a deep plate (if there's a lot of liquid. you may need to drain. I know Canadian meat all have hammerspace holding 50 gallons of water/blood)

- Sprinkle the leek rings and garlic at the end.

- Some people add other types of oils for certain tastes, I don't add anything.

- Serve


On a normal day, I
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchemist007 View Post
Pasta...from a package
Raamen...from a package
Eggs...from a shell
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Old 2012-01-24, 08:49   Link #20
Ithekro
Space Battleship
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Republic of California
Age: 36
I don't cook all that often (in terms of making stuff rather than just adding heat).

I make desserts from time to time. One is known as Scotch Crunchies. It has a story behind it.

It was out of a Betty Crocker cookbook. But one of my college courses wanted us to make "traditional ethnic meals" for a holiday party. My family, having been on this continent for 13 generations...doesn't have an ethic dish anymore. We have dessert. We have Scots-Irish as a background...so Scotch Crunchies became an "ethnic food".

It normally calls for:
1 cup chocolate chips
1 cup butterscotch chips
1 cup of salted cashews
2 cups of chow mein noodles

You basically melt the two kinds of chips together in a double boiler, then remove from heat and mix in the nuts and noodles until covered. Then drop them a teaspoon at a time on wax paper. Cool in a refrigerator until solid. Serve. Makes about 4 dozen.

I've changed it from time to time. I've made double batches though there is barely enough room in the double boiler to mix that all together.

I've substituted peanut butter chips for the butterscotch. That tasted fine. I substituted white chocolate for the chocolate (that did not taste as good, nor did it melt very well. They were edible, but not as good, it also didn't look very good). I recently substituted cinnimon chips for the butterscotch chips because that is what we had. They turned out fairly good...a little heavy on the cinnimon smell and flavor, but they taste good.
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