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Old 2012-02-23, 22:08   Link #1
tugatosmk
1982 tuga
 
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Portugal
720p vs 1080p BD-rips on Full HD on Samsung LCD UE32D 6530

I've been comparing the image quality and definition of some BD-rip releases of some anime in their 720p and 1080p versions when available on my 32" Samsung LCD UE32D 6530.

I couldn't note any higher "visible" definition from the 1080p BD-rip comparing with the 720p from the same fansubber. I paused both videos at the same time stamp, stood something like 1 feet from the LCD and my eyes couldn't detect any diference. I then proceeded to resize a piece of the 720p version to 1080p and merge it to the correspondent piece of the original 1080p and merge them togheter (using Virtualdub, lagarith and then xvid on an insane bitrate). The pieces were 3 seconds still footage to better compare. I couldn't detect any difference once more.

I first concluded that the 1080p versions were merely up-scaled from the 720p. So why get the hugely bigger 1080p versions when the 720p provides the same definition and quality?

But then I've googled some more and found out not only this forum (http://forums.bakabt.me/index.php?topic=27201.40), but also that most original Blurays are 1080i, while only few are true 1080p, and that the 1080i ones can only be ripped into 720p (here leading to the possible upscaling).

Some things I got from there is that only from 40" onward (taking the same viewing distance to better compare, something like 2,5 meters (aprox. 6,5 feet) that 1080p better definition over 720p is noticeable. Another thing is the "future proof" theory: if a larger LCD is purchased (like a 52" LCD, for example), I'd better have a 1080p, apparently.

Or my own "future" theory (I can't predict the future, obviously, so these are just suppositions): when VHS and CRT TV were fully accepted as the standard in the early-90's (or even the mid-90's), I think few common consumers imagined the future unknown DVD standard and LCD TV to completely change the video scenario. Then came the Bluray, Full-HD LCD TV and HD broadcast to do the same... Who knows what will happen 10 years from now?... Maybe the creation of "Green-ray" discs and "Super-HD" resolutions like twice the 1080p (2160p, cool) or something, making the previous Bluray and Full HD "obsolete".
Also, a "Super-HD" LCD would make the 1080p releases look worse compared to the older (today's) LCDs, just like today's LCD make DVDs look worse than on a CRT TV...
Then, anime fansubbers would rip the new discs and provide super-quality fansubs, rendering 1080p rips "obsolete", just like when 720p and 1080p made DVD 480p rips obsolete... Then why keep the 1080p on the first place?...


So, after this long post, I was wondering your opinions regarding my post, my image comparisons, and ultimately if should get 1080p BD-rip versions even if they look the same as 720p to me.
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Last edited by tugatosmk; 2012-02-23 at 22:36. Reason: More info I forgot to add
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Old 2012-02-23, 22:34   Link #2
DragoZERO
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: USA
Age: 28
How do you put it on the TV? Straight from the computer? What kind of cable? What codec pack do you use?
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Old 2012-02-23, 22:57   Link #3
tugatosmk
1982 tuga
 
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Portugal
Quote:
Originally Posted by DragoZERO View Post
How do you put it on the TV? Straight from the computer? What kind of cable? What codec pack do you use?
I have 3 ways:

A) Using Mezzmo to remotely access my PC HDD directly from my LCD, and then the LCD software plays the video and audio codecs it supports, like most x264, for example (the Samsung SmartTV is really good. );

B) Connecting a 2,5" HDD via USB to the LCD, and then using again the LCD own playing software;

C) Using a ASUS media center box to playback (with remote control) via HDMi - this is the most versatile one in terms of codec versatility, but not playback control.

A, B and C all presented the same quality and definition in the tests I performed as described in my first post.

But there's a D): Connecting my laptop to the LCD via HDMi, but for some reason the image quality isn't as good (even the laptop desktop wallpaper looks not so good), regardless of the output resolution, so I try no to use it and dismissed it form the list (not to mention I have nearly zero playback control while lying on my couch, I can't use a remote control).
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Old 2012-02-23, 23:24   Link #4
DragoZERO
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: USA
Age: 28
Your quality discrepancy is from the proxies you use to watch it on the TV. I use the PS3 Media Server which transcodes and streams to my PS3 over my network. But the transcoding it where I lose some quality. For example, FLAC audio is useless since it's converted to AC3 for the PS3. I do have great video quality since I'm running gigabit ethernet though.

Using a good computer outputting on an HDMI is the best way to do it. Try updating your drivers and double checking the settings on the computer and TV to fix the resolution. Make sure you are outputting the the TV (projector) only too. As for a remote, you can get a bluetooth adapter, a PS3 remote control and some software to make a nice remote control for your computer or get a wireless mouse.
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