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Old 2012-02-26, 01:19   Link #2261
monsta666
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
More like rather than 10 seconds with google or even just browsing the existing threads here they.... oh never mind - thanks for being civil
Maybe people prefer the personal Vexx touch rather than the impersonal google!
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Old 2012-02-27, 00:34   Link #2262
aohige
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But... "personal Vexx touch" is the same as 1930$&&:@!/&$ssdkjh


"btw is it true that Japanese kids beg for chocolates from the American soldiers on the street?"

..... Hey, at least I moved up two decades.
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Old 2012-02-27, 01:18   Link #2263
risingstar3110
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If a mother (or one with motherly status - teacher, aunt, and such) told a kid that she loves him/her, which verb would she uses? Suki/daisuki? Aisu/Aishiteru?
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Old 2012-02-28, 05:24   Link #2264
Shinji01
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Mother – Aishiteru or Daisuki. But aishiteru would only be when she really is trying to tell the child that he/she is loved. Otherwise on a daily manner it would be daisuki.

Teacher - Daisuki.

Aunt - Daisuki

But to be honest, I cant imagine that conversation happening in a Japanese setting too much. Usually we don’t express our feelings verbally. Maybe to a young child, but not when you get to a certain age.. maybe up until the child is 9 to 10 ish…?

Would love to hear other people’s opinion on this one though 
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Old 2012-02-28, 05:39   Link #2265
Sumeragi
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I imagine "daisuki". "Aishiteru" is just too strong a word in my opinion.
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Old 2012-02-28, 07:19   Link #2266
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If I will use "daisuki" for just saying "I liked you"( not the romantic way) to a new female friend without mistaking it as "I love you"... How would I avoid the possible misunderstanding.
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Old 2012-02-28, 12:38   Link #2267
Sumeragi
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Just say "suki", and don't make the atmosphere and your tone of voice romantic. I mean, just think of how you would say "I like you" to a girl.


I wish to state this: At least half of the questions on how to conduct yourself in Japan can be answered based on universal standards. As much as there is the hype of the Japanese traditionally hiding their heart and stuff, in the end it's just a more stylized version of how one would conduct oneself in any modern society. Japan isn't some special unique country: It's a country having a culture made by humans, and as such it can't deviate into some alien world in today's cosmopolitan age.
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Old 2012-02-28, 14:39   Link #2268
Vexx
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Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
I wish to state this: At least half of the questions on how to conduct yourself in Japan can be answered based on universal standards. As much as there is the hype of the Japanese traditionally hiding their heart and stuff, in the end it's just a more stylized version of how one would conduct oneself in any modern society. Japan isn't some special unique country: It's a country having a culture made by humans, and as such it can't deviate into some alien world in today's cosmopolitan age.
I often joke that all one has to do really is behave the way etiquette demanded of us (Americans, etc) just a couple of decades ago in the US. Be nice, don't embarrass people around you. Say please and thank you. Don't be loud. Not mysterious at all. Average Japanese *knows* you're a foreigner so they'll usually appreciate anything you can do to make them feel more comfortable in your zone.
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Old 2012-02-28, 18:08   Link #2269
aohige
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Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
I imagine "daisuki". "Aishiteru" is just too strong a word in my opinion.
No.

Shinji is correct.
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Old 2012-02-28, 20:16   Link #2270
bhl88
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まあそれはそれでからかい甲斐があるがな <- is this informal or archaic?

The only thing I got here was: Well, the teasing was worth it (or something).
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Old 2012-02-28, 20:39   Link #2271
risingstar3110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinji01 View Post
Mother – Aishiteru or Daisuki. But aishiteru would only be when she really is trying to tell the child that he/she is loved. Otherwise on a daily manner it would be daisuki.

Teacher - Daisuki.

Aunt - Daisuki

But to be honest, I cant imagine that conversation happening in a Japanese setting too much. Usually we don’t express our feelings verbally. Maybe to a young child, but not when you get to a certain age.. maybe up until the child is 9 to 10 ish…?

Would love to hear other people’s opinion on this one though 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
I imagine "daisuki". "Aishiteru" is just too strong a word in my opinion.
Heya thank.

Yeah i can image that would not be daily thing, and won't be used much after certain ages. I means , jokingly put it, universally every parent is more or less tsundere toward their children...
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhl88 View Post
まあそれはそれでからかい甲斐があるがな <- is this informal or archaic?

The only thing I got here was: Well, the teasing was worth it (or something).
Probably should be in Japanese language thread, but I want to know about this too. I thought it's just an alternative of 'kana'?

Edit:
Actually a question as well. Is the obon festival and the word bonfire in English have the same origin? Did the term obon exist much earlier than Western arrival to Japan?
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Last edited by risingstar3110; 2012-02-28 at 21:26.
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Old 2012-02-28, 22:16   Link #2272
Sumeragi
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Nope. The "bon" is 盆, the shorten form of Ullambana (于蘭盆會 or 盂蘭盆會). It means "great suffering", and so the festival is to ameliorate the suffering of the "Urabanna" while remembering and appreciating ancestors and their sacrifices.
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Old 2012-02-28, 22:44   Link #2273
Vexx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Nope. The "bon" is 盆, the shorten form of Ullambana (于蘭盆會 or 盂蘭盆會). It means "great suffering", and so the festival is to ameliorate the suffering of the "Urabanna" while remembering and appreciating ancestors and their sacrifices.
And to add to Sumeragi's post:

The modern word "bonfire"
[Middle English bonnefire : bon, bone; see bone + fir, fire; see fire.] bonfire [ˈbɒnˌfaɪə].

Obon is far older than the "english incursion" into Japanese linguistics.
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Old 2012-02-28, 23:03   Link #2274
risingstar3110
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Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Nope. The "bon" is 盆, the shorten form of Ullambana (于蘭盆會 or 盂蘭盆會). It means "great suffering", and so the festival is to ameliorate the suffering of the "Urabanna" while remembering and appreciating ancestors and their sacrifices.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
And to add to Sumeragi's post:

The modern word "bonfire"
[Middle English bonnefire : bon, bone; see bone + fir, fire; see fire.] bonfire [ˈbɒnˌfaɪə].

Obon is far older than the "english incursion" into Japanese linguistics.
Just to show that there are lots of coincidences in language, i guess
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Old 2012-02-28, 23:16   Link #2275
Sumeragi
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Originally Posted by risingstar3110 View Post
Just to show that there are lots of coincidences in language, i guess
I don't get the connection at all. How is a festival honoring the dead connected in any way to a controlled outdoor fire used for informal disposal of burnable waste material or as part of a celebration?
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Old 2012-02-28, 23:16   Link #2276
Vexx
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Originally Posted by risingstar3110 View Post
Just to show that there are lots of coincidences in language, i guess
Its interesting to look at the trans-linguistics of the word for "tea" in half the world.
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Old 2012-02-29, 12:03   Link #2277
risingstar3110
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Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
I don't get the connection at all. How is a festival honoring the dead connected in any way to a controlled outdoor fire used for informal disposal of burnable waste material or as part of a celebration?
Well there are lots of bonfire during the festival to start with, 五山送り火 for example...

It could be the case of "hey, don't you think 'Buddhism Festival for honoring the dead' too mouthful, how about just call it Bon + O, since there are lots of bonfire anyway"
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
Its interesting to look at the trans-linguistics of the word for "tea" in half the world.
Do tell.

I know lots of country, include Japan calls it cha through
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Old 2012-02-29, 12:44   Link #2278
Sumeragi
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Originally Posted by risingstar3110 View Post
Well there are lots of bonfire during the festival to start with, 五山送り火 for example...

It could be the case of "hey, don't you think 'Buddhism Festival for honoring the dead' too mouthful, how about just call it Bon + O, since there are lots of bonfire anyway"
1. Bonfires are 焚き火, takibi. Long way from being connected to bonfire.

2. 盆 is pronounced bon in Japanese, bun in Korean, pen in Mandarian, and pun in Cantonese.


Quote:
Originally Posted by risingstar3110 View Post
I know lots of country, include Japan calls it cha through
That comes from the reading of the character for tea, 茶.
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Old 2012-03-01, 00:00   Link #2279
NoemiChan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by risingstar3110 View Post

I know lots of country, include Japan calls it cha through

In the Philippines, we call it "Tsa-a". Tsa sounds like "cha" too.
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Old 2012-03-02, 20:22   Link #2280
Mystique
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Happy Girls Day!
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The Japanese Doll Festival (雛祭り Hina-matsuri?), or Girls' Day, is held on March 3.[1] Platforms covered with a red carpet are used to display a set of ornamental dolls (雛人形 hina-ningyō?) representing the Emperor, Empress, attendants, and musicians in traditional court dress of the Heian period.
Click to read more, you can use the wiki link that explains the dolls at each level to analyse my pressie here

Spoiler for Dolls!:
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