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Old 2012-03-20, 18:30   Link #21
Sumeragi
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Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Dai Korai Teikoku
Quote:
Originally Posted by MakubeX2 View Post
How many other people do you know, especially one who is fluent in English and knows how how the system works, had survived Yakuza threats and attacks first hand and lives to tell about it in a book ?
Yes, but what does that have to do with the old Yakuza, most of which were concentrated in Western Japan? Traditionally the eastern Yakuza were considered of a lesser caliber.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MakubeX2 View Post
Tadamasa Goto betrayed his own organisation to the FBI in order to save his own life. How's that for honour ?
You mean the damn hustler who became all the more corrupted following the merge with a Tokyo clan, and is now probably doing the same in Kyushu with the Kyushu Seido-kai?

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Originally Posted by MakubeX2 View Post
Why then did they choose to harm the society they were sworn to protect ?
Blame PRC's massive crackdown on foreign dealers of drugs, with the rising use of drugs after the bubble burst. In a sense, the Yakuza are supplying the demand that was already there, taking over from the smaller and less secure dealers. Not that this is a moral thing even by Yakuza standards.

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Originally Posted by MakubeX2 View Post
You know, if the Yakuza today targets an individual, that individual's friends and family suffers first before the Yakuza kills that individual. From my view, the Yakuza of old will go directly for their target, without involving anyone else.
Yes, and such non-traditional methods have caused backlashes which are slowly crushing the entire underworld.
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Old 2012-03-20, 19:08   Link #22
MakubeX2
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Join Date: Oct 2004
Age: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Yes, but what does that have to do with the old Yakuza, most of which were concentrated in Western Japan? Traditionally the eastern Yakuza were considered of a lesser caliber.
You mentioned you are not a fan of Adelstein, who can be considered a trustworthy source of the inner workings of the Yakuza, given his background and experience. So I'm just asking for some alternatives.

But the fact remains that the Yakuza is changing, if they had not already been given the fact that how a man like Goto can helmed a branch of an influential faction of the Yakuza, betray them and still lives to take leadership of another.

In sum, it's best not to trust any modern day romanticized portrayal of the Japanese mob in mainstream media.
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Old 2012-03-20, 19:48   Link #23
Sumeragi
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Join Date: Nov 2010
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I have not dismissed Adelstein as a trustworthy source when it comes to the post-burst Yakuza. With that I have all the respect for him, especially with his having to deal with the Goto-gumi. Yet, his dealings are almost exclusively with the Tokyo Yakuza, who are not known to be the most honorable unless they're made up of minorities like the Toa-kai.

There are certainly changes, yes, but at the same time some parts never changed. One thing for certain is that we cannot tar all of the underworld with a single label. The economical crisis, changing demographics, and new forms of semi-criminal activities have led many to deviate from tradition. Nevertheless, there are those that stick to the original standards of honor and loyalty.

To be frank, this might be because I'm actually used to them when I was living in Kyoto. Never had direct dealings, but I certainly seem to have had more cordial experiences than Mr. Adelstein.
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Old 2014-03-06, 09:28   Link #24
TinyRedLeaf
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 39
Membership of Japan's yakuza crime gangs falls to all-time low
Quote:
Tokyo (March 6, Thu): The number of people belonging to Japan's notorious yakuza crime groups fell to an all-time low last year, slipping below the 60,000-member mark for the first time on record, police say.

The National Police Agency credited its crackdown on the organised crime syndicates for membership falling to 58,600 last year, down from about 63,200 in 2012.

Experts said tougher policing, an increasingly poor public image and a slowing economy have made the lives of Japan's gangsters difficult, and made membership less attractive for potential recruits.

The Japanese media have also reported that stronger laws in recent decades have also made it tough for mobsters to raise money for their operations, and even pushed some senior members to leave their organisations.

According to Japan's police agency, the Yamaguchi-gumi, Japan's biggest crime group, lost 2,000 members from a year earlier with 25,700 gangsters on staff last year.

Its rival group the Sumiyoshi-kai, with 9,500 members, lost 1,100 members from a year before.

AFP
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