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Old 2012-04-27, 11:24   Link #21
TinyRedLeaf
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Originally Posted by Guardian Enzo View Post
But I don't think it's fair to say Hourou Musko fails miserably at showing the hell LGBT kids go through because I don't think it's trying to do that... I don't think the series should be harshly rebuked for not doing something it makes no pretense at attempting.
That's my beef with Hourou Musuko. What was it attempting, to be sure? To paint a happily-ever-after fantasy for a situation that is very far from happy in real life? I'm with synaesthetic on this one. The show presents a nice, feel-good story. No doubt about that. But this is the OP's request:
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I am doing a graduation thesis on Japanese gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgendered language and want to include some references of gendered speech patterns from anime and manga. I want to discover whether gay characters use feminine language, lesbians use masculine language, etc.
First of all, there wasn't any particularly "special" about speech patterns in Hourou Musuko. At least, very little that was reflected in the subtitles. Secondly, as james0246 pointed out, anime just isn't the best place to get a "real" look into what essentially remains a very sensitive topic in Japanese society. The OP is better served by looking for material in live-action shows, in my opinion, if he or she wants to find something substantial for a thesis.
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Old 2012-04-27, 13:09   Link #22
Forsaken_Infinity
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Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
First of all, there wasn't any particularly "special" about speech patterns in Hourou Musuko. At least, very little that was reflected in the subtitles. Secondly, as james0246 pointed out, anime just isn't the best place to get a "real" look into what essentially remains a very sensitive topic in Japanese society. The OP is better served by looking for material in live-action shows, in my opinion, if he or she wants to find something substantial for a thesis.
I disagree with your last point. Anime, and all other pop fiction, say volumes about the prevalent attitudes in a society at a point in time. Sure they don't talk about sensitive topics directly but sensitive topics are better represented with subtlety and popular opinion is much more profoundly expressed when it's said under a mask than when there is a code of honor to fake. It may not feel that way today, but all pop fiction of present day and time will be valuable archaeological evidence in the future to draw inferences about pretty much everything.
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Old 2012-04-28, 00:34   Link #23
james0246
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Originally Posted by Forsaken_Infinity View Post
I disagree with your last point. Anime, and all other pop fiction, say volumes about the prevalent attitudes in a society at a point in time. Sure they don't talk about sensitive topics directly but sensitive topics are better represented with subtlety and popular opinion is much more profoundly expressed when it's said under a mask than when there is a code of honor to fake. It may not feel that way today, but all pop fiction of present day and time will be valuable archaeological evidence in the future to draw inferences about pretty much everything.
I disagree, at least for anime, for two simple reasons: it costs too much and requires too much time to create an anime that isn't "viewer-friendly".

Anyone from any walk of life can pick up a camera and create a story based on their own experiences. Whether the story is interesting, or the subsequent film has any worth, is debatable, but the ease in which such a story can be created and told is quite amazing. Anime, though, requires so much time and effort, that it is quite hard to create something that hasn't been whitewashed. Animation can certainly reflect and explore realistic themes and stories, but the process involved in the creation of the anime requires that the product can be sold.

Consequently, an animated version of, say, Boys Don't Cry (which has a truer sense of "language" than any of the anime listed in this thread so far), has never been made, and probably never will be made (at least not by a studio). Which is why I said that focus on a live-action film would garner a greater pool of examples to be analyzed (the New Half movement, for instance, has created some very interesting films in the last few years).

Manga, though, can showcase these themes and actually explore the "language" of an LGBT individual. Whether such a manga has been made is beyond me (I tend to think that there has to be a mangaka out there, probably a LGBT individual/friend, who has made such a manga).

That being said, New York New York (a manga about an American police officer who hides his sexuality until he meets a special man) does have some depth to its story (though I've only read the first volume).

Last edited by james0246; 2012-04-28 at 00:45.
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