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Old 2012-04-10, 02:34   Link #2321
Nerroth
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
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I was doing some digging about the Ainu online, and I found this very interesting piece from 2010; done for Al-Jazeera English's 101 East program:

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Old 2012-04-20, 15:31   Link #2322
MrTerrorist
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Confessions of an American Hostess: Getting Paid to Drink with Men

Please Don’t Aim Games about Hostess Clubs at Kids!
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Old 2012-04-20, 15:49   Link #2323
Terrestrial Dream
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Anyone seen the movie Nobody Knows (Dare mo shiranai)? Been watching in class recently, it is very depressing but interesting movie. The film reflect on some of the social problems in Japan (even though the event in the movie was based on was from 1988). Even thought the film came out eight years ago it seem to have strong relevance even today, especially after the earthquake in March.
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Old 2012-04-21, 12:29   Link #2324
ChainLegacy
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Join Date: Feb 2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nerroth View Post
I was doing some digging about the Ainu online, and I found this very interesting piece from 2010; done for Al-Jazeera English's 101 East program:

What a fascinating people. The Japanese archipelago houses two very different yet equally compelling cultures.

I find it disheartening the level of knowledge presented by the Japanese surveyed, but am not surprised. I doubt many in my hometown could name the natives who once lived here either (though the time scale is different).
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Old 2012-04-21, 20:39   Link #2325
Nerroth
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Originally Posted by ChainLegacy View Post
What a fascinating people. The Japanese archipelago houses two very different yet equally compelling cultures.
More, if you count the likes of the Ryukyuans and the zainichi Koreans and Chinese. (Nagasaki has had Chinese enclaves for centuries; even during the Edo period, there was one not far from the Dutch outpost at Dejima.)
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Old 2012-04-25, 06:19   Link #2326
Merilyn Mensola
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I don't know if this is the right thread..but i found this pics..and i think this pics are really awesome


Japanese awesome restaurants













Awesome...i want to buy a Home in Japan..in Tokyo
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Old 2012-04-30, 13:10   Link #2327
asaqe
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While maybe this belongs in music more, one thing I found interesting is the rumor about that Japanese idol/music culture is very segegrated. Meaning Female Pop Idols does not do collab with male pop idols. How true is that statement.

Here is a few korean examples from way back, this is kind of related since if an AKB48 member does something like a collab with some well off pop group, she could get in trouble.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gV4Qi...eature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_YM2F...eature=related
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Old 2012-04-30, 13:17   Link #2328
NoemiChan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merilyn Mensola View Post
They surely captured the taste of their customers.
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Old 2012-05-01, 12:38   Link #2329
TinyRedLeaf
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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It's a few days old, but since no one brought it up, I'll add the story here, where it belongs.

Ageing Japanese town bets on young mayor
Quote:
Yubari, Hokkaido (April 26, Thu): Most young people have already fled this city of empty streets and shuttered schools, whose bankrupt local government collapsed under the twin burdens of debt and demographics that are slowly afflicting the rest of Japan.

Now, Yubari, a former coal-mining town on Japan's northernmost main island, Hokkaido, is hoping an unlikely saviour can reverse its long decline: a 31-year-old rookie mayor who has come to symbolise the struggle confronting young Japanese in the world's most greying and indebted nation.

"Japan will tread the same path someday," said Mr Naomichi Suzuki, who a year ago this month became the youngest mayor of the country's most rapidly ageing city. "If we can't save Yubari, what will it mean for the rest of Japan?"

In Yubari, Japan's demographic and fiscal demise is on fast-forward. The city's population has plunged by 90 per cent since its heyday as a coal-mining hub in the 1950s and '60s. Currently, fewer than 10,500 people live in a geographic area approximately the size of New York City. And of those remaining Yubari residents, nearly half are older than 65.

Yubari has also faced its day of reckoning with creditors. Crippled by the closure of its coal mines as Japan moved to petroleum-based fuels and nuclear power, and after a failed bid to revive its tourism economy with subsidies from the central government, Yubari went bankrupt in 2007, owing more than US$400 million to holders of its municipal bonds.

Under Japanese law, that debt must still be repaid under a bankruptcy reorganisation the city will be labouring under for the next 15 years.

Dispatched from Tokyo
The city's services have been cut to the bone, and the public work force of about 300 has been cut by half. Its public bath has been closed and its six elementary schools consolidated into one. The aftermath of the March tsunami last year further decimated local tourism.

It was into these depths of despair that Mr Suzuki, then a 26-year-old public servant in the city of Tokyo's social-welfare department, was dispatched to Yubari on a year-long loan from the Tokyo Metropolitan Government.

He quickly established rapport with the locals, volunteering his free time to help resuscitate the city's annual film festival and checking in regularly with his elderly neighbours.

He began a door-to-door survey to get a better grasp of how the city's cuts were affecting living standards. He also pushed for the city to set up regular three-way meetings with the central government and the prefecture of Hokkaido, to discuss Yubari's debt repayments.

In late 2010, eight months after Mr Suzuki returned to his old job with the Tokyo government, a group of Yubari locals called on him with a bold request: Come back to the city, and run for mayor.

Mr Suzuki was politically untested and a relative unknown. But something remarkable happened in a country usually dominated by the elderly: the incumbent mayor, Mr Hajime Fujikura, a 70-year-old former car-industry executive, declared he would step aside and settle for a city-council seat.

"Look, our children and grandchildren have all left Yubari, but Mr Suzuki came all the way from Tokyo to try to save us," said Mr Fujikura. "If we seniors don't support him, who will?"

Emboldened, Mr Suzuki's camp unleashed a campaign blitz. Trudging through the heavy snow and flashing his winning smile, Mr Suzuki visited more than 5,000 of the city's 6,000-plus households, laying down his message: Yubari can be saved.

Tokyo Governor Shintaro Ishihara even flew to Yubari to cheer on his former employee.

A record voter turnout produced a landslide victory for Mr Suzuki over Ms Yukari Iijima, 46, a former national parliamentarian.

Hard times
In his first year, Mr Suzuki moved swiftly, abolishing the post of vice-mayor and putting the resultant savings on salary towards medical care for the city's infants. He is moving to sell off some of the city's bad investments.

He is also making his share of sacrifices for Yubari: Mr Suzuki is not only Japan's youngest mayor, but also thought to be its lowest-paid. His annual salary of 3.74 million yen (about US$46,000) is a third less than what he was making in Tokyo and lower than some first-year salaries there.

Mr Suzuki and Manami, his wife of 11 months, have registered their marriage at city hall, but are unsure when they can afford a wedding. "Both Yubari and I have a mountain of debt," he joked.

"In many ways, it's not my generation's fault that Japan has so much debt," he said. "But blaming others won't get us anywhere. We just need to find a way forward. It's the responsibility of all of us born into this age."

NEW YORK TIMES
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Old 2012-05-01, 13:28   Link #2330
Guernsey
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So what book, tales or stories are taught in Literature classes in Japan? I know in the West we got books like Lord of the Flies, Catcher in theRye, To Kill a Mockngbird, etc are in the US but what cultural stories are read in Japan?
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Old 2012-05-01, 15:27   Link #2331
Endless Soul
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I wasn't really sure where to post this, here in the Japanese Culture thread or the Japanese Point of View of Western Culture thread, so I guess I'll post it here. If it needs to be moved, please do so.

I found this site which contains a report from the U.S. Intelligence Bulletin, March 1943. It contains translated observations of U.S. military as noted by the Japanese around the time of Guadalcanal.

JAPANESE IMPRESSIONS OF U.S. WARFARE

and

JAPANESE ESTIMATE OF U.S. LAND TACTICS

One thing that caught my eye was this:

Quote:
b. He is fond of using hand grenades, and fires and throws them at close range.
and...

Quote:
b. They are skilled in the use of hand grenades.
This got me to thinking about how every American kid at the time grew up throwing things such as baseballs, pigskins, and the occasional basketball, so using hand grenades with accuracy probably came natural to most of the U.S. soldiers at the time.

Some of the other observations seemed rather contradictory, and has been noted so in the second document.

This was the other thing that caught my eye:

Quote:
A great many motor vehicles are included in the organization of the U. S. forces, who are thoroughly experienced in using them. They plan strategic and tactical actions with them that are unthought of by us
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Old 2012-05-01, 17:43   Link #2332
Vexx
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Also guns..... almost every American soldier came already familiar with the use, cleaning, and handling of firearms.

And we had team sports that trained all those soldiers in how to interact as a team.

I used to play a tabletop game called Squad Leader (Avalon Hill) that did a fair job of simulating the general behaviors of the various forces in WW2. Americans ride everywhere, they use and discard vehicles like candy. The morale may break quickly in a surprise but they recover independently and regroup faster.
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Old 2012-05-02, 09:11   Link #2333
TinyRedLeaf
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
And we had team sports that trained all those soldiers in how to interact as a team.
This played out in other interesting ways. People today often associate the Japanese with team spirit and esprit de corps, so it can come as a surprise to many to read that Japanese fighter combat in World War II emphasised one-on-one dogfighting tactics, in keeping with the battle traditions of the samurai. In contrast, United States tactics focused on teamwork, theoretically because of the American tradition of team sports. This doctrinal difference is further reflected in the design of fighter aircraft on both sides, with the Japanese favouring firepower, range and manoeuvrability, while the Americans tapped on technology and tactics to keep pilots alive as long as possible. (That is, Zerg vs Marines. Literally.) Machines can be replaced. Skilled pilots, once lost, are gone forever, as the Japanese would eventually realise much too late.

For me, the interesting points were:
(1)
Quote:
The enemy does not pay much attention to hand-to-hand fighting.
Quote:
The Americans make much of firepower, especially the power of artillery, and lay only small stress on bayonet assaults.
We are so used to the fire-and-movement tactics of modern combat that we forget that bayonets were once considered highly necessary weapons. It used to be that once a company had expended its rounds to soften a target, its soldiers would fix bayonets before making the final charge to finish off a stricken enemy.

Such small-unit tactics were still considered valid as recently as during my own time as an infantry officer cadet, about 20 years ago. It's the poor bloody infantry's job to take and hold ground and, in the past, it was assumed that this would necessarily mean fighting tooth and nail to dislodge enemies from fortified positions.

Even so, bayonet tactics were already falling out of favour by the time of World War I. That the Japanese still placed emphasis on it illustrated the growing obsolescence of their infantry tactics.

(2)
Quote:
What Japanese staff officers think of the land warfare tactics used by U.S. forces is set forth in an official Japanese document. These beliefs indicate clearly why the Japs have specialized in infiltrating, surprise, and deceptive tactics to such a great extent against our forces.
I couldn't help but smile, because that one paragraph encapsulates a fundamental aspect of the Chinese/Japanese art of war. For the Chinese and the Japanese, warfare is all about deception. Both cultures are replete with legends of brilliant generals who outmanoeuvred opponents through trickery, and the very best commanders are those who achieve victory with minimal losses.

That's not to say Western commanders don't know the value of espionage and deception, as the likes of Erwin "Desert Fox" Rommel would amply show. But, doctrinally, it's true that Western tactics typically favour sheer firepower over feints and manoeuvres. Hence the emphasis on grenades and artillery.

In fact, I note wryly that American military doctrine, as observed by the Japanese, would still have been familiar to me and my fellow cadets 20 years ago. The approach to defence and assault is fundamentally the same, despite a time gap of 50-plus years.

In defence, dig in and prepare for a pounding. Though it's never explicitly said, the unspoken assumption is that if you're tasked to hold ground, you're as good as fucked, so you might as well prepare for the worst. Yes, don't bother to counter-attack — you're not likely to be in any shape to do so after enduring just one assault (assuming you're still alive, that is).

If you wonder why such an assumption exists, do try to experience an artillery live-firing exercise at first hand, if you ever get such an opportunity. The closest I got was for the live firing of a battery of now-decommissioned 106mm jeep-mounted recoilless rifles. Standing on a forward observation post, I could still feel my legs turning to jelly from the force of impact as the shells landed several kilometres away.

Now imagine if you were at ground zero... It's game over, man. Game over.

Last edited by TinyRedLeaf; 2012-05-02 at 10:00. Reason: Spelling...
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Old 2012-05-02, 09:29   Link #2334
Dhomochevsky
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To me, this sounds like the japanese army was still using a WWI doctrine, with frontal assaults on fortified positions leading to close combat and counterattacks after those assaults.
That's typical WWI trench warfare.
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Old 2012-05-02, 10:07   Link #2335
NoemiChan
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I find this funny

2. U.S. BATTLEFIELD TACTICS

c. The enemy's fighting spirit is unexpectedly intense. He does not retreat in single-firing combat. However, when charged, he will flee.

The following is our estimate of American strength and capabilities:

d. In defense, they never counterattack and never carry out an offensive.

f. They know nothing of assault. We should assault whenever possible. Fifty yards is often the best distance for assault.

These resulted to many Japanese casualties during WWII
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Old 2012-05-02, 10:13   Link #2336
SaintessHeart
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One note : the US battlefield doctrine has been based on chaos - their soldiers, since the 1900s, seemed to be trained in split second decision making, regardless of the initial command.

The best plan for them? It's to have no plan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
Even so, bayonet tactics were already falling out of favour by the time of World War I. That the Japanese still placed emphasis on it illustrated the growing obsolescence of their infantry tactics.
Never underestimate the usefulness of the bayonet in urban warfare. Gut that poor bastard round the corner who's trying to get on top then rape you.

The interesting thing to note, is that the shock value of the bayonet charge puts anyone out of commssion - they are more likely to fire more rapidly; wasting ammunition, or fumble upon their reload drills.

Except for the MG crew.
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Last edited by SaintessHeart; 2012-05-02 at 10:34.
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Old 2012-05-02, 10:43   Link #2337
TinyRedLeaf
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Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
The best plan for them? It's to have no plan.
If there's no plan, you might as well curl up and die. There's always a plan. Whether it is well-articulated and well-executed, though, is another matter.

Quote:
...American tactical ideas are simple...
Quote:
...the character of the American is simple...
Quote:
They simply make broad plans for combating enemy attacks against their fortified positions...
Quote:
...Americans are unlike our troops, who can attack at night and bring about decisive results; instead, they simply use the night hours to better their preparations...
It's here that the Japanese made a fatal error in judgment, partly because of their different doctrine, and partly because of sheer arrogance.

The truth is that simple plans are the best, because they are easy to explain, easy to execute and, most importantly, easy to adapt on the fly.

I speak from personal experience: first as a gawky cadet planning and executing my first mission (major fail; mission plan was so complicated and garbled I couldn't even remember parts of it en route to objective) and subsequently, many years later, as an older, more experienced reservist officer (conduct 'O' group, give mission statement, identify key objectives, lay out plans of action, obtain buy in [critical]).

The non-commissioned ranks don't need the "bigger picture". They just need the objective and the timings, which an officer is supposed to provide. Smooth execution will depend on pre-rehearsed drills, but within the framework of the plan, there should be enough room for each soldier, or at the very least the section leaders, to exercise initiative. The mission is supposed to be carried out through familiar routines in the first place. If it doesn't even start that way, something is seriously wrong.

That's the ideal situation. How close any unit is to the ideal depends, of course, on individual personalities. American doctrine can't be very different.
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Old 2012-05-02, 11:06   Link #2338
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
If there's no plan, you might as well curl up and die. There's always a plan. Whether it is well-articulated and well-executed, though, is another matter.
What I meant was : just give the objective, and by when. Those people working in special forces, for some reason, prefer it this way - an old bird once told me that since nobody knows anything, the special forces are sent in first, either as reconnaisance, or to buy time while commanders figure out what to do.

Usually the objective always include "Return safely" at the end; if a SOF team doesn't return, usually everyone else back home is fcked.

Quote:
It's here that the Japanese made a fatal error in judgment, partly because of their different doctrine, and partly because of sheer arrogance.

The truth is that simple plans are the best, because they are easy to explain, easy to execute and, most importantly, easy to adapt on the fly.

I speak from personal experience: first as a gawky cadet planning and executing my first mission (major fail; mission plan was so complicated and garbled I couldn't even remember parts of it en route to objective) and subsequently, many years later, as an older, more experienced reservist officer (conduct 'O' group, give mission statement, identify key objectives, lay out plans of action, obtain buy in [critical]).

The non-commissioned ranks don't need the "bigger picture". They just need the objective and the timings, which an officer is supposed to provide. Smooth execution will depend on pre-rehearsed drills, but within the framework of the plan, there should be enough room for each soldier, or at the very least the section leaders, to exercise initiative. The mission is supposed to be carried out through familiar routines in the first place. If it doesn't even start that way, something is seriously wrong.

That's the ideal situation. How close any unit is to the ideal depends, of course, on individual personalities. American doctrine can't be very different.
I admit, I have little or no idea how infantry command and tactics work other than the standard combat drills conducted by grunts. Though the way the Japanese snipers operate gave me the impression that they are horrendous at ground-level intelligence operations - the operator must first return in order to be able inform, and secondly, tying themselves to the top of the tree breaks the entire predator-prey cycle - which is the primary operating rationale for sniper/recon forces. It is about maintaining the predator position as many times during the engagement as possible - when the enemy starts looking, you are the prey; and the prey always gets eaten by the predator.

For QRF/SO side, planning is like debugging a complex program - 1 objective, then lots of boolean operators thrown in on the fly as things keep going wrong. OFC, being the first to go in, what can't go wrong?
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Old 2012-05-08, 20:38   Link #2339
Siegel Clyne
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Japanese Pop Cultural References in Videos by Music Artists of Part Japanese Descent

In my earlier posts in this thread, The Japanese Diaspora, Part 1 and The Japanese Diaspora, Part 2, I documented the very high intermarriage rates of present-day Nikkei or Nikkeijin (Japanese immigrants and their descendants) living in the New World (North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean) in the former, and linked to a number of videos on YouTube featuring entertainers and celebrities of mainly mixed Japanese descent from the New World and Europe in the latter.

Using official data and figures from the 2010 U.S. Census, as well as from the 2000 U.S. Census, around 41.5% of the total population of the Japanese ethnic group in the United States is of mixed ancestry.

In other words, almost half of the ethnic Japanese population in the U.S. is only part Japanese.

About 6.0% of the total ethnic Japanese population in the U.S. is a combination of Japanese and other Asian only (Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Hmong, Laotian, Thai, Filipino, Malaysian, Indonesian, Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Sri Lankan, Tibetan, Nepalese, Bhutanese, etc).

The total population of full Japanese descent living in the U.S. ACTUALLY DECREASED from 2000 to 2010, presumably mostly due to deaths of the elderly population.

The majority of the young ethnic Japanese living in the U.S. already appear to be of mixed descent.

It seems that the 2020 U.S. Census will show that the majority of ALL ethnic Japanese living in the U.S. will be of mixed descent.

After intermarriages with whites, the second most common form of intermarriage involving Japanese Americans is with other Asian Americans.

An example is main rapper, songwriter, producer, and frontman for the popular mainstream American electro hop band Far☆East Movement, Kev Nish AKA Kevin Nishimura.

Kev Nish's father is a third-generation Japanese American, or Sansei, while his mother is a third-generation Chinese American.

Kev Nish and a couple of his close friends from downtown Los Angeles, California - lead rapper and songwriter Prohgress AKA James Roh, and rapper and songwriter, J-Splif AKA Jae Choung, both Korean Americans - formed Emcees Anonymous by 2001, but later changed the group's name to Far East Movement. Los Angeles radio station Power 106 DJ, DJ Virman AKA Virman Coquia, a Filipino American, became Far East Movement's official DJ in 2008.

While mixed Asian American music artists (e.g., Puerto Rican/Filipino American Bruno Mars) have topped the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 Charts, Far East Movement became the first (and still only?) All-Asian American group to hit No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 Charts with their song, "Like A G6," in October 2010.

Far East Movement - Like A G6 ft. The Cataracs, DEV

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In their sweet (really bittersweet) 2009 music video "Rocketeer" featuring Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter, record producer and frontman for the pop rock band OneRepublic, Ryan Tedder, there are a few examples of Japanese-style illustration and manga pictures, as well as a Super Mario reference by Kev Nish:

Far East Movement - Rocketeer ft. Ryan Tedder

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Far East Movement's 2011 music video "If I Was You (OMG)" features famous rapper, singer, record producer, and actor, Snoop Dogg:

Far East Movement - If I Was You (OMG) ft Snoop Dogg

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Near the end of Far East Movement's 2012 music video "Jello" featuring rapper, dancer, and actress, Rye Rye, Kev Nish proposes to and kisses - really kisses - an Oprah Winfrey lookalike:

Far East Movement - Jello ft. Rye Rye

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Far East Movement's 2012 music video "Live My Life" featuring YouTube sensation, Justin Bieber, was filmed in Amsterdam, The Netherlands:

Far East Movement - Live My Life ft. Justin Bieber

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Here is the "Party Rock Remix" version of "Live My Life" by Far East Movement featuring Justin Bieber and rapper, singer-songwriter, producer, dancer and DJ, Redfoo, from the electro pop duo LMFAO:

Far East Movement - Live My Life (Party Rock Remix) ft. Justin Bieber & Redfoo

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Far East Movement's new album, DIRTY BASS, is slated to be released "May 22nd around the world and June 5th in the US."

Rising and much critically acclaimed American r&b/pop singer-songwriter Jhené Aiko (born Jhené Aiko Efuru Chilombo in Los Angeles, California) - whose mother, Christina Yamamoto, is half Japanese and half Dominican mulata (mixed black and white {Spanish}), and whose father, Dr. Karamo Chilombo, is part black, part German Jewish, and part Native American - has drawn praise from fellow music artists like rappers Drake and Wiz Khalifa.

Jhené Aiko's 2011 music video, "SNAPPED," which was posted on her official music channel on YouTube, features video clips from the Japanese animation (anime) title Black Lagoon, starring Revy:

Jhene' Aiko's "SNAPPED"

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Jhené's older sister, Mila J, is also a singer. Here are a couple of her music videos from 2006 and 2007, respectively, "Complete" and "Good Lookin' Out" featuring Marques Houston:

Mila J - Complete

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Mila J - "Good Lookin' Out" feat. Marques Houston

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Whatever happened to Mila J?

Many fans say that Mila J and certainly her baby sister Jhené Aiko have a lot more talent than many, if not most, of the singers who are more popular today.

More information and videos featuring Far East Movement and Jhené Aiko, as well as other international entertainers and celebrities of mainly part Japanese ancestry, can be found in my The Japanese Diaspora, Part 2 post which I linked to above. I recently updated that post with a number of new links and more info, including different videos starring the stunningly gorgeous, part Japanese, Uruguayan-born Mexican actress and model Bárbara Mori.

Born to a Japanese-Jamaican mother and a Black American father in New York, Misa Hylton is an American celebrity stylist. "She has created fashions for Mary J. Blige, Kimora Lee Simmons, Chris Rock, Missy Elliot, Lil' Kim, Diddy; Faith Evans and the beat goes on...." She has said that she prefers to work behind the scenes.

While a teenage student in high school, Misa Hylton dated famous American rapper, singer, record producer, actor, and entrepreneur Diddy AKA Sean John Combs, who was an adult at the time.

Misa Hylton.mp4

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Misa Hylton Speaks

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Misa Hylton and Diddy had a son together, Justin Dior Combs. Earlier this year, the 18-year-old Justin accepted a full football scholarship to UCLA. The 5-foot, 9-inch Justin Combs plays defensive back.

Inheriting his mother's good looks and his father's status as a famous celebrity, Justin seems to be have already been quite a heartthrob when he was a younger teenager. Now being an American football jock at a big name, NCAA Division I university should have even more girls throwing themselves at him.

FOX Sports Next: Justin Combs

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Justin Combs SUPER SWEET 16 At M2, 01/23/10-Part 1 of 4-HD

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Justin's younger half sister, Madison Brim, Misa Hylton's daughter with her ex-husband Jojo Brim, is a real cutie:

Top 5 Things That Scare Madison

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Madison does the Cinnamon Challenge

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Japanese America, Japanese Canada, Japanese Mexico, Japanese Brazil, etc., will only increasingly look like - although in the case of intermarriage with most other Asians, they will nor differ very much - the entertainers, celebrities, and their offspring whom I have featured in my posts on this thread.

Last edited by Siegel Clyne; 2012-05-14 at 23:22.
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Old 2012-05-08, 21:31   Link #2340
DonQuigleone
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Age: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
I couldn't help but smile, because that one paragraph encapsulates a fundamental aspect of the Chinese/Japanese art of war. For the Chinese and the Japanese, warfare is all about deception. Both cultures are replete with legends of brilliant generals who outmanoeuvred opponents through trickery, and the very best commanders are those who achieve victory with minimal losses.

That's not to say Western commanders don't know the value of espionage and deception, as the likes of Erwin "Desert Fox" Rommel would amply show. But, doctrinally, it's true that Western tactics typically favour sheer firepower over feints and manoeuvres. Hence the emphasis on grenades and artillery.
Not so sure, I'd say Japan at this time was much more heavily influenced by German and British military doctrine, then anything else, albeit archaic German doctrine. Same goes for China. The whole bayonet charge thing is very WW1esque, as is the lack of motorized vehicles. Part of it is that the terrain the Asian war was fought in was not amenable to the "Blitzkrieg" land tactics developed recently in Europe. The lack of infrastructure and prevalence of difficult terrain meant it was difficult for armour to maneuver and be supplied, likewise there wasn't enough airfields (in central china) for a sustained airwar.

Combine it with the fact that China was still backward at the time, and Japan had little reason to innovate. Likewise, at the start of the war, the Soviets weren't a whole lot better either, and the Japanese did have a dangerous superiority complex compounding it, due to the fact they were undefeated up until that point.

But on the whole for the Japanese officer corps, it was more Clauswitz then Sun Tzu. Same goes for the KMT National Revolutionary Army.

I'd also say that the British and French were also very different from the Americans. They both still used a WW1 approach to warfare, heavily based on infantry supported by armor and artillery, each precisely carrying out their component of a grander plan. The USA not so much.

Since WW2, however, their military doctrines have grown closer together, I'd say the modern US and UK armies work almost identically.
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