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Old 2012-09-19, 11:42   Link #2481
james0246
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I created a new thread for the topic that was being discussed. Please move the discussion to the new thread.
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Old 2012-09-23, 14:54   Link #2482
Siegel Clyne
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Argentine Model/Actress/Singer Eugenia Suárez Affirms Japanese Heritage with Tattoo

María Eugenia Suárez Riveiro (born March 9, 1992 in Buenos Aires), also known as Eugenia Suárez and China Suárez; is an Argentine actress, singer and model. She is the best known for her role of Jaz Romero in the Cris Morena Group series Casi Ángeles and as a member of its group Teen Angels. Suárez is also known for appearing in television series Rincón de Luz, Floricienta and Amor Mío.

Also known affectionately as "Euge," Eugenia Suárez's maternal grandmother was Japanese - something she frequently mentions in interviews and elsewhere.

They call her "China" or "la China" because it is much shorter than "Japonesa" ("Japanese") - but not "Japo" or "Japi."

Eugenia Suárez models shoes in a video ad for Ricky Sarkany, a famous shoe designer in Argentina:

Eugenia Suárez para Ricky Sarkany [Primavera-Verano 2012]
(Eugenia Suárez for Ricky Sarkany [Spring-Summer 2012])

YouTube
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A couple of YouTube viewers commented that Eugenia Suárez, playing Jazmín ("Jaz") Romero in Casi Ángeles (Almost Angels), looks like a real-life Barbie in this video clip:

La Nueva Jazmin Romero
(The New Jazmin Romero)

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Euge certainly has a doll face, doesn't she?

Eugenia Suárez modeling swimsuits and lingerie for Sweet Victorian, a line of lingerie and swimswear in Argentina (I wonder where they find the inspiration for the name?):

Eugenia Suarez [Age 17]

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Maria Eugenia Suarez Sweet Victorian 02 [Age 19]

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Two of the most popular songs sung by Eugenia Suárez as Jazmín Romero from Casi Ángeles are "Reina gitana" ("Gypsy Queen") and "Te perdí ("I Lost You"):

Jazmin- reina gitana
(Jazmin- Gypsy Queen)

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Te perdí - letra
(I Lost You - Lyrics)

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Eugenia Suárez affirms her Japanese heritage with one of three tattoos she got when she was eighteen:

Los tatuajes y piercings de Euge
(The Tattoos and Piercings of Euge {Eugenia Suárez})

YouTube
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The tattoo on Euge's waist on her backside is the Japanese kanji, 福 ("fuku"), which means "good fortune" or "happiness."

The tattoo on Euge's lower neck in the back is in English, "Japanese Blood" ("Sangre japonesa"). Euge has Japanese blood because of her Japanese grandmother (abuela japonesa).

As I have shown here and in my earlier post in this thread, The Japanese Diaspora, Part 2, like Eugenia Suárez a number of Nikkeijin, or Japanese emigrants and their descendants - including entertainers and celebrities of mixed heritage - have visibly affirmed their Japanese roots with tattoos, names, etc.: Uruguayan-born Mexican model/actress Bárbara Mori, her older sister Kenya Mori, her younger brother Kintaro Mori, and her father Yuyi (Yuji) Mori all sport a kanji tattoo for their Japanese family name, Mori (森; "Forest"); American ex-supermodel Kimora Lee Simmons gave her younger daughter a Japanese name, Aoki, and her son a Japanese name, Kenzo; American R&B/pop singer/songwriter Jhené Aiko gave her daughter a Japanese first name, Namiko; and American actor Dean Cain AKA Clark Kent/Superman reportedly has a tattoo on his (left) ankle for his real family name, Tanaka (田中, I presume).

Last edited by Siegel Clyne; 2012-09-25 at 12:33.
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Old 2012-09-25, 09:16   Link #2483
willx
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Business Attire in Japan?

So, while I was getting dressed this morning, I suddenly became curious about this topic. Although I've traveled to Japan somewhat recently for leisure, I have never been there for business. If anyone that works there or has been there for business for an extended period of time could satisfy my curiosity -- I would be very grateful! My only real encounters with Japanese businessmen are:

1) Watching an avalanche/wall of them on the march at Shinagawa station on a Monday morning while I was wearing yoga wear and half asleep trying to get to a Tsukuji fish market
2) A brief business meeting 3-4 years ago with two older gentlemen representing Itochu, but I was more junior then and sat quite a ways away and didn't really speak to them

So my questions are:
1) How much do good quality suits cost? Good quality wool? Made-to-measure? Bespoke?
2) Do people wear french cuffs? Cufflinks? I don't recall seeing any.
3) How much do cheap suits cost? I notice everyone wears suits there, many of them looked ill-fitted and couldn't have cost that much? The cheapest polyester suits here cost ~US$80-100?
4) I heard there was a push (post-earthquake/tsunami) to have people not wear ties to reduce air conditioning costs? True?
5) Conservative business environments here are almost solely the domain of white/blue shirts, sometimes with stripes .. I don pink on Fridays(!) because of Pink Shirt Fridays(tm) -- what's the practice there?
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Old 2012-09-25, 10:40   Link #2484
DonQuigleone
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I once got interviewed by a Japanese company (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries). My impression is that business atire is extremely conservative. Generally they don't wear anything fancy that would stand out (like fancy cufflinks, pink shirts). Likewise, it's all short simple hair styles (possibly the only interview I've ever been to that discussed my hair style...). The trends towards flexible work atire that you see in the US and Europe I don't think has really taken hold in Japan. Business-casual is right out.

One interesting difference in Japan is that in factory environments, on the factory floor white collar workers are expected to wear the same blue overalls as line workers(with the overalls worn over the suit shirt and tie, like this). Generally, Japanese companies are quite keen on group solidarity within a company, rather then the executive/manager/worker split you might see in American companies.

If you're sticking out, or the clothes are tight and showing off your body, you won't do well in Japan. I'd say even a gold watch would be frowned upon. Not really the kind of environment for any self expression, at least where clothing is concerned.
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Old 2012-09-25, 10:52   Link #2485
Metaler
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Kinda had a feeling they wouldn't like my long hair.

The Japanese need to learn how to chill.
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Old 2012-09-25, 11:07   Link #2486
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No, people need to stop thinking they need to stick out.

But that's just me, who is pretty conservative with clothing (I avoid wearing skirts if possible).
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Old 2012-09-25, 11:28   Link #2487
Vexx
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Like in many other things, the japanese could benefit from a bit more flexibility and individuality and we in America could benefit from a bit more formality and communitarianism.

Aieeee, woman ... wear .... pants!!!!!! So out of line!!!! Modern wildness!!!
(When I was in high school, a woman wearing pants would be immediately sent home as it was "indecent". My "top 10 of class" future wife got sent home for just that when she wore pants because they were going to be constructing props for a big school function.)

But yeah, I looked at doing teaching in Japan and before even showing up for interview I went and removed most of my hair. Turned out I was "too old" (42 at the time) and there was "no way" I could connect with teenagers or young adults .... o.O

Took me a year to grow it back, so it goes

Last edited by Vexx; 2012-09-25 at 14:50.
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Old 2012-09-25, 12:06   Link #2488
Ridwan
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Old 2012-09-25, 12:16   Link #2489
Metaler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
Like in many other things, the japanese could benefit from a bit more flexibility and individuality and we in America could benefit from a bit more formality and communitarianism.

Aieeee, woman ... wear .... pants!!!!!! So out of line!!!! Modern wildness!!!
(When I was in high school, a woman wearing pants would be immediately sent home as it was "indecent". My "top 10 of class" future wife got sent home for just that when she wore pants because they were going to be constructing props for a big school function.)

But yeah, I looked at doing teaching in Japan and before even showing up for interview I went and removed most of my hair. Turned out I was "too old" (42 at the time) and there was "no way" I could connect with teenagers or young adults .... o.O
The levels of assholery from the employer must've exceeded the normal human capacity. Jesus Christ.
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Old 2012-09-25, 12:46   Link #2490
Vexx
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Originally Posted by Metaler View Post
The levels of assholery from the employer must've exceeded the normal human capacity. Jesus Christ.
That would be the JET program. They used to prefer people under 35 for that rationale. Maybe they've gotten a clue since then <shrug>.

The point is, you're in a different country with a different set of unspoken rules. Outsiders like me can get away with some difference via the "dancing bear" technique (o look! he can use chopsticks so well! your japanese is so good! you're so tall!) but outsiders can be stressful to even be around (what are the rules with the gaijin???? panic! run!)
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Old 2012-09-25, 13:10   Link #2491
DonQuigleone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaler View Post
The levels of assholery from the employer must've exceeded the normal human capacity. Jesus Christ.
Doesn't surprise me. Japanese employers are ridiculously conservative. None of my experiences have indicated otherwise.

For what it's worth though, a lot less people are employed in the old style organisations then how it used to be. I'd say the smaller employers are probably a lot more flexible.

That said, the Japanese corporate philosophy is not all bad. Japanese employers do tend to look after their workers, and workers tend to work for their companies out of more then simple greed. Usually there is a real commitment to making quality products for their customers, that is often lacking in American companies, where it's more about "what's in it for me?" Though in the last 30 years we've had a case where most American manufacturers have taken on many key points behind Japanese corporate governance.

Last edited by DonQuigleone; 2012-09-25 at 13:20.
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Old 2012-09-25, 13:26   Link #2492
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Originally Posted by Metaler View Post
Kinda had a feeling they wouldn't like my long hair.

The Japanese need to learn how to chill.
What, sorta like half of America needs to chill with the bible thumping culture?

See, anyone can play that game.
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Old 2012-09-25, 14:17   Link #2493
DonQuigleone
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Originally Posted by aohige View Post
What, sorta like half of America needs to chill with the bible thumping culture?

See, anyone can play that game.
You could also reasonably say that Americans are too obsessed with their appearance and vain "self-expression".
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Old 2012-09-25, 14:51   Link #2494
willx
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Hm.. My question was more related to cost and accessibility of business attire and general practices, definitely not a comparison to what is or isn't acceptable or good/bad..

But now that we've gone there...

I work in a very conservative work environment by North American standards, but even then I can wear pink shirts on Fridays and my lawyer friend wears socks with cartoons on them. Cufflinks are considered classy here. Pocket squares more so. Plastic buttons are mostly worn by more junior people and middle office staff. Or on hot days when you fold up your sleeves and when you're definitely not seeing clients.

As for "sticking out" .. it's incredibly important here. You don't stick out (at least in positive ways) and you don't get promoted and you don't make the six figure salary. It's the only way you get ahead. I speak my mind to my boss and if something is dumb or pointless? I say so. If I notice something I feel is important? I say so. I have been told outright personality is important. Have a view. Be able to back the view up, but have a view and don't vacillate. It's the only way to climb the socio-economic ladder..

I'm used to working crazy hours and don't mind that .. but I don't deal well with not speaking my mind -- I'd probably get fired working in most companies in Japan eh, Sumeragi?
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Old 2012-09-25, 15:30   Link #2495
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willx View Post
Hm.. My question was more related to cost and accessibility of business attire and general practices, definitely not a comparison to what is or isn't acceptable or good/bad..

But now that we've gone there...

I work in a very conservative work environment by North American standards, but even then I can wear pink shirts on Fridays and my lawyer friend wears socks with cartoons on them. Cufflinks are considered classy here. Pocket squares more so. Plastic buttons are mostly worn by more junior people and middle office staff. Or on hot days when you fold up your sleeves and when you're definitely not seeing clients.

As for "sticking out" .. it's incredibly important here. You don't stick out (at least in positive ways) and you don't get promoted and you don't make the six figure salary. It's the only way you get ahead. I speak my mind to my boss and if something is dumb or pointless? I say so. If I notice something I feel is important? I say so. I have been told outright personality is important. Have a view. Be able to back the view up, but have a view and don't vacillate. It's the only way to climb the socio-economic ladder..

I'm used to working crazy hours and don't mind that .. but I don't deal well with not speaking my mind -- I'd probably get fired working in most companies in Japan eh, Sumeragi?
Conversely, although I work in a small office, the dress code here is very relaxed. Right now I'm wearing a screen T-shirt, jeans and sneakers. They pretty much draw the line at shorts, and even though I'm in Southern California, I wouldn't really want to wear shorts to an office environment anyways.

The girls here often wear capris and sandals!

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Old 2012-09-25, 15:31   Link #2496
Metaler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aohige View Post
What, sorta like half of America needs to chill with the bible thumping culture?

See, anyone can play that game.
I'm not defending American culture or anything. I'm just saying they gotta chill, take it easy.

Though to be quite fair, from what I know of Japanese Culture (and I admit it's not much), I can't really respect it. Way too conservative and organized for my tastes.
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Old 2012-09-25, 15:46   Link #2497
DonQuigleone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willx View Post
As for "sticking out" .. it's incredibly important here. You don't stick out (at least in positive ways) and you don't get promoted and you don't make the six figure salary. It's the only way you get ahead. I speak my mind to my boss and if something is dumb or pointless? I say so. If I notice something I feel is important? I say so. I have been told outright personality is important. Have a view. Be able to back the view up, but have a view and don't vacillate. It's the only way to climb the socio-economic ladder..

I'm used to working crazy hours and don't mind that .. but I don't deal well with not speaking my mind -- I'd probably get fired working in most companies in Japan eh, Sumeragi?
I think you misunderstand the thrust of Japanese corporate culture, and why it has been so successful in the past. Japanese companies are not against people speaking their minds (though you do get issues surrounding "face"), after all that's what they're employed to do, they're not employed to be mindless yesmen.

However, they are against ideas of personal aggrandisement. It's not about your greatness. It's about company, and your team's greatness. They want to see you to work first and foremost for the benefit of the company as a whole. The motivation is to see the company (and also your team) be the best it can be, to give the best service it can to it's customers.

In return for your hard work and loyalty, the company will repay you for your hard work and initiative with a good salary and job security. You are the most important resource of the company, and are just as much a part of it as your foreman, or even the CEO. You are not a part to be thrown away as needed.

If the company culture is focused on individual advancement, on not the advancement of the company as a whole, you very easily get the situation where employees have no real loyalty to the company in question, and will do everything they can to improve their position, even if that is to the detriment of the company or their fellow employees.

Japanese companies frown on people going out of their way to stick out because they see it as hot air, and also that it damages the cohesiveness of the group as a whole. It's about substance over style. Japanese employees speak through the quality of their products and services they help deliver, not their own personal style and panache. I think it's about being effective, even if it means you're a little boring.

Their are downsides to this approach, it can result in group-think and other problematic behaviours. I think the flipside of what you're talking about results in some of the excesses you see on wallstreet, with employees primarily motivated towards ever higher personal salaries and bonuses, rather then stepping back and thinking about your organisation as a whole.
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Old 2012-09-25, 16:05   Link #2498
Metaler
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^ I think you just proved why bullying is so hardcore over there.

But yeah, I can understand what they mean when they say that working with the company and its customers in mind is better than just thinking of your own personal achievements. But just because I show up to work with a green shirt instead of the usual blue shirt doesn't mean I'm trying to screw everyone over. It's my own thing.
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Old 2012-09-25, 16:22   Link #2499
Vexx
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If you've ever seen the folks at the JPL mission centers - that's a quick study of the way people dressed in all the jobs I've ever had (places with customers like NASA, Air Force, "other" customers). Not that there wasn't resistance from the "suit/tie" faction. I'm perfectly fine with suit/tie for the right situations - but there are far fewer of those situations than one might think. When the general is there for a formal meeting, sure, dress up. When its majors, colonels, and whatnot? Meh, its goth, hipster, punk, hell's angels, and a few bazingas at the wheel.

To wheel this around back on topic: In JAPAN, you'll find much more openness in the artistic fields both serious and pop. You'll also find more openness at the street and small business level. Corporations, otoh, are descended directly from samurai culture - you're a "soldier" for Mitsubishi, etc. The bad thing is that you used to be an employee for life in exchange for that service. Somewhere in the mid-90s, the corporations started experimenting with the New American Way of treating employees like shit and disposable commodities rather than important assets. The Japanese working forces are starting to respond to that and it isn't in a positive way for the old power clans - imagine that.
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Old 2012-09-25, 16:26   Link #2500
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Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
If you've ever seen the folks at the JPL mission centers - that's a quick study of the way people dressed in all the jobs I've ever had (places with customers like NASA, Air Force, "other" customers). Not that there wasn't resistance from the "suit/tie" faction. I'm perfectly fine with suit/tie for the right situations - but there are far fewer of those situations than one might think. When the general is there for a formal meeting, sure, dress up. When its majors, colonels, and whatnot? Meh, its goth, hipster, punk, hell's angels, and a few bazingas at the wheel.
You do realise that you work with bunny ears lawyers types right?
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