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Old 2012-10-05, 01:44   Link #21
Simonsy
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Join Date: Mar 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irenicus View Post
Yeah but, Intel doesn't want you to future-proof your motherboard. Nehalem didn't work on boards for Core 2, Sandy Bridge didn't work on boards for Nehalem. Ivy Bridge does work on Sandy Bridge boards because it's just a "tick" manufacturing process update, but Haswell will reset the socket again. Basically, no present Intel boards will be "future proof" by this time next year. What you buy is what you get.

You can only "future-proof" things like USB3 capability and SATA 6GB/s and Thunderbolt and stuff.

Also, the OS is on the drive (HD or SSD), not the mobo, but changing your motherboard can indeed be a bit of a pain if the OS is confused by your hardware changes, which the mb being the most likely culprit.

As for power supply, buy quality first is what the experts say. All the wattage numbers mean virtually nothing for them, they look at the power on the 12v rails and all that (though for us laymen the watts' the easiest number to grasp on). Things get even more complicated because companies like to rebrand power supplies and you get confused who actually makes them. I go by the rule, if Seasonic made it (and often some other company rebrands it, sigh), it has at least an 80+ efficiency rating or better, and nobody complains it exploded in their face, it's good.
Yea if you get down to it, but I still stand the the best future proofing you can do is in those 3 regards. And yea i know the OS is on hard-drive, but as you said it often gets tied to the motherboard pretty firmly so when I upgraded my motherboard I could find no way to get it working without a fresh OS.

A good quality, powerful power supply.
A motherboard that has connections that hopefully stay supported for as long as possible.
And of course a case.

Those 3 things can last many computer generations. I go through multiple gfx cards, ram and processors before I switch any of those 3. And the power supply and case are still original.

once you get a good monitor, mouse and keyboard that you are satisfied with that's a few more things that can last generations.


urzu 7. That motherboard I believe is the same one that i got. From what i saw it seems like it should last me for quite some time. Apparantly dvd connectors changed since last i updated that cause I could not connect that to the board, but I need to get a blu ray drive anyway. Only like $50 so no big deal.

your powersupply i'm not familiar with, mine was a corsier 750w. i don't know power supply's really at all so not going to say if good or not, but I'm sure its fine.

I got a coolmaster case, but there are a ton of great ones out there. Just get one that fits a "full" motherboard, cause thats what your getting, plus that is the biggest size so you can fit any smaller one if you ever decide. Also find one that has a good airflow and fan usage. You will spend anywhere from $100-200 prolly on a case.

I think I chose 16 gig ram. The board I got came with 8 gigs on newegg for free, so i just figured i'd buy 8 more. pretty sure i'd not notice anything different if i only had 8, so you'll be fine with just 8. ha just 8, its weird saying 8 is "just" How many years ago 8 would have been inconceivable. I don't think that motherboard supports ddr4 ram. Does any motherboard support ddr4? pretty sure its not out yet in any form, so if you want ddr4, you will have to wait a couple years for it to be released.
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Old 2012-10-05, 01:52   Link #22
Simonsy
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I see the topic is talking about the SSD's.

I was curious about them. I know how they work and all, don't need info on that, just wondering on a thing if i got one.

I have 3 hard-drives.

1. Main - OS, most programs installed on this
2. Secondary - All my games are installed on this
3. Misc - This is like files like pictures, movies, songs, ect on it.

If I were to get an SSD what would be the best thing to do. I would mainly consider it for gaming. Do I just install my games on the SSD and bam the games are faster? Or do I need to have the SSD be my main with the OS installed on it and also install my games on it?

I'm weary about getting an SSD cause I feel like having my OS on a normal HD and my games on the SSD that the normal hard-drives will cancel out the SSD's benefit, since the OS is on the hard-drive and not the SSD.
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Old 2012-10-05, 02:13   Link #23
Irenicus
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If you have an SSD, put the OS on it. No question.

Games if you have the space, so pick and choose the most important ones you want to have that loading time perk. But OS first, always. Then frequent programs (browsers, office, antivirus, etc.), then games. Static media is of course a waste on it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urzu 7
I've been doing homework on parts for this system. For a power supply, I'm getting a Seasonic X-Series PSU, which is a top tier brand and model according to a reliable source. It is 80 Plus Gold. It is 850W. I used a PSU calculator and factored in many things for it (wasn't conservative with it), and the recommended wattage was 688. A 850W PSU should be all I need.
That Seasonic isn't ever going to be used to its full potential. The recommended wattage you get from online calculators has to take into account much worse PSU's than the mighty Seasonic Gold.

Most PSU's are variably efficient at different points and worse in others (20%, 50%, 80%, for example), so the PSU experts love to complain that noobs buy big wattages to waste electricity on. But that's not a problem for you, since the Seasonic 80+ Gold is essentially efficient at all usage levels (that's what the rating means).

It just means you'll pay for more than you'll ever use, though, unless you go nuts with Crossfire/SLI, lots of hard drives, and a bunch of peripheries.
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Old 2012-10-05, 02:24   Link #24
Urzu 7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irenicus View Post
If you have an SSD, put the OS on it. No question.

Games if you have the space, so pick and choose the most important ones you want to have that loading time perk. But OS first, always. Then frequent programs (browsers, office, antivirus, etc.), then games. Static media is of course a waste on it.


That Seasonic isn't ever going to be used to its full potential. The recommended wattage you get from online calculators has to take into account much worse PSU's than the mighty Seasonic Gold.

Most PSU's are variably efficient at different points and worse in others (20%, 50%, 80%, for example), so the PSU experts love to complain that noobs buy big wattages to waste electricity on. But that's not a problem for you, since the Seasonic 80+ Gold is essentially efficient at all usage levels (that's what the rating means).

It just means you'll pay for more than you'll ever use, though, unless you go nuts with Crossfire/SLI, lots of hard drives, and a bunch of peripheries.
Would it still be a good idea to get that 850W Seasonic, in case I use it in a future upgrade that has a GPU that takes a lot of wattage? I'm sure it'll be more wattage than I'll ever need, but I'd rather it have the ability to take on more wattage than I'll ever need it to rather than getting a 700W PSU that isn't enough for a future upgrade and it results in my PSU dying. My current PC, I made the mistake of getting a cheap, generic PSU and it pathetically died from something very minor and then I had the fun of losing my PC for a week or two as I shopped around for a new one, had it mailed to me, and then had to put the new PSU in, complete with drawing a diagram that helped keep track or where all the components plugged into. No, it wasn't all real terrible, but I could've done without it. I know now to invest in good quality PSUs, and it is good to get one with a wattage that should always be able to handle the wattage you throw at it.
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Old 2012-10-05, 02:55   Link #25
Irenicus
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Don't get me wrong, it's a top of the line model. Just for the quality and efficiency (+ I checked newegg and it seems to be modular too, great), worth every dime. And yes, quality PSU is never something to scrimp on. It's just that you're not ever going to actually push it unless you have big expansion plans (like a second, power-hungry high end GPU), so a smaller X-series model might just suffice and save you a bit for no loss. But if you're worried nonetheless, invest away.

I'd advise more strongly against it if you were choosing a high wattage model that is rated lower in terms of efficiency (be eco-friendly, people ), but as I said, that model isn't going to have much efficiency problems running at whatever levels of power consumption so it won't be "wasting."
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Old 2012-10-05, 03:46   Link #26
sa547
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650w is enough for most day-to-day applications; 850w is way too much unless you're building a hardcore gaming rig from the ground up.

Also, some video cards are being restructured to be more efficient in terms of power consumption.
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Old 2012-10-06, 02:12   Link #27
Wandering_Youth
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CPU:
If your new computer is for pure HD gaming and entertainment then stick with a I5 because for those purposes specifically raw speed is what's important and not number of cores. If you were building a workstation video editing and 3D modeling then it be the opposite.

Motherboard:
Be very careful in picking your motherboard make sure you know exactly what's on the motherboard and know what exactly you want to get. As most motherboards has a bunch of features you may not ever use. Are you overclocking? Are you making a mini PC case? You got to ask yourself these things. I personally prefer a Gigabyte as they stick to the basics making a good solid and durable motherboard that lasts a long time under non ideal conditions.

RAM:
8GB of RAM is the standard now, but it doesn't hurt go up more if you have the cash as Windows 7 adapts to the amount of RAM available in your system to optimize it. I personally bought 16GB for my computer and use half of that for system/game cache to decrease load times.

Sound Card:
I personally like dedicated sound cards, I used to use integrated sound cards then move up to Creative cards and now Asus Xonar. On today's modern computers the extra load integrated sound cards puts on the system is rather minimum thanks powerful CPUs, lots of RAM and faster hd. If sound is not important for you then skip the sound card, but if you really like sound quality, immersion with games and surround then buy a dedicated card. I play a lot of FPS games so sound is must for me.

Hard Drives:
If you got the cash then I really highly recommend getting at least one SSD and use it for your OS system. The speed benefits and difference between regular hd and SSD is worlds apart. The computer boots up super fast, programs launch quicker and the overall system just feels more responsive. Now if you a lot of cash then you can go all SSD.

GPU:
It sometimes still shocks me how the GPU is usually the most expensive thing on a computer. For gamers a good GPU is must as that goes without saying. I personally prefer Nvidia cards as they seem to work closer with a lot of game developers to optimize their games for smoother running. I don't have much insight about ATI cards as I never used them.

Misc:
Other things you might consider is upgrade your PC case as the new hardware you'll be buying may require efficient ventilation to work optimally.

My computer is half a year old and pretty much has some of the items your thinking about.

Intel I5 3750k
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO CPU Cooler
Gigabyte Z77-UD5H
16GB Corsair RAM (4x4GB)
Asus Xonar DX Sound Card
Nvidia GTX 680 (Gigabyte WindForce Edition)
120GB Force 3 Corsair SSD
250GBx2 WD Velicaraptor HD (RAID 0)
1TBx4 WD Blue HD (RAID 5)
Corsair 1200W Slient Gold PSW
Cooler Master HAF 922 PC Case
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Old 2012-10-06, 19:17   Link #28
SinsI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spikexp View Post
Windows : If it came with your computer, you can't reuse it (it's probably OEM).
I would suggest getting windows 7 Home Premium 64bit OEM (under 100$ most of the time), it have all the good feature without going over the top.
The license is perfectly valid as long as you use it on one and only one computer at the same time. You might have to telephone activate it (don't forget to say that you are upgrading your PC, not installing it on a new one).
No need to pay Microsoft tax more than once.
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Old 2012-10-11, 00:26   Link #29
Tong
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Hm, I didn't need to format when I changed from a 775 to 1155.

And no, not running into problems lol
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Old 2012-10-11, 19:44   Link #30
Urzu 7
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: New England
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Here are the specs of the system I want:

Intel i5 3570K LGA 1155 processor (quad core, 3.4 GHz)
Asus P8Z77-V LGA 1155 motherboard
Seasonic X-Series 850W PSU 80 Plus Gold
8 GB DDR3 1600 RAM Corsair Vengeance
Corsair Obsidian Series 550D case
A Blu-ray drive
A DVD drive (capable of writing data on dual layer DVDs)
Samsung 830 Series 256 GB SSD
Samsung Spinpoint 1 TB HDD (I might get two 1 TB hard drives)
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO CPU cooler

I might get two 1 TB hard drives because I found those 1 TB Samsung hard drives to be very reliable (based on checking out and reading many reviews).

As for the GPU, I want to get a Radeon HD 7950. Should I get one from MSI or one from Gigabyte? Here are links to the cards. There are reviews for the cards in the links.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...scrollFullInfo

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16814127667
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Old 2012-10-11, 19:56   Link #31
erneiz_hyde
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urzu 7 View Post
I might get two 1 TB hard drives because I found those 1 TB Samsung hard drives to be very reliable (based on checking out and reading many reviews).
afaik, there're already 2TB or even 3 TB HDs. Is there a reason why you're not opting to buy one of these instead? I'd like to know for my own reference later.
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Old 2012-10-11, 20:47   Link #32
Urzu 7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erneiz_hyde View Post
afaik, there're already 2TB or even 3 TB HDs. Is there a reason why you're not opting to buy one of these instead? I'd like to know for my own reference later.
I plan to get the system from a site called AVADirect. I looked at 2 TB and 1.5 TB drives that they offered for system configurations. I looked for ones that are 7200 RPM. I looked up reviews on newegg.com for various HDDs. I checked out the low rated reviews (1 out of 5, 2 out of 5) and read what issues people had; for why they gave low review scores. The 1 TB Samsung Spinpoint F3 HDD seems like a real reliable HDD model. I think someone in this thread said you can't rely on newegg HDD reviews too much, though. I think they said that they don't protect them well when shipping them out to people.

Despite that, that model hard drive seems to be the most reliable based on observing and reading the reviews. On top of this, I got a lead on some components to get from a gaming PC thread at the neogaf forums. That HDD model was recommended in a guideline for components to get for a build-your-own PC.

Once I back up the data from my current PC, I will order a new PC. In the last couple of weeks or so, I've been doing homework on PC components. I didn't intend to get so into it, but once I did homework on some components and found out some I were considering were prone to problems, I started looking into every component and even asked for some help at the Tom's Hardware forums (a lot of people seek help there, and people there love to help with PC inquires and problems). Doing homework on PC components should pay off well for me. It has helped me select a lot of quality components and find components that are more reliable than ones I was once considering.

About 3 TB drives, the technology still needs to improve some more. They aren't as reliable as 2 TB drives. I remember when they first starting hitting the market, I read some people saying you should stay away from them because they were prone to problems. They've improved since they have first started being sold, but they still need to improve more.
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Last edited by Urzu 7; 2012-10-11 at 21:01.
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Old 2012-10-11, 23:05   Link #33
Random32
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Actually the differences between HDD reliability per capacity is pretty negligible. Just go for cheapest per gigabyte.

If you care about your data, you should be doing RAID or regular backups or something anyways. (I was going to do all caps too, but it didn't look right)If you are concerned with not being able to replace a failed HDD for whatever reason, I would suggesting finding models offered with 5 year warranties (I know that WD/Hitachi and Seagate offer them).
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Old 2012-10-12, 02:01   Link #34
sa547
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On the question of RAID for home computing:
http://voices.yahoo.com/deciding-rai...e-5558591.html
http://www.overclock.net/t/534778/should-i-use-raid
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/raid-st...ogy-explained/
http://superuser.com/questions/11598...sktop-computer

Unless the PC is being used for multiple purposes (as a media center, home automation, all-purpose server, etc.) at home, or the budget allows for the purchase and installation of multiple drives, I prefer a periodic data backup regimen.
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Old 2012-10-12, 19:46   Link #35
Urzu 7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Random32 View Post
Actually the differences between HDD reliability per capacity is pretty negligible. Just go for cheapest per gigabyte.

If you care about your data, you should be doing RAID or regular backups or something anyways. (I was going to do all caps too, but it didn't look right)If you are concerned with not being able to replace a failed HDD for whatever reason, I would suggesting finding models offered with 5 year warranties (I know that WD/Hitachi and Seagate offer them).

People at the Tom's Hardware forums said I don't need to do RAID. I might get 2 HDDs, though, possibly. I'll have an SSD, too.

I think my best bet is to do regular backups. Tomorrow (or maybe tonight), I'll back up my iTunes purchases and music library and fansubs to an external HDD. I'll back up all my data on an external HDD. I'll backup my Firefox bookmarks soon. I need to back up some PC game saves (most of it will be Skyrim save data).
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Old 2012-10-12, 23:13   Link #36
iceyfw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urzu 7 View Post
As for the GPU, I want to get a Radeon HD 7950. Should I get one from MSI or one from Gigabyte? Here are links to the cards. There are reviews for the cards in the links.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...scrollFullInfo

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16814127667
you can go either way as both are good.
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Old 2012-10-13, 20:29   Link #37
DonQuigleone
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Age: 26
Just to get back, I just built my machine, similar specs to yours (IE Intel i5 3570, asus P8Z77-V motherboard), and it's running well. With the SSD it now takes ~5 seconds for my computer to boot up, and maybe another 2-5 seconds to log in.

Magic!
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Old 2012-10-13, 20:42   Link #38
Urzu 7
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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Age: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonQuigleone View Post
Just to get back, I just built my machine, similar specs to yours (IE Intel i5 3570, asus P8Z77-V motherboard), and it's running well. With the SSD it now takes ~5 seconds for my computer to boot up, and maybe another 2-5 seconds to log in.

Magic!
What'd you get for an SSD and what'd you get for a GPU?
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Old 2012-10-13, 21:03   Link #39
DonQuigleone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urzu 7 View Post
What'd you get for an SSD and what'd you get for a GPU?
Samsung 830 series was my SSD (same as yourself). Though I got the 128 GB model. If you have the extra cash, I would spring for the extra space though.

My GPU is retained from my previous computer (it's an old ATI Radeon HD 4850). In the short term, I don't think I need to replace it. I expect to do so within a year or two though.
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Old 2012-10-13, 21:20   Link #40
Urzu 7
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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Age: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonQuigleone View Post
Samsung 830 series was my SSD (same as yourself). Though I got the 128 GB model. If you have the extra cash, I would spring for the extra space though.

My GPU is retained from my previous computer (it's an old ATI Radeon HD 4850). In the short term, I don't think I need to replace it. I expect to do so within a year or two though.
Really good GPUs aren't really utilized to great potential right now. Your card will play every game out there if you just scale the effects to medium and don't put on high AA and so forth. Your card is still very good for many games that have released in the last 18 months. Once XBox 720 and PS4 hit, the highest end AMD and nVidia cards currently available will start to be better utilized. 8 GB of RAM will matter for gaming then, too. And good i5 and i7 processors will be better utilized.

I want to get a 256 GB SSD. A 512 GB SSD would be great, but they cost $500. Totally not worth it unless you have a lot of money to spend.
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