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Old 2006-01-17, 03:11   Link #21
GATX207_Blitz
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>.> can you specify what kind of japanese candy???

I personally like hi-chew no preference in flavor. I also like mitsuya ciders and the ramune one. soda candys are good.
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Old 2006-01-17, 09:29   Link #22
Sakaki
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Meji Black is one of the best chocolate I've had, and their chocolate covered almonds are really delicious.
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Old 2006-01-17, 14:03   Link #23
Dorfl
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No, no, Meiji white chocolate. It's fantastic! There was a point where I was going through four or five bars a day. *drool*
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Old 2007-06-30, 03:09   Link #24
pepper_begs
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Smile Japanese potato stew

Hi,

Does anyone in have a recipe for Japanese Potato Stew?

I had it once. It was vegetarian and flavored with Miso.

I've tried google but the version I want is too homestyle to be listed on food sites.

Thanks in advance
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Old 2007-06-30, 11:49   Link #25
Vexx
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Meh, never mind.. thread moving too fast.

Sounds like a lot of people have very little experience with japanese food though.... kind of sad. (or any other kind of asian food ...korean, vietnamese, and indian foods --- all yummy).
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Old 2007-06-30, 13:37   Link #26
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This calls for a get-together so I can teach people to make rolls (commonly called "sushi rolls", but they're not sushi). Wrapped in seaweed, there's rice inside, and I like putting in strips of hot dog, pickled daikon, avacado, leafy greens, crab meat, etc.... XD

I have a (humorous) clip teaching people how to eat at a sushi bar. ("Humorous", I said -- don't take everything so seriously.)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCpbBVthD7o
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Old 2007-06-30, 14:06   Link #27
Deathkillz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
Meh, never mind.. thread moving too fast.

Sounds like a lot of people have very little experience with japanese food though.... kind of sad. (or any other kind of asian food ...korean, vietnamese, and indian foods --- all yummy).
not forgetting real chinese food unlike those crappy take outs modified to suit the tastes of the locals >.<
Quote:
Originally Posted by Risaa View Post
I have a (humorous) clip teaching people how to eat at a sushi bar. ("Humorous", I said -- don't take everything so seriously.)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCpbBVthD7o
"tabe mas...tabe mas...tabe mas...tabe mas..."
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Old 2007-06-30, 14:07   Link #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Risaa View Post
I have a (humorous) clip teaching people how to eat at a sushi bar. ("Humorous", I said -- don't take everything so seriously.)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCpbBVthD7o
Remember, folks, don't be so gullible about Japanese traditions!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f50LchOltoI

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Old 2007-12-07, 16:01   Link #29
pepper_begs
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Homestyle Japanese Cooking

Hi, does any one know a good site for simple homestyle Japanese recipes?

I've searched but generally I get fancy stuff. I am really interested in vegetarian food.
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Old 2007-12-07, 17:10   Link #30
Sinestra
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Yakitori and and Soba all the way man so damn good but you cant skip out the standard GAINT FREAKIN BOWL OF RAMEN.
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Old 2007-12-07, 17:14   Link #31
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I'm a rice person and love sushi and onigiri. I like wasabi as well.
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Old 2007-12-07, 19:01   Link #32
Kang Seung Jae
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aahhsin View Post
Curry is Indian.
No, curry (the concept of the dish) is of British origin.


I'll contribute to this discussion later. Prepare your eyes.
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Old 2007-12-07, 19:54   Link #33
Vexx
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Well... eventually *everything is probably "chinese" or at least west asian
Pasta is a chinese import to Italy after all.... at some point you just have to say its been integrated into the culture.

After all, "american food" is really Anglo-Franco-Germ-Ital-Japa-Chino-Morocc-....... well, you get the idea.

Its kind of like I prefer pronouncing placenames the way the locals do if I can .... if someone claims a food as their own (especially if its a variant version) its close enough for me.
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Old 2007-12-08, 01:44   Link #34
Takeru
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My 2¢, don't eat whatever that little white thing with a house on it is in those candy bento boxes!!
God that was disgusting.
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Old 2007-12-08, 08:49   Link #35
tripperazn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
Well... eventually *everything is probably "chinese" or at least west asian
Yup, even today, we are a rather omnivorous people with creative cuisine. Not at all uncommon to find deep fried scorpion on a stick served with various sauces. Though that particular dish is unlikely to catch on...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
Pasta is a chinese import to Italy after all.... at some point you just have to say its been integrated into the culture.

After all, "american food" is really Anglo-Franco-Germ-Ital-Japa-Chino-Morocc-....... well, you get the idea.

Its kind of like I prefer pronouncing placenames the way the locals do if I can .... if someone claims a food as their own (especially if its a variant version) its close enough for me.
I guess it's the "take an existing product and improve it" methodology that has pretty much been associated with Japan. Add that reputation to the fact that a lot of it's acquisitions are relatively recent like modern Ramen and Curry (it originated in Southern Asia, but the Japanese way of eating it [Kare- Raisu] was started in an English restaurant according to "Addicted to Curry").

That isn't to say native Japanese cuisine isn't interesting. Personally, I've always wanted to try Nattou, but I'm not even sure I'll be able to stomach that.
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Old 2007-12-09, 00:45   Link #36
aohige
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kang Seung Jae View Post
No, curry (the concept of the dish) is of British origin.

I'll contribute to this discussion later. Prepare your eyes.
Yes and no.
Curry is, and has always been, Indian origin.
However, the type of "gravy" like curry sauce that Japanese eat came to Japan from England, which adopted the curry powder from India while its occupation, and modified it to thick soup like sauce.

You can't just straight out say "curry is british origin" or you'll have angry offended Indian and Pakistani on your ass.
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Old 2007-12-09, 01:39   Link #37
HASHIRIYA
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I personally can't eat most jap food. not a seafood person ether

the caffeine gum is the best tho
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Old 2007-12-09, 04:29   Link #38
Spectacular_Insanity
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Old 2007-12-09, 06:43   Link #39
Kang Seung Jae
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aohige View Post
Yes and no.
Curry is, and has always been, Indian origin.
However, the type of "gravy" like curry sauce that Japanese eat came to Japan from England, which adopted the curry powder from India while its occupation, and modified it to thick soup like sauce.

You can't just straight out say "curry is british origin" or you'll have angry offended Indian and Pakistani on your ass.
I personally do not recognize the use of curry leaves (kari) in cooking as "curry" as we speak of it. (By the way, the word curry is of British origin.)

Fortuantely, my Indian friends agree with me.
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Old 2007-12-09, 10:22   Link #40
Jiji
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The way I got started with cooking my own Japanese food was with teriyaki. I quickly found out that NO bottled teriyaki sauce can measure up to making your own -- which is incredibly easy.

You need:
Mirin (sweet cooking sake)
Sake (cheap stuff for cooking is ok)
Shoyu (soy sauce)

just mix them in equal portions. This makes a great marinade, but be careful of marinading pork -- it takes the flavour too well and will taste strong.
You'll find that it's not thick at all, and if you want to thicken it like the syrupy bottled stuff, then you'll add sugar and cook it on the stove until it boils down. You can also add sugar if you're going to broil your meat (like a nice piece of salmon) and use the sauce for basting with a brush.

What I typically do is take a boneless chicken breast, cube it and put into the sauce to marinade. Then I chop up green onions and snow peas and put them in too. They can sit overnight. I soak some rice and cook it. Then I heat up some peanut oil or butter in a pan, crush some garlic, sprinkle some ginger and when it's hot, throw in the chicken and a few of the onions to brown. As soon as they're browned, I toss in the rest of the veggies and basically stir-fry until the snow peas are still crisp, but cooked. I drain off the cooked sauce and serve the chix and veggies on top of a large bowl with a cup of rice on the bottom. Mm!
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