AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > Anime Related Topics > General Anime

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2012-12-30, 23:40   Link #61
bhl88
Otaku Apprentice
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: The Unseen Horizon
Send a message via MSN to bhl88 Send a message via Yahoo to bhl88
Yeah something like that.
__________________

Dang it Avalon, you c(XD LOL)-block Shirou and Reinforce, but don't protect his mind in other ways? What is wrong, you woman?
Friendship, be made! Magical power, gather! Starlight Breaker.... this world!
bhl88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2012-12-31, 03:32   Link #62
Traece
:cool:
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Idaho
Age: 22
Gender roles.

Gender roles.

That's the sort of psychological answer to this question.

Men are the big, emotionally mute, strong protectors and workers. Women are the sweet, kind, caring and destructible; they also do things like "tame" the men and bring happiness and emotion to balance things out.

Obviously there are many examples of tragic heroes and not just heroines (or even male and female characters in general). The majority of tragedy rests with heroines though. It's society and gender roles that make it very easy to be empathetic of those tragedy-stricken females and thus feel more affected by their plights and how they succumb or rise above those events.

Honestly, I find myself caring about the fates of male characters more when they are the white knight kind of character, like Katsuragi Keima. Although on the flip side I also care more for female characters who are strong and reserved, but have a feminine side as well, like Ayumi. Realistically, characters like that on the female side tend to have humble or less fortunate backgrounds. From what I can remember, a lot of female characters who have tragic stories fit more into that description, and the rest that I can remember are just crazy people.

With that being said, the biggest factor is likability. It's easier to make a female more likable since they are typically less reserved and thus more relatable emotionally.
__________________
Traece is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2013-01-01, 02:12   Link #63
Skane
Anime Snark
 
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 31
Talking

I must be getting old... no wait, Vexx posted, but nobody has mentioned X/1999 yet? It's subtitle might as well be "Tragedy Doesn't Give A Blip What Gender You Are". Sure... the girls were pretty sob-worthy, but some of the guys make the girls look like they live rainbow-coated, candy-filled lives.

No seriously... watch X/1999 (or the series if you find movies too abridged) if you haven't yet. Arguably, the most tragic male character is... the most happy one (people who have watched it before should know who I am talking about).

YouTube
Sorry; dynamic content not loaded. Reload?

Cheers, and happy sobbing!
__________________
Skane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2013-01-01, 10:29   Link #64
SPARTAN 119
Unleashing the Homu-Rage
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by GDiddy View Post
As for why females are the harbingers of tragedy, considering that most of the viewers are males, I guess it all ties back to the MOE thing: Isn't it supposed to mean that the viewers want to protect a character or something like that?
Exactly, I was involved with a rather lengthy discussion about this in the discussion of moe thread, the post shown below:

Spoiler for Kara No Kyoukai 3 spoilers:


On that note, as I suggested in the previous post in the moe discussion, for some reason, I am not effected by the "moe" desire to protect a character UNLESS she goes through some sort of tragedy. However, I am deeply effected by characters with a tragic past or who are currently going through some sort of tragedy, such as Asagami Fujino (Kara no Kyoukai), Akemi Homura (Madoka), Sachi (Sword Art Online) etc. Also, I know I'm getting sucked into cliches here, but I prefer the ending where the tragic character overcomes her tragedy and, preferably, gets revenge on her tormentor (again, see Asagami Fujino, Kara no Kyoukai movie 3).
SPARTAN 119 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2013-01-01, 19:11   Link #65
Vexx
Obey the Darkly Cute ...
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 57
Since the cookie system is gone, all I can do is toss SPARTAN119 a virtual cookie. Nice write up explaining that 'protective feeling' that isn't always sexual.
__________________
Vexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2013-01-01, 19:58   Link #66
Archon_Wing
Throw it on the ground
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The Mists
Age: 30
Send a message via MSN to Archon_Wing
Quote:
Originally Posted by SPARTAN 119 View Post
Also, I know I'm getting sucked into cliches here, but I prefer the ending where the tragic character overcomes her tragedy and, preferably, gets revenge on her tormentor (again, see Asagami Fujino, Kara no Kyoukai movie 3).
Well, it's definitely a cliche that works for any kind of protagonist that gets beaten down and finally defeats their enemy in some way. It certainly is better than the tragic stories that are thrown in solely for shock value and really have no resolution. That just serves to throw in as a plot device to make you feel sorry for them.

For example. If I made a character incredibly annoying, and then without warning randomly threw an ancedote about how her treasured puppy was all she had to her because her parents neglected her and went on a graphical account of how the puppy was tortured to death by a bunch of heartless thugs that are never seen or mentioned again, and then she proceeded to run for help and then got hit by a bus and thus she is now crippled, that would be contrived. And then never mention the scene again or its relevance-- That would come as ridiculously heavy handed. That would only serve to make you feel bad for not liking them and adds nothing to the story.

If on the other hand, we reveal that a character's parents are abusive and was hinting due to their withdrawn mannerisms then that makes sense even though that can be a cliche too since now trying to find some kind of peace or resolution can add to their plot and character. Now if the story bothers to embrace continuity and this actually develops into a useful part of the character's development, then there's a point here and not just blatant pity pathos pandering. The later just gives us more to hope for and more for the characters to do, allowing a certain sense of catharsis which leads to a far bigger payoff than just mere shock value.
__________________
You just try again... through the darkness.You just go away... the future is waiting for us!
Avatar and Sig courtesy of TheEroKing
Guild Wars 2 SN: ArchonWing.9480 (Stormbluff Isle)
MyAnimeList || Reviews
Archon_Wing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2013-01-01, 22:29   Link #67
SPARTAN 119
Unleashing the Homu-Rage
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archon_Wing View Post
Allowing a certain sense of catharsis which leads to a far bigger payoff than just mere shock value.
Yeah, that's why though the fact that
Spoiler for Madoka spoilers:
SPARTAN 119 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2013-01-01, 23:01   Link #68
Archon_Wing
Throw it on the ground
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The Mists
Age: 30
Send a message via MSN to Archon_Wing
Quote:
Originally Posted by SPARTAN 119 View Post
Yeah, that's why though the fact that
Spoiler for Madoka spoilers:
Spoiler:
__________________
You just try again... through the darkness.You just go away... the future is waiting for us!
Avatar and Sig courtesy of TheEroKing
Guild Wars 2 SN: ArchonWing.9480 (Stormbluff Isle)
MyAnimeList || Reviews
Archon_Wing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2013-01-01, 23:01   Link #69
Sackett
Cross Game - I need more
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: I've moved around the American West. I've lived in Oregon, Washington, Utah, and Oklahoma
Age: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eragon View Post
So, I just finished watching Shiki(whose thread, btw, is filled to the brim with hypocrisy) and this thought kept nagging me - I'm sure people who have watched the show know which character I'm talking about.
Why are girls - irrespective of age - used to portray tragedy. For example, take Lucy from Elfen Lied or Ei from Jigoku Shoujo or the the characters from Saya & Diva from Blood+.

Is it because its easier to make a women's life miserable? Or is it because you can tug at the audiences heart strings more effectively with a female tragic figure?


If you think my views are skewed and that guys, too, are used as much as girls for portraying tragic figures then do correct me.
This is hardly an anime thing. Just consider Fantine from Les Mis.

Jungian analysis suggests that abused female characters are likely used to symbolize the violation of the mother figure. This creates a protective and defensive feeling. On the other hand abused male figures are more likely to symbolize a violation of a father figure, creating a feeling of powerlessness and helplessness. Thus only fully tragic stories (or rebirth stories) are likely to have an abused male figure, while abused female characters can be used in many ways to create a story - Call to Adventure, a goal for the Hero, a measure of his success.

The above would be my guess as to why they are so common. Go read The Seven Basic Plots for more details.
__________________

Cross Game - A Story of Love, Life, Death - and Baseball. What more could you want?
Sackett is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:50.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
We use Silk.