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Old 2013-02-11, 03:05   Link #26321
SaintessHeart
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Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 26
Greece need to go back to producing material things and taxing their businesses instead of giving them tax breaks and holidays all the way.

I thought Greece used to be known for their olives. Do they still export them?
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When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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Old 2013-02-11, 03:47   Link #26322
Zakoo
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I m not sure you can make an economy an olive alone.

they make all their girls cosplay into gothic lolita/maid and at least they will have new wave of tourists.
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Old 2013-02-11, 04:07   Link #26323
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zakoo View Post
I m not sure you can make an economy an olive alone.

they make all their girls cosplay into gothic lolita/maid and at least they will have new wave of tourists.
Ah yes, and the French would sue them for copyright.

Greece should just invade France for the rights of maid cosplay - they shouldn't have any trouble.
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When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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Old 2013-02-11, 04:29   Link #26324
Zakoo
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We love exporting our fetish. Look at Japan and how much they like maids and undergarments.

The sakuya fan in me is revivinnnng
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Old 2013-02-11, 04:42   Link #26325
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zakoo View Post
We love exporting our fetish. Look at Japan and how much they like maids and undergarments.

The sakuya fan in me is revivinnnng
I don't remember the French being supportive of pads. *RUNS*

This is actually how the European Union is conceived :

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When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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Old 2013-02-11, 05:34   Link #26326
RRW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
I don't remember the French being supportive of pads. *RUNS*

This is actually how the European Union is conceived :

Images
better version
Sorry; dynamic content not loaded. Reload?

it only swap French and Italy
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Old 2013-02-11, 05:51   Link #26327
Zakoo
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Gods there were tons of people when i opened this. You could have warned us i don t know what to tell them now.

There isnt enough love towards our ingeeners in your hellish world, i cant accept this.
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Old 2013-02-11, 06:44   Link #26328
ganbaru
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Betweem wisdom and insanity
Pope Benedict XVI resign
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...91A0B820130211

U.N. monitors see arms reaching Somalia from Yemen, Iran
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...9190E420130211
Why am I not surprised than Iran would do such thing...
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Old 2013-02-11, 09:02   Link #26329
DonQuigleone
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I was expecting Benedict XVI to be lasting a bit longer.

It's somewhat without precedence. I wonder, will he go by Ratszinger again, or stick with Benedict? And will he go back to being a cardinal?

Either way, he obviously didn't want to go the route of John Paul II, and spend the last few years wasting away with declining mental faculties.
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Old 2013-02-11, 09:07   Link #26330
Sumeragi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonQuigleone View Post
It's somewhat without precedence. I wonder, will he go by Ratszinger again, or stick with Benedict? And will he go back to being a cardinal?
Gregory XII in 1415 and Celestine V in 1294 are the two resignations I can remember.
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Old 2013-02-11, 09:18   Link #26331
DonQuigleone
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Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Gregory XII in 1415 and Celestine V in 1294 are the two resignations I can remember.
When an event hasn't occurred for 600 years, it's fairly unprecedented.
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Old 2013-02-11, 09:18   Link #26332
Mentar
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I find Ratzinger's decision to step down highly respectable. How rare is it that people have the self-awareness and self-reflection to recognize when they don't have the necessary strength anymore to fulfill their task.

So, I can only hope that he starts a tradition.
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Old 2013-02-11, 09:19   Link #26333
Sumeragi
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Originally Posted by Mentar View Post
So, I can only hope that he starts a tradition.
I don't agree with forming a resigning tradition. Maybe it's just my being conservative, but I sort of expect the position to be for life.
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Old 2013-02-11, 09:28   Link #26334
Mentar
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Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
I don't agree with forming a resigning tradition. Maybe it's just my being conservative, but I sort of expect the position to be for life.
But why?

I am a practicing catholic, and I have to recognize that all too often, popes in their terminal days are unable to be the father of the flock. Is it in the interest of the church to have the pope carried to Urbi et Orbi, and forcing him through the ceremony, before he is returned to his sickbed?

It is a very demanding office, and I strongly doubt that Benedict shed it lightly. He sounded very, very frail when he explained his step. I honestly think it's better for the church to pass on the baton to someone whose age doesn't force him to wither away, but who is able to serve the church to the best of his abilities.
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Old 2013-02-11, 09:38   Link #26335
Sumeragi
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How often are we going to have that many old popes being elected, or that many popes serving more than twenty years? My point was that the general history is weighted against there being a tradition in the first place, and furthermore such tradition would be contrary to the laws of the Church, where resignations must be purely voluntary. A tradition is NOT voluntary, since it is a form of pressure.

I respect Benedict XVI's decision, but the idea that a tradition should be formed is a dangerous one which is contrary to the laws of the Church.
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Old 2013-02-11, 09:41   Link #26336
Mentar
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Explain to me please how stepping down is "against the law of the church"? It isn't. If there is one thing that particularly Benedict was always extremely particular about, it was adherance to clerical law.
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Old 2013-02-11, 09:43   Link #26337
Sumeragi
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I said tradition, not resignation. Read carefully.
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Old 2013-02-11, 09:54   Link #26338
Vexx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Gregory XII in 1415 and Celestine V in 1294 are the two resignations I can remember.
Waiting for someone in your cult following to announce this is proof that you're a thousand year old vampire big sister.
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Old 2013-02-11, 10:11   Link #26339
Mentar
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Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
I said tradition, not resignation. Read carefully.
Hey, YOU wrote stuff about "against the law of the church", not me. Those are YOUR words, and neither his resignation nor starting a tradition to resign upon failing strength would be against the law of the church.

You're entitled to your personal opinion, but I honestly hope that popes in modern times resign when the time comes.
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Old 2013-02-11, 10:13   Link #26340
Sumeragi
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Do I need to quote myself?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
How often are we going to have that many old popes being elected, or that many popes serving more than twenty years? My point was that the general history is weighted against there being a tradition in the first place, and furthermore such tradition would be contrary to the laws of the Church, where resignations must be purely voluntary. A tradition is NOT voluntary, since it is a form of pressure.

I respect Benedict XVI's decision, but the idea that a tradition should be formed is a dangerous one which is contrary to the laws of the Church.
Your reading comprehension needs some updating.


As for why I would think a tradition would be against the laws of the Church: Code of Canon Law, canon 332 2 states "Should it happen that the Roman Pontiff resigns from his office, it is required for validity that the resignation be freely made and properly manifested, but it is not necessary that it be accepted by anyone."

A tradition is a form of pressure that can render resignations as not being freely made.
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