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Old 2014-01-05, 01:11   Link #2441
Triple_R
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Originally Posted by all_flying View Post
I think you're being biased.
How am I being biased? If you want me to elaborate, then you should elaborate on your points as well.


Quote:
For starters, I don't really get what this 'comfort zone' was all about.
KyoAni's comfort zone has been discussed at length on various KyoAni threads, so I didn't think it would be a term that Anime Suki members would not get at this point. But, to be fair, I guess the fact that it's been discussed on various threads has resulted in the discussion being fragmented, so further elaboration might be helpful.

Guardian Enzo once wrote a post on the Kyokai no Kanata series thread that I think ties into a fairly common understanding of KyoAni's comfort zone. Here is his post. And now I will quote most of it...

"I equate it to a filter that every KyoAni show gets put through - like a special lens on the camera that tints everything in a certain way. Moe girls and cute, harmless boys, comedically sexy teacher types, falling leaves and cherry blossoms. It's certainly evident in a show like Free!, which despite the radical (for KyoAni) departure of five male leads, ends up looking and sounding exactly like the prototypical Kyoto Animation series with an extra piece of anatomy.

To what extent a Kyoto Animation show succeeds (artistically - commercial success is a near-certainty) probably depends on how well the material is suited to this treatment." - Guardian Enzo (bold emphasis mine)

I agree with this post. There is indeed a certain filter that just about every KyoAni show gets put through (FMP is an exception, but it's also quite old). This filter, by extension, determines KyoAni's comfort zone. The shows that fit this filter the best are the best shows for KyoAni to work with.

And not all shows fit that filter well. For example, Fate/Zero and Psycho-Pass would run almost entirely counter to it. So Fate/Zero and Psycho-Pass (and shows very much like them) do not fit well in KyoAni's comfort zone, and represent the types of content that KyoAni probably shouldn't bother dabbling in.


Quote:
Also, you clearly doesn't know what you're talking about.
Wrong. I know well what I'm talking about. Half-assed is a very common term, and I'm using it correctly. Here is a link to an on-line definition of the term. Consistent with that definition, I am saying that when KyoAni ventures too far outside of their comfort zone, we start to see incompetency from them and their work. I used the term "half-assed" also because of the mental association that the term "half" can have. When watching Kyoukai no Kanata, I felt like KyoAni could only go half-way to being a truly dark, suspenseful, action-packed show. It couldn't go all the way to being a Shakugan no Shana or a Fate/Zero. And that's because it is very attached to its comfort zone; its filter as Guardian Enzo put it.

I had much the same experience with watching Tamako Market - That it was trying to appeal to two different sorts of potential viewers, and so it was only going half-way in trying to please either of them.

Instead of working with the type of content that KyoAni tends to go half-way with (due to their own stylistic tendencies that can run counter to certain types of content), I think that KyoAni should stick to what it's good at. I don't see anything unreasonable or overly harsh or "biased" about this position.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dextro View Post
I agree with you... *snip*
Thank you for your eloquent reply. You did a great job of summing up the weaknesses in Kyoukai no Kanata and how they relate to what we're both agreeing on.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ultimatemegax View Post
I agree with what all_flying said: you need to expand upon your "comfort zone" statement. "KnK has dark and action-packed sections." Well, so does FMP, Haruhi, Munto, and Nichijou has the latter.
This only supports my point, as Munto and Nichijou did poorly commercially by KyoAni's standards, as did Tamako Market and likely Kyokai no Kanata (I'm not sure on this last one as I haven't seen sales figures for it, but I haven't seen it mentioned in the various sales rankings leader boards I check every now and then on the internet). As for fan reception, Munto barely made a blip by KyoAni's standards, and Nichijou was somewhat polarizing (many loved it, some didn't get it at all).

FMP was done ages ago, as I pointed out earlier. The KyoAni of today is considerably different from the KyoAni that made FMP 8 or more years ago. FMP also never sold that well.

So that leaves Haruhi. The thing with Haruhi is that the the LNs themselves are a blending. Its darker and action-packed sections are maybe half of the narrative, while the more conventional high school-focused slice of life-esque sections are at least half of the narrative (maybe putting aside the most recent novels). The latter is well within KyoAni's comfort zone, so that gives them enough to work with. KyoAni going half-way towards darker action-packed material is fine here since the Haruhi LNs themselves are like that.

I'd be fine with KyoAni doing another Haruhi, but well-blended multi-genre narratives like that are rare gems in my view. So it's not something I'm holding out a lot of hope for, though I'd certainly be happy if KyoAni came across another Haruhi (or made one themselves).


Now, of the shows that KyoAni have had the most success with - Haruhi, K-On, the Key trio, Chuuni, Free!, and maybe Hyouka - It's not hard to see how all go well with the KyoAni filter (as Guardian Enzo brought up).

I think you raised some excellent points on Kyokai no Kanata and Tamako Market. I don't really fault KyoAni for "going for it" with these two shows. Tamako Market, in particular, made perfect sense given the success of K-On! with demographics that KyoAni never expected it to be successful with.

But just speaking as an anime fan with some interest in the anime industry, I can't ignore the pattern I see with KyoAni's shows. The closer they stick to their comfort zone, the more likely I am to like it, and the more likely the show is to sell well.

There's nothing necessarily wrong with being the best at something, and sticking to that. I used to think differently, but looking over KyoAni's full resume of works (and particularly their last 4 works), it's hard to escape the idea that they should stick to the types of content that they're clearly most comfortable with.
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Old 2014-01-05, 03:10   Link #2442
Kaisos Erranon
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Originally Posted by artesox View Post
Oh yes, I would like a little light on one issue: why people make such a big deal of everything Kyoto Animation does?
Because of Haruhi and to a lesser extent the KeyAni shows.
No, seriously. They're special, not just because their production values are on a different level than most other studios, but because they made several shows that are considered to be classics and trigger a lot of warm memories.
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Old 2014-01-05, 11:55   Link #2443
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
KyoAni's comfort zone has been discussed at length on various KyoAni threads, so I didn't think it would be a term that Anime Suki members would not get at this point. But, to be fair, I guess the fact that it's been discussed on various threads has resulted in the discussion being fragmented, so further elaboration might be helpful.

Guardian Enzo once wrote a post on the Kyokai no Kanata series thread that I think ties into a fairly common understanding of KyoAni's comfort zone. Here is his post. And now I will quote most of it...

"I equate it to a filter that every KyoAni show gets put through - like a special lens on the camera that tints everything in a certain way. Moe girls and cute, harmless boys, comedically sexy teacher types, falling leaves and cherry blossoms. It's certainly evident in a show like Free!, which despite the radical (for KyoAni) departure of five male leads, ends up looking and sounding exactly like the prototypical Kyoto Animation series with an extra piece of anatomy.

To what extent a Kyoto Animation show succeeds (artistically - commercial success is a near-certainty) probably depends on how well the material is suited to this treatment." - Guardian Enzo (bold emphasis mine)

I agree with this post. There is indeed a certain filter that just about every KyoAni show gets put through (FMP is an exception, but it's also quite old). This filter, by extension, determines KyoAni's comfort zone. The shows that fit this filter the best are the best shows for KyoAni to work with.

And not all shows fit that filter well. For example, Fate/Zero and Psycho-Pass would run almost entirely counter to it. So Fate/Zero and Psycho-Pass (and shows very much like them) do not fit well in KyoAni's comfort zone, and represent the types of content that KyoAni probably shouldn't bother dabbling in.
Enzo made a statement of his opinion. You agree with it and I disagree with the notion that there is a "comfort zone" in the first place.. Commercial success is never guaranteed in the anime industry regardless of revenue streams/trends/etc. Companies have to keep evolving to suit their customers and the contractors they employ have to evolve as well. The same points you say are present in "every successful KyoAni work" are present in many other shows as well; but why do we say one is successful and one is not? Two factors go into that: 1. personal enjoyment (which is 100% subjective and able to change) and 2. DVD/BD sales (because we don't get the full picture and people want to have an "objective" measure of quality for w/e reason).

To that extent, I highly disagree that Kyoto Animation could not output a series like Psycho-Pass or Fate/Zero. The idea that "KyoAni must moe-ify girls, have hot teachers, or unthreatening boys" in every show is idiotic at best. Do we say that Sunrise has to have giant mecha in every show to be successful? Do we say that ufotable has to partner with Aniplex/Type-Moon to be successful? No. Are they common in those works? Yes. Then why don't we say that those companies have "comfort zones" or lenses?

Easy. Because people want to complain about KyoAni because they don't like a show and they want them to do something else. We've seen people complaining about lack of Haruhi, Lucky Star, Nichijou, FMP, K-On!, action, dark, etc. Name something besides a CTFK work and there's likely a complaint KyoAni hasn't done it.

It's fine to not like a show; I've even commented a few posts back about my faults with Tamako and Kyoukai. It's also simply fine to post "I didn't like it. I expected something different from it and I didn't get that." To say they're horrible because they don't "apply a filter" or "fit in a comfort zone" is not looking at the actual problems and simply trying to fit the issues into your own preconceived bias.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
Wrong. I know well what I'm talking about. Half-assed is a very common term, and I'm using it correctly. Here is a link to an on-line definition of the term. Consistent with that definition, I am saying that when KyoAni ventures too far outside of their comfort zone, we start to see incompetency from them and their work. I used the term "half-assed" also because of the mental association that the term "half" can have. When watching Kyoukai no Kanata, I felt like KyoAni could only go half-way to being a truly dark, suspenseful, action-packed show. It couldn't go all the way to being a Shakugan no Shana or a Fate/Zero. And that's because it is very attached to its comfort zone; its filter as Guardian Enzo put it.

I had much the same experience with watching Tamako Market - That it was trying to appeal to two different sorts of potential viewers, and so it was only going half-way in trying to please either of them.

Instead of working with the type of content that KyoAni tends to go half-way with (due to their own stylistic tendencies that can run counter to certain types of content), I think that KyoAni should stick to what it's good at. I don't see anything unreasonable or overly harsh or "biased" about this position.
You have a horrible understanding of what half-assed actually is. Half-assed is A-1 Pictures screwing up their schedule and delivering an episode with a cut of only key animation and no in-betweens. Half-assed is a studio who can't schedule properly to avoid using pans/stills consistently in each episode. It's a studio who constantly puts 1-4 minutes of recap at the beginning or during each episode to avoid having to do new animation.

Tamako was more "overly ambitious" in what Yamada and Yoshida wanted to do. Yamada and Ishihara both honestly felt it could've been 4-cour long with the story she wanted to tell. How is that "half-assing" production? You say that they were trying to target two different audiences, but that's not the case. Yamada/Yoshida constantly talk about their desires to show a story about a community and the love that in there. There was no intention to "target" an audience or not, so your comments regarding that are fruitless.

I've gone into detail about the faults with Kyoukai in my previous post (last page), so I'll simply say your concept of KyoAni only being able to go "half-way" is inane due to an inability to consider directors/series composers (as proven earlier in this thread due to that derail). (Damn Hanada for sticking comedy too much.)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
This only supports my point, as Munto and Nichijou did poorly commercially by KyoAni's standards, as did Tamako Market and likely Kyokai no Kanata (I'm not sure on this last one as I haven't seen sales figures for it, but I haven't seen it mentioned in the various sales rankings leader boards I check every now and then on the internet). As for fan reception, Munto barely made a blip by KyoAni's standards, and Nichijou was somewhat polarizing (many loved it, some didn't get it at all).
The series you mention did poorly by "the international anime community's standards of what a KyoAni show should sell video disc-wise" not by "KyoAni's standards." I'll bold this because it's so important: We do not have access to financial documents showing how much revenue a show makes for a company. We have ESTIMATES on what a show's video discs sells from one company.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
FMP was done ages ago, as I pointed out earlier. The KyoAni of today is considerably different from the KyoAni that made FMP 8 or more years ago. FMP also never sold that well.
Again, I agree on one aspect of this "The KyoAni of today is considerably different from the KyoAni that made FMP 8 or more years ago" in a purely business sense as well as animation-quality sense. FMP was tracked at the beginning of Oricon's tracking of discs and is unreliably compared to what it does now. Again, we don't have financial data, so saying it "never sold that well" is pointless. (You're also ignoring that all three series were financed by TV stations as well, which don't really finance a lot of anime anymore.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
So that leaves Haruhi. The thing with Haruhi is that the the LNs themselves are a blending. Its darker and action-packed sections are maybe half of the narrative, while the more conventional high school-focused slice of life-esque sections are at least half of the narrative (maybe putting aside the most recent novels). The latter is well within KyoAni's comfort zone, so that gives them enough to work with. KyoAni going half-way towards darker action-packed material is fine here since the Haruhi LNs themselves are like that.

I'd be fine with KyoAni doing another Haruhi, but well-blended multi-genre narratives like that are rare gems in my view. So it's not something I'm holding out a lot of hope for, though I'd certainly be happy if KyoAni came across another Haruhi (or made one themselves).
Wait a minute. Haruhi blends action together with slice-of-life-esque sections... that kinda sounds like one of their recent shows/novels! (and delusional action in another series) I'm not saying Ishidate set out to replicate the success of Haruhi, but just saying how shows with similar elements can be different depending upon execution/details. Haruhi was groundbreaking for its time, but isn't anymore. There's multiple series with those elements in them; some are done well and some aren't. I wouldn't say it's a rare gem either; just one that hit at the right place/right time and was lucky. It takes years of planning and luck to get shows successful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
Now, of the shows that KyoAni have had the most success with - Haruhi, K-On, the Key trio, Chuuni, Free!, and maybe Hyouka - It's not hard to see how all go well with the KyoAni filter (as Guardian Enzo brought up).

I think you raised some excellent points on Kyokai no Kanata and Tamako Market. I don't really fault KyoAni for "going for it" with these two shows. Tamako Market, in particular, made perfect sense given the success of K-On! with demographics that KyoAni never expected it to be successful with.

But just speaking as an anime fan with some interest in the anime industry, I can't ignore the pattern I see with KyoAni's shows. The closer they stick to their comfort zone, the more likely I am to like it, and the more likely the show is to sell well.

There's nothing necessarily wrong with being the best at something, and sticking to that. I used to think differently, but looking over KyoAni's full resume of works (and particularly their last 4 works), it's hard to escape the idea that they should stick to the types of content that they're clearly most comfortable with.
Again, you're simply applying your own personal ideas to what these series have in common to say "this was a success, that wasn't" when there's magnitudes of other factors involved. Can you predict that their next show using their "comfort zone" will succeed? No, and you can't say that their next show appealing to a new audience won't succeed (according to international anime fan standards).

Most people in the fandom should look at things beyond BD/DVD numbers and see a bigger impact of how revenue goes back to the committee. I know the numbers are easier to make judgements on, but that doesn't mean they're actually correct.
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Old 2014-01-05, 12:47   Link #2444
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ultimatemegax View Post
Enzo made a statement of his opinion.
Which is a statement that is easily observable for anybody that has watched a solid majority or all of KyoAni's shows. There is a pattern of content there.

For an animation studio with a resume as large as KyoAni's, that predominant pattern of content clearly speaks to the creative tendencies and artistic preferences of the studio itself.


Quote:
To that extent, I highly disagree that Kyoto Animation could not output a series like Psycho-Pass or Fate/Zero.
On what basis do you think they could effectively do a show like Psycho-Pass or Fate/Zero? When have they ever did a show like that? FMP? FMP was ages ago.


Quote:
The idea that "KyoAni must moe-ify girls, have hot teachers, or unthreatening boys" in every show is idiotic at best.
It's not that they must have it. It's that this is what they clearly prefer to have, so they operate best with properties that have this sort of content already in place, and gelling well with the overall tone and mood of the show.


Quote:
Do we say that Sunrise has to have giant mecha in every show to be successful?
No, because of shows like Love Live!: School Idol Complex. Love Live! was a very well-received and commercially successful show, and there's nothing mecha-esque at all in it.

A hypothetical KyoAni comparable to this would in fact be a Fate/Zero or a Psycho-Pass or a serious mecha show in its recent resume (i.e. within the last 5 years). KyoAni simply doesn't have that.


Quote:
Do we say that ufotable has to partner with Aniplex/Type-Moon to be successful? No.
ufotable's resume is much smaller than KyoAni's so patterns within that resume aren't necessarily as definitive as patterns within KyoAni.


Quote:
Easy. Because people want to complain about KyoAni because they don't like a show and they want them to do something else.
That may have been the reason, or at least part of the reason, at one time. But no, KyoAni's resume really does speak for itself at this point.


Quote:
To say they're horrible because they don't "apply a filter" or "fit in a comfort zone" is not looking at the actual problems and simply trying to fit the issues into your own preconceived bias.
That's not exactly my argument anyway. I would argue that KyoAni has a very hard time playing certain types of content straight. It just goes against their creative tendencies. It would be like telling Gen Urobuchi to write a very upbeat slice of life show like K-On. It just goes completely against his creative tendencies.

KyoAni is like that, except on the studio level. They clearly have a creative tendency towards certain types of content. I'm not saying that's bad, I'm just saying it is what it is.


Quote:
You have a horrible understanding of what half-assed actually is.
No, I don't. Half-assed can apply to creative decisions just as assuredly as it can apply to the production issues that you raised.


Quote:
You say that they were trying to target two different audiences, but that's not the case.
Do you truly, honestly think that Tamako Market wasn't trying to tap into the K-On fanbase? I mean, just look at the character designs for Tamako's two closest friends. They are very reminiscent of Yui Hirasawa and Ritsu. Do you really think that's pure coincidence when Tamako Market was made by the same animation studio that adapted K-On into a highly successful anime?

Just because production committee members, or members of the creative team, don't explicitly spell something out doesn't mean it isn't going on.

That being said, sure, they were desiring to show a story about a community and the love that is in there. They were likely hoping it would appeal to a more general audience outside of otakus alone. That's one of the two target audiences I was referring to. The other being the part of the otaku audience that liked K-On.


Quote:
I've gone into detail about the faults with Kyoukai in my previous post (last page), so I'll simply say your concept of KyoAni only being able to go "half-way" is inane...
No, it's not. It's a studio pattern that's prevalent enough that it's bigger than any one Director alone.


Quote:
The series you mention did poorly by "the international anime community's standards of what a KyoAni show should sell video disc-wise" not by "KyoAni's standards." I'll bold this because it's so important: We do not have access to financial documents showing how much revenue a show makes for a company. We have ESTIMATES on what a show's video discs sells from one company.
And because we do not have said access, we can only work with the financial data that we in fact do have. The alternative would be for anime fans to ignore anime sales data entirely, but I doubt that's going to happen anytime soon.



Quote:
Again, I agree on one aspect of this "The KyoAni of today is considerably different from the KyoAni that made FMP 8 or more years ago" in a purely business sense as well as animation-quality sense.
Not only that, but some of their staff has changed over that time.


Quote:
Wait a minute. Haruhi blends action together with slice-of-life-esque sections... that kinda sounds like one of their recent shows/novels!
Kyoukai no Kanata is much more frequently dark and action-packed than Haruhi was.


Quote:
Haruhi was groundbreaking for its time, but isn't anymore. There's multiple series with those elements in them; some are done well and some aren't.
Which "multiple series" would these be? Which contain the same blend of genres as Haruhi does?


Quote:
I wouldn't say it's a rare gem either; just one that hit at the right place/right time and was lucky.
I guess we disagree then. Haruhi is a rare gem in my view.


Quote:

Again, you're simply applying your own personal ideas to what these series have in common to say "this was a success, that wasn't" when there's magnitudes of other factors involved. Can you predict that their next show using their "comfort zone" will succeed?
Not with 100% certainty, of course not. But predictions are almost never matters of 100% certainty. But would I feel pretty confident that KyoAni's next show using their comfort zone will succeed? Yes, I would.


Quote:
...and you can't say that their next show appealing to a new audience won't succeed (according to international anime fan standards).
Not definitively, no. But I can reasonably say that it's less likely to succeed than something that stays within KyoAni's comfort zone.

Well-established track records and resumes matter. And not everybody is going to interpret them as favorably as you do.
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Old 2014-01-05, 12:57   Link #2445
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You know, KyoAni's "resume" is actually quite small, next to the other studios that get a comparable amount of attention.
What you're identifying as elements of their "comfort zone" are tropes typical of modern high school (romantic) comedy anime, which almost all their works fall into in some fashion or another.
So, uh, you're wrong.
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Old 2014-01-05, 13:10   Link #2446
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Originally Posted by Kaisos Erranon View Post
You know, KyoAni's "resume" is actually quite small,
No, it's not. This is a fairly large resume of works. It's large enough for patterns to matter.


Quote:
What you're identifying as elements of their "comfort zone" are tropes typical of modern high school (romantic) comedy anime, which almost all their works fall into in some fashion or another.
That just supports my argument. Actually, you're arguably even going father than I am. You're basically saying that almost all of their works fall into the "modern high school (romantic) comedy" genre.

Sticking so much to a particular genre would obviously constitute having a comfort zone.

So no, I'm not wrong on this one.
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Old 2014-01-05, 13:16   Link #2447
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Originally Posted by ultimatemegax View Post
Then why don't we say that those companies have "comfort zones" or lenses?

Easy. Because people want to complain about KyoAni because they don't like a show and they want them to do something else.
You think it's just pure hate because people don't get their FMPs and Haruhis? You need to look beyond the whiney fanboys then. I'll give you a better reason: because the people that complain are sick to the bones of KyoAni's comfort zone. Sunrise is known as the mecha company, but they seldom produce good mecha, and good mecha is in short supply. This is not so much the fault of the company as is the fault of the genre. You can keep mecha contained to the usual tropes and you'll still be able to sell plastic models to that angsty teen with too much money. But the people in anticipation of the next big mecha series know that mecha has a couple of degrees larger potential for greatness than any of the genres KyoAni constantly retreats to, whereas KyoAni already "maxed out" on those genres. The people that buy KyoAni works are fans of those genres. KyoAni has done them so many times it's not strange at all that they are good at what they do and that their audience thinks they do a good job at it. But more importantly to this discussion, they go a step further and transform properties to fit their usual product, or they just go for properties that fit products that sold in the past. This is what is meant by lense or whatever ppl said. It's intentional that they retreat to these genres, because they know they will do them justice. That is the very definition of a comfort zone.
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Old 2014-01-05, 13:49   Link #2448
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Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
A hypothetical KyoAni comparable to this would in fact be a Fate/Zero or a Psycho-Pass or a serious mecha show in its recent resume (i.e. within the last 5 years). KyoAni simply doesn't have that.
Nichijou? Seriously, that show experimented a lot, it didn't "look" like KyoAni's other shows. And the occasional action scenes were much more intense and well-choreographed than Kyoukai no Kanata's. I wouldn't say it's the same type show as Lucky Star.

Too bad Nichijou sucked and bombed.
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Old 2014-01-05, 14:00   Link #2449
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Old 2014-01-05, 15:25   Link #2450
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So you'd rather have an objective production issue like cut corners rather than a subjective direction or scripting issue like "bad humor" or "crappy characters". Okay.
Personally I'd rather have neither.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
No, it's not. This is a fairly large resume of works. It's large enough for patterns to matter.




That just supports my argument. Actually, you're arguably even going father than I am. You're basically saying that almost all of their works fall into the "modern high school (romantic) comedy" genre.

Sticking so much to a particular genre would obviously constitute having a comfort zone.

So no, I'm not wrong on this one.
Seventeen TV series and two movies over 10 years is not a large resume. I'm not even sure what you're trying to argue by claiming that it is.

In any case, what Enzo was claiming was that those elements that make up the "comfort zone"/"lens"/"allergen" are something unique to KyoAni. They aren't, and for that matter highschool comedies or romantic comedies make up a pretty sizeable percentage of the anime released each year.
KyoAni is not special in this regard. They -are- special in that they do very little else, but that doesn't mean that they couldn't or that if they did, it would be bad.
Kyokai is mediocre for reasons that have nothing to do with these magical "filters" of yours.
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Old 2014-01-05, 16:05   Link #2451
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaisos Erranon View Post
So you'd rather have an objective production issue like cut corners rather than a subjective direction or scripting issue like "bad humor" or "crappy characters". Okay.
Whether something is objectively bad or subjectively bad doesn't matter much to the person who considers it subjectively bad. For that individual, they're both simply bad.

The question is which bad is less tolerable - production cut corners, or issues like bad humor and crappy characters.

With the admitted exception of recap episodes (which I do loathe), I'd take production cut corners over bad humor and crappy characters if forced to choose one or the other.

A good recent example of this "choice" is Kill La Kill vs. Kyoukai no Kanata. Of the two, I'm with Tempester, I prefer Kill La Kill.


Quote:
Personally I'd rather have neither.
I agree with you here.


Quote:
Seventeen TV series and two movies over 10 years is not a large resume.
It's larger than some studios, even ones raised in this thread (like ufotable). Most importantly, it's large enough.


Quote:

In any case, what Enzo was claiming was that those elements that make up the "comfort zone"/"lens"/"allergen" are something unique to KyoAni. They aren't, and for that matter highschool comedies or romantic comedies make up a pretty sizeable percentage of the anime released each year.
KyoAni is not special in this regard. They -are- special in that they do very little else,
Thank you.


Quote:
...but that doesn't mean that they couldn't or that if they did, it would be bad.
Well, we can look at their track record with shows that are a little outside the comfort zone, or "specialization", for them. And their track record with such shows is not that great, in my view.

Does that mean they can't possibly do a good show outside of their comfort zone/specialization? Of course not. But it does leave me a bit skeptical of the idea.

Meanwhile, I'm quite confident that they can do shows like Chuuni and Free! well. They've proven themselves there.


Quote:
Kyokai is mediocre for reasons that have nothing to do with these magical "filters" of yours.
I disagree. The humor in KnK really undermined it, in my view. And that humor is very much in line with the KyoAni filter. And I know that much of this humor is not in the source material.
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Old 2014-01-05, 16:11   Link #2452
erneiz_hyde
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Originally Posted by Kaisos Erranon View Post
Seventeen TV series and two movies over 10 years is not a large resume. I'm not even sure what you're trying to argue by claiming that it is.
It isn't? by math alone it means they averaging in release about 2 works within a year, each year, for 10 years. What's your definition of large resume then?
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Old 2014-01-05, 22:50   Link #2453
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