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View Poll Results: Code Geass: Akito the Exiled OVA - Episode 2 Rating
Perfect 10 12 25.00%
9 out of 10 : Excellent 11 22.92%
8 out of 10 : Very Good 9 18.75%
7 out of 10 : Good 10 20.83%
6 out of 10 : Average 3 6.25%
5 out of 10 : Below Average 1 2.08%
4 out of 10 : Poor 1 2.08%
3 out of 10 : Bad 0 0%
2 out of 10 : Very Bad 0 0%
1 out of 10 : Painful 1 2.08%
Voters: 48. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 2014-01-26, 22:49   Link #421
Kusaja
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Oh, I see.

Anyone on the Internet who has said anything remotely positive about Akito is a blind Code Geass fanboy or fangirl, right?

Anyone who dares to pay attention to anything else in Akito is wrong, and anyone who says Julius Kingsley ruins everything is right, no?

Somehow, Akito the Exiled must be just as bad as Twilight or even worse! Quality is only measured by the presence or absence of Lelouch!

Man, it's sad how you're really so full of yourself to believe that. But I guess it's natural since you ignore anything that doesn't fit your worldview.

Last edited by Kusaja; 2014-01-26 at 23:05.
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Old 2014-01-26, 23:26   Link #422
GundamFan0083
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kusaja View Post
Oh, I see.

Man, it's sad how you're really so full of yourself to believe that. But I guess it's natural since you ignore anything that doesn't fit your worldview.

No you don't see, and that's the problem.
If you did see, then you'd understand my position and realize my point (that I made in 2009) was correct.
Is Lelouch in Akito?
Yes.
Does that lessen the quality?
In my opinion, yes.
Does it matter to me that others find it enjoyable and don't care?
Not in the least.
I'm not attacking anyone here for liking it.
I didn't even attack you for liking it.
But you seem incapable of extending the same courtesy.
So, you were taken to task on the issue of what is, or is not, my opinion and the facts that back up my opinion.
Pretty simple.
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Old 2014-01-26, 23:28   Link #423
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I think his problem is that they're trying to have it both ways with Akito. A work not about Lelouch that ends up having Lelouch anyways.
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Old 2014-01-26, 23:29   Link #424
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Agreed, and that is another excellent point.
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Old 2014-01-27, 00:49   Link #425
Kusaja
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Originally Posted by azul120 View Post
I think his problem is that they're trying to have it both ways with Akito. A work not about Lelouch that ends up having Lelouch anyways.
Sure. They want to create something different enough to be a fresh experience, but don't want to completely alienate fans of Lelouch either.

And my response to that is...well, why can't they have it both ways? There's no law in the books forbidding this. Only conflicting opinions.

Code Geass, as an entire property, is basically the poster child for appealing to different audiences for different reasons at the same time.

Last edited by Kusaja; 2014-01-27 at 01:02.
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Old 2014-01-30, 07:06   Link #426
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Hmmm..... what if Julius Kingsley is a plot twist. CG is really plot twist-y IMO, so I'm may not be surprised if it turns out that he is not Lelouch

Also, Sunrise and/or the director and staff didn't confirm Julius as Lelouch yet (though the situation really fits). Julius might be a clone (in reference of Rolo in NoN) or maybe a long, lost twin brother (a plot twist... i guess) who is seperated by birth! -le gasp-

.....Or a guy who coincidentially looked like the bratty prince (but that was the least plausible, I know)
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Old 2014-01-30, 12:15   Link #427
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Originally Posted by captain_lecho View Post
Hmmm..... what if Julius Kingsley is a plot twist. CG is really plot twist-y IMO, so I'm may not be surprised if it turns out that he is not Lelouch

Also, Sunrise and/or the director and staff didn't confirm Julius as Lelouch yet (though the situation really fits). Julius might be a clone (in reference of Rolo in NoN) or maybe a long, lost twin brother (a plot twist... i guess) who is seperated by birth! -le gasp-

.....Or a guy who coincidentially looked like the bratty prince (but that was the least plausible, I know)
The Nightmare spinoff manga already beat you to that. It has some kind of Lelouch clone-twin whose identity is unknown to most of his relatives.
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Old 2014-01-31, 05:57   Link #428
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Originally Posted by amaterasu4 View Post
The Nightmare spinoff manga already beat you to that. It has some kind of Lelouch clone-twin whose identity is unknown to most of his relatives.
Yes I know, in fact, I was sad for Rolo (Lelouch's clone twin).

But hey, there is really a possibility that Julius may not be Lelouch. (because I would be disappointed if it was really him).
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Old 2014-02-01, 09:01   Link #429
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Originally Posted by captain_lecho View Post
Yes I know, in fact, I was sad for Rolo (Lelouch's clone twin).

But hey, there is really a possibility that Julius may not be Lelouch. (because I would be disappointed if it was really him).
No chance for that.
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Old 2014-02-11, 00:35   Link #430
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Somewhere, I am positive that Lelouch is figuratively sitting in some extra-temporal plane laughing his ass off at the utter irony that he has dominated 80% of this 22 page long thread, not because he even put forth enough effort to attract a crowd of ogling fans, but ironically only because his mere presence is so despised that the same fear that fans will put him on a pedestal has now been turned into the main point of conversation for the Akito Series.

Well then, GundamFan was right after all: even though the series isn't about Lelouch, even though he was barely even present, the fandom has done its job and turned the main focus onto Lelouch anyway, albeit in the opposite way expected. A self-fulfilling prophecy.



Negative publicity is good publicity. Especially for Lelouch.

Last edited by Zero Gravity; 2014-02-11 at 00:50.
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Old 2014-02-12, 15:25   Link #431
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Honestly, Zero Gravity, that's an amusing thought but also a bit of a stretch.

Sometimes people tend to get carried away, myself included, but reactions to the episode have been mostly positive rather than negative, overall, and even Lelouch has been relatively well-received in general, so let's not try to magnify the negativity just because of a couple of circular exchanges between a handful of fans (again, including me). It's not like the Japanese on 2ch, for instance, are all the same as us.

But moving on...for those interested, there's a couple of interviews I've been meaning to get translated and post here.

Keep an eye out for that in the near-future, unless we somehow get any kind of Akito 3 information sooner rather than later.

Last edited by Kusaja; 2014-02-12 at 15:36.
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Old 2014-02-21, 15:48   Link #432
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Here's the first part of a very long interview with the director published in Product Works (September 2013).

Quote:
Director
Akane Kazuki Interview


Director Akane Kazuki, creator of another “Code Geass” world with “Akito the Exiled.” What kinds of experiences did he have producing this new work? He speaks at large with us from his thoughts on the work to the production behind the scenes and the second chapter sequel.

-------

Profile
Anime director. Born on March 24, 1962 in Osaka. Main works include “The Vision of Escaflowne” (director), “Noein: To Your Other Self” (creator, director, series construction), “Birdy the Mighty DECODE” (director).


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When they first asked me to direct the project, I thought “why me?”

Do you remember when Producer Kawaguchi (Kawaguchi Yoshitaka, affiliated with Sunrise, producer of Code Geass from its inception) asked you to participate in his series?

It was actually quite a while ago. It was when I was working on the retakes of the “Birdy the Mighty DECODE:02” package. It must have been in 2009. (Director Akane Kazuki ‘s previous work, “Birdy the Mighty DECODE:02” ran on TV until March 2009, and the DVD final volume went on sale in July 2009).

At that point in time, what was your impression of “Code Geass” (“Lelouch of the Rebellion” ran on TV until September 2008)?

I had of course heard of the title, but to be honest, I had hardly seen any of it (laughs). I think I had seen 1 or 2 episodes, but even then, I was so surprised that CLAMP were doing original anime character designs. I was amazed that they were drawing such intense characters with their personal touch and all for a TV series. Furthermore, they drew all of the mechanical action so well by hand. The first time I saw it, more than being impressed I was like don’t go to this extent just for a TV series! I thought about calling a foul on Sunrise (said with a laugh).

(Interviewer laughs as well)

I was envious of them though because here I was struggling with scheduling issues and budget issues while battling this war of nerves, and they had a quantitative strategy like the American military and were investing a large amount of superior staff members into the project.

So in the midst of all that they came to you requesting your direction on the project?

Yes, at first it was Producer Kawaguchi who came to me and said, “We’d like to create an extra edition as an OVA, so can we ask you to do it?” Back when I was at Sunrise quite a long time ago, Producer Kawaguchi and I actually worked a bit together with his working on production progress and my working on staging.

So at first, I really thought “why me?” I said to them even if Taniguchi Goro can’t do it, he has so many young staff members like him, and they’d probably be better off if one of them took charge.

But Producer Kawaguchi said something to the effect of, “I’d like to add some new blood to the project, and I want you to do it.” He told me that he just didn’t want to create a simple extension of “Lelouch of the Rebellion”; rather, he wanted to end the current storyline and introduce new elements that would take the series to a new world called “Code Geass,” so I told him if that was the case then maybe I could do it—and that was when I thought that I’d like to give it a try.

Director Akane, from the challenge of first producing your own work up through your most recent creation, “Birdy the Mighty DECODE” and its sequel “DECODE:02,”(both of them based on Yuki Masami's manga) you had consistently worked on your own original productions, so what did you think about inheriting an already popular series with “Code Geass?

Yes, certainly I had only been producing original work the whole time, and I did have the feeling inside of what would it mean now to “do sumo wrestling in another person’s belt” in regards to originality. Also, when they first opened discussions with me, they did express concern to me saying, “We want to avoid having Akane-san’s brand looked at in a lesser light if you do ‘Code Geass.’”

It just so happened, though, that right around that time, I had started to feel within myself that I had hit a wall in regards to the direction of my work (laughs). Conversely, I wondered how far I could take another original work, and I think I was looking for a new challenge, so in those terms, I was able to tackle it with a positive attitude.

So working on an existing product or draft was going to be a challenge for you then?

I’d say that’s correct. But looking back now, “The Vision of Escaflowne” (Director Akane’s debut production in 1996) was close to “Code Geass.” “Escaflowne” was based on the work of Kawamori (Shoji) and I put various thoughts into creating the views of that world. So just like back then, I felt that I would be able to move in the direction of expanding this new world as far as my limits would take me while respecting the rules of “Code Geass.” Yet, as usual, Sunrise gave me nothing but bothersome work…I was like give me something easier and more desirable (laughs).

In regards to taking over direction on that work, did you have any back and forth with the likes of Director Taniguchi Goro or Okouchi Ichiro (Taniguchi Goro directed “Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion” and “R2”, and Okouchi Ichiro constructed both series)?

We really didn’t have any collaboration. It was pretty much introducing ourselves and saying, “Nice to meet you.” Both Director Taniguchi and Okouchi-san’s stance was “we’ll leave it up to you,” and I was really grateful to them for that position.

I heard that Director Taniguchi was your junior when you were doing production and development at Sunrise.

Yes, that’s correct. He came to Sunrise about three years after me, but I was working at the #2 Studio while he was in the #7 Studio, so we had met each other and talked a few times, but that was the extent of it. At the time, we did no collaborating together. The first time I really sat down and talked with him was when we went to America for the Anime Expo (a convention held in California in 2003 where both were guest participants for Director Taniguchi’s “Planetes” and Director Akane’s “Heat Guy J”). He happened to come at the same time, and so it was there that we had our first real chat.

-------
The historical “what if” and the Japanese person who lost his homeland

After assuming director duties, what was your impression when you took another look at “Code Geass”?

On the whole, my impression was that it was a production packed with elements that the viewers wanted to see providing plenty of twists and turns. And not only did it flatter the viewers, but it maintained such a strong core while factoring in meticulous details. I was really impressed. I thought it was quite different from a production that you watch for a year or two and then just forget about.

In regards to the world in the story, what was your first approach in how you would inherit what was already there?

When Producer Kawaguchi first approached me, I don’t think he wanted me to just carry on in the same direction as Director Taniguchi and Okouchi-san; rather, I think he meant for me to look at their work and then create my own axis based on my visceral reaction. In that sense, the aspect that stuck with me the most after watching “Code Geass” was the setting of “a world of what if.”

The “Code Geass” world is based on a fictional history of Britannia crossing over to a new continent and not establishing the United States of America but instead the construction of “The Holy Britannian Empire.” That concept was interesting.

In regards to the near future, it’s not a future based on complete fiction, and it’s not a future that’s just an extension of our current world. At some point in history, “something” changed creating a divergent future towards a different path. It’s closer to a fictional chronicle of war or a historical simulation wouldn’t you say?

“Noein: To Your Other Self” (produced by Director Akane in 2005) was also the same because I really like divergent worlds and themes of parallel worlds. I think the world of “Code Geass” also falls under that classification.

What was your reason for staging it in Europe—referred to in the production as E.U. (European Union)?

In reality, I had thoughts about staging the work in Japan, but I thought it might be difficult to maintain consistency with “Lelouch of the Rebellion” (laughs). The producers also gave me their suggestion, so at that point I thought I would consider Europe and the E.U. From there, my feeling of “what if” came into play as I came up with the idea, “What if the French Revolution really got out of control…” Due to the French Revolution, the radical people’s revolution changed all of Europe to a degree, and executions like what happened to Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette became a common occurrence all over the place causing royalty to panic and flee Europe seeking asylum in Britannia. And that’s the kind of setting I tried to create.

Also, for the last 10 years or so, I’ve been absorbed in the history of the Roman Empire. Rome began as a monarchy, but a backlash against that led to a republic. In other words, a kind of democratic political system was born with a parliamentary system made up of the Roman senate and prominent lawmakers. After that, Rome transitioned to an empire when they could no longer politically maintain the vast expansion of territory, but when the empire came to the end of its road, Rome was destroyed which led to the Middle Ages throughout Europe. You could argue that Rome was the birthplace of Europe and even America. That really fascinated me, and the more I learned about Rome, the more I was able to comprehend European culture, art, and of course their political systems.

For this work, you cast the setting of “Code Geass” in the country called E.U. or European Union, so are you saying in the history of that country that the image of the Roman Empire’s history is duplicated?

It’s often said that Japan’s democratic system was “conceived” by outsiders after the war, so the Japanese people are quite indifferent regarding the reasons for transitioning political systems and the meaning and origins of democracy. I do get the sense now though that the younger generation is gradually showing more interest in politics than we did at that age, so if that element becomes more ingrained then things could get interesting. I think one of the themes of this work is the subject of how far can “the relationship between the individual and country” be depicted more in entertainment.

Along those lines, one more characteristic of the “Code Geass” world is a setting where “a country called Japan is invaded, destroyed, and referred to as ‘Area 11’.” This idea felt incredibly attractive to me.

In actual history, Japan has never experienced the outright loss of its country, but there are many examples of that happening in Europe are there not?

That’s right as terrible as it is. And “Lelouch of the Rebellion” was actually depicted as a historical “what if.” The setting of “Japan disappearing” where ghettos and settlements emerged and depicting “former Japanese people now called Eleven” being treated as second class and third class citizens brought a more dramatic effect.

I wanted to advance that theme a bit more and pose the question of what would the Japanese people do if they lost the country of Japan? Also, how would that be viewed around the world? I thought that I’d be able to create a story by implementing that point of view.

So from a view of the “Code Geass” world, you were attempting to extract points of interest and concern to you personally, weave them into the theme of the story, and then spread it throughout the work?

That might be a good way of saying it. It’s just hard, though, taking things beyond that point (laughs). I do find a direction that I want to go in, but then how do I incorporate that into the flow created from “Lelouch of the Rebellion”…how do I integrate well the “Code Geass” world and the world that I want to depict? That part required a great deal of trial and error. They told me to “take it in the direction I wanted,” and I had every intention of taking it in my direction (laughs), but I wanted to place great importance on the fact that I was still carrying on the title of “Code Geass.” If I was a fan of “Code Geass,” and it turned into a production with a different “smell” to it, I’m quite sure I wouldn’t have been pleased. So in those terms, it took quite a while before I was able to grasp that feeling of “okay, I can go in this direction!”

While we’re on the subject, at first we had “Gaiden” in the title, and it was going to be called “Code Geass Gaiden: Akito the Exiled,” but I just had doubts about it (laughs). In the end, I was the one who first suggested, “It’s okay if we remove Gaiden from the title isn’t it?” and from there I gradually started to get more confident in my direction.

In reference to your statement, “I can go in this direction,” at what moment did you grasp that feeling?

The visual aspect of that was quite large. CLAMP drew a character for me, and when I saw it I thought, “Oh yes, that’s the feel I want,” and then Kimura-san (Takahiro) produced a table of characters used for Anime, and I thought at that point, “I think I can do it with this character.” We then began to create concurrent mechanical action using Orange and 3D computer graphics, and once we had a Knightmare Frame movie piece put together and I saw it, I realized that “We could indeed create a new atmosphere that would work.”

We of course needed a theme and view of the world we’d create, and you have to consider various theories, but in the end, animation is visual. Once I was hooked on the visual piece, I began to see the chances for success thinking, “With this, I think we now have something that people will watch as ‘Code Geass.’”
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Old 2014-02-22, 17:43   Link #433
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That's nice I went here to check how the OVA was and spoiled myself after reading that Lelouch is somehow back :-\

Feels like playing FF7 act2 spot Aeris in your party,talk to her and the first thing she says is "sorry Cloud,Sephiroth killed my clone,you and he were under my sharigan-thingy influence and none noticed"
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Old 2014-02-22, 19:53   Link #434
Kusaja
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For those interested, I'll be posting the translations for the other parts of that interview and more as they become available.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverkite View Post
That's nice I went here to check how the OVA was and spoiled myself after reading that Lelouch is somehow back :-\

Feels like playing FF7 act2 spot Aeris in your party,talk to her and the first thing she says is "sorry Cloud,Sephiroth killed my clone,you and he were under my sharigan-thingy influence and none noticed"
Perhaps you haven't fully realized it, but this OVA isn't a sequel.

S1 -> Akito -> R2

It's a side story that takes place during the one year time skip right between both seasons.

So nobody is being revived from the dead or anything like that.
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Old 2014-02-22, 21:30   Link #435
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Originally Posted by Kusaja View Post

So nobody is being revived from the dead or anything like that.
Thanks for the interview translation, interesting to see this little tidbit.

"Both Director Taniguchi and Okouchi-san’s stance was “we’ll leave it up to you,” and I was really grateful to them for that position."

Retcon anyone?
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Old 2014-02-22, 23:26   Link #436
Kusaja
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That was also their attitude about other previous spin-off materials. Mamoru Iwasa's light novel adaptation of the original series had an afterword commentary by Taniguchi, where he also says that it's alright to leave everything up to Mr. Iwasa and his interpretations of the story. I think that just means they're totally okay with letting the new creators take charge and don't see the need to get directly involved. Incidentally, the last Geass-related thing Taniguchi did was work on a couple of the extra materials for the BD box sets.
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Old 2014-02-23, 00:59   Link #437
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Actually Goro Taniguichi is directing/co-writing Renya of the Darkness. Which is a manga that is a part of the official timeline of the Code Geass anime and is thus canon within the Code Geass world, unlike the other side materials.

http://myanimelist.net/manga.php?id=17311
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Old 2014-02-23, 02:29   Link #438
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Originally Posted by Kusaja View Post
Here's the first part of a very long interview with the director published in Product Works (September 2013).
Wow, really its nice to see something from the director. Will there be more?
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Old 2014-02-23, 11:08   Link #439
Kusaja
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Originally Posted by captain_lecho View Post
Wow, really its nice to see something from the director. Will there be more?
Yes, that's certainly the plan. The interview is long enough that it'll take a fair amount of time to translate everything though.

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Originally Posted by GundamFan0083 View Post
Actually Goro Taniguichi is directing/co-writing Renya of the Darkness. Which is a manga that is a part of the official timeline of the Code Geass anime and is thus canon within the Code Geass world, unlike the other side materials.

http://myanimelist.net/manga.php?id=17311
It slipped my mind, but in Japan Renya has been over for several months. The final collected volume was published back in September.

https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/new...d-in-september

It's certainly the only manga that can be considered to be part of the same anime time line, yes, as weird as some of its contents are.

And indeed, Taniguchi is credited for coming up with the original script for the manga. But I think his work for the BD box sets is more recent.

The first Code Geass BD box set was also released in September of last year and the second box set for R2 will be released on March 26th.

http://www.geass.jp/r2/bluray_box.html

There's a new picture drama and a couple of new audio commentaries included, which would be interesting to hear.

Last edited by Kusaja; 2014-02-23 at 11:54.
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Old 2014-02-23, 17:04   Link #440
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It slipped my mind, but in Japan Renya has been over for several months. The final collected volume was published back in September.

https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/new...d-in-september

It's certainly the only manga that can be considered to be part of the same anime time line, yes, as weird as some of its contents are.

And indeed, Taniguchi is credited for coming up with the original script for the manga. But I think his work for the BD box sets is more recent.

The first Code Geass BD box set was also released in September of last year and the second box set for R2 will be released on March 26th.

http://www.geass.jp/r2/bluray_box.html

There's a new picture drama and a couple of new audio commentaries included, which would be interesting to hear.
I stand corrected.
The BD is newer.

Indeed, it will be interesting to see the new picture drama and audio commentary.
I look forward to it.
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