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Old 2014-04-14, 08:56   Link #3741
Zakoo
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Hellow, got a question today.

So I was reading, and the hero just say "Yate minakya wakaranai".
It was translated as "We won't know if we don't try"

But I thought that the "nakya" form was a way of saying "we have to do ..."
So strictly speaking, should that be translated as "we have do do it, or we won't know."?

Somehow I'm quite confused for the nakucha et nakya form, sometimes they add ikemasen or narimasen behind and that still hold the same meaning like :

Ikanakucha ! (According to what I learnt it's supposed to say "I have to go"))
Ikanakucha ikemasen ! ( According to translation, it still says "I have to go" but that simply feels wrong ... for me. I got this wrong or error somewhere ?)

Thanks for saving me again.
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Old 2014-04-14, 09:21   Link #3742
erneiz_hyde
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zakoo View Post
"We won't know if we don't try"
"we have do do it, or we won't know."?
They mean the same thing.
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Old 2014-04-14, 09:35   Link #3743
Seitsuki
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The form in use in the first example is しないと which basically means 'unless x'. Yatte minaito wakaranai = If we don't try we won't know.

The second is しなければなりません, meaning 'have to do x'. Ikenakereba narimasen = I have to go.

The trick is understanding all the different contractions or speaking styles and narrowing it down to the root grammar structure.
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Old 2014-04-14, 09:46   Link #3744
Kirihara_R
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Well , I dont know if this a proper explanation since I'm really not that great at japanese .. but yeah Its another different form , so for the "yatte minakya wakaranai" I think the "conditional form" has been used ..which in polite form can be also be "yatte minakereba wakarimasen or Yaranakereba Wakarimasen" ,these two is basically the same but the "nakya" is more casual or normal way of speaking or "futsuu" .. and these form are different from "we have to do it " in japanese "Yatte minaito" or Yaranakya naranai form ..

and as for the Ikanakucha/ Ikanakya ( I have to go ) thats correct , but for Ikanakya ikemasen they basically the same but this one is more polite I think.. ..

As long its not "Ittewa Ikemasen"

I hope this can help .. but to be sure ,ask also the others for opinions or wait for another explanation..
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Old 2014-07-08, 09:03   Link #3745
Zakoo
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Hello, a new problem arose for me, I don't manage to understand the differences between :

-Wake ni wa ikanai

-Wake ni mo ikanai

According to some website, the first one means "Because of A I canno't do B" and the second is "because of A I have to do B", though the exemple taken is :



Meaning : Doing it alone will be hard, but since everybody is busy there's no way I can receive help. The exemple doesn't even follow the grammatical law, did I misunderstand something ?

Thanks guys, you save me as always.
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Old 2014-07-08, 09:23   Link #3746
erneiz_hyde
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From my understanding, the first one stands by itself, while the second one have a different first clause, just like in that example.
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Old 2014-07-09, 18:02   Link #3747
Avatar of Dreams
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zakoo View Post
Hello, a new problem arose for me, I don't manage to understand the differences between :

-Wake ni wa ikanai

-Wake ni mo ikanai

According to some website, the first one means "Because of A I canno't do B" and the second is "because of A I have to do B"
You misunderstood the website (This one right?).

"I cannot do B" is when you use the dictionary/root form of a verb in front of "wake ni wa/mo ikanai" like in your example sentence.
"I have to do B" (literally "I cannot not do B") is when you use the negative form of a verb in front of "wake ni wa/mo ikanai".

The website formatting is poor but it defines these under A) and B).

Using "mo" instead of "wa" in this phrase just means there is something else you can't do/have to do (that may or may not have been mentioned in a previous sentence).
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Old 2014-07-10, 07:32   Link #3748
Zakoo
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Hahaha, thanks a lot guys, Indeed it's this website and I misunderstood it. That helps a lot, those sentences are used a lot in light novel so it was kind of bothersome to not fully understand everything.

Arigatou.
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Old 2014-07-19, 21:05   Link #3749
Dopplegeist
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I would like to write "A bird flying through the sky gazes over the sea". I am having a lot of trouble with the word particles, the verb tenses (use of suru?) and the word order.

toki / Time
umi / Sea
見下ろす miorosu / To look down upon
sora / Sky
飛ばす tobasu / To fly
tori / Bird

What I've tried...

鳥が飛ばすを空 (The bird flies through the sky)

見下ろを海 (Overlooking the sea?)

I do not know how to unite these sentences either. I would appreciate some guidance.

DG
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Old 2014-07-19, 22:19   Link #3750
Cosmic Eagle
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空を飛ばしている鳥が海を見下ろす

would be the simplest and most literal in the absence of any context and using the words you want to work with

BTW when using を what comes after is the 他動詞 verb, or noun with verb phrase, not a single noun alone.....at least I have never seen a single noun alone used with that particle
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Old 2014-07-20, 11:55   Link #3751
erneiz_hyde
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I think 飛ばしている is a wrong form to use there.

飛んでる makes more sense
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Old 2014-07-20, 19:14   Link #3752
Cosmic Eagle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erneiz_hyde View Post
I think 飛ばしている is a wrong form to use there.

飛んでる makes more sense
している describes state of being right? So shouldn't it be applicable to bird's state of being in flight?
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Old 2014-07-20, 19:24   Link #3753
sneaker
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I think the problem is that "飛ばす" might not the correct or best verb in the first place as opposed to "飛ぶ".

According to Wictionary:
飛ばす to let fly; to send flying; to throw
飛ぶ to fly

So 飛んで(い)る should be correct.

Though jisho.org says 飛ばす also means "to fly"...

Last edited by sneaker; 2014-07-20 at 20:56.
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Old 2014-07-20, 22:54   Link #3754
Avatar of Dreams
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
I think the problem is that "飛ばす" might not the correct or best verb in the first place as opposed to "飛ぶ".

According to Wictionary:
飛ばす to let fly; to send flying; to throw
飛ぶ to fly

So 飛んで(い)る should be correct.

Though jisho.org says 飛ばす also means "to fly"...
"To fly" like in "to fly a kite" as in the definition:
1 空中を飛ぶようにする。「模型飛行機を―・す」「風船を―・す」
飛ぶ is indeed the correct verb for Dopplegeist's sentence.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmic Eagle View Post
BTW when using を what comes after is the 他動詞 verb, or noun with verb phrase, not a single noun alone.....at least I have never seen a single noun alone used with that particle
No, this is not always the case. を has multiple uses aside from the common direct object marking. See here.
Using the sentence above as an example I could say 空を飛んでいる and that would be fine despite 飛ぶ being an intransitive verb.
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Old 2014-08-09, 20:10   Link #3755
Dopplegeist
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In anime/manga I have heard ワープ much common for anything involving FTL, versus 瞬間移動 the official term for teleportation. Anime Dragonball Z uses 瞬間移動 but it seems to be the only one, why is this? Because ワープ is shorter, easier to say?
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Old 2014-08-21, 07:45   Link #3756
Yu Ominae
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Need to check this out:

Quote:
楽しょうぜ
I heard this somewhere. Not sure what it is in English.
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Old 2014-08-21, 08:03   Link #3757
erneiz_hyde
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Perhaps it meant 楽勝 (rakushou)? If it is, then it means "easy win", "simple", things like that.
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Old 2014-08-21, 21:52   Link #3758
Dopplegeist
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From One Piece Wikia:

Quote:
Hyakuhachi Pound Ho (百八煩悩(ポンド)鳳 Hyakuhachi Pondo Hō?, kanji meaning "Phoenix of the 108 Earthly Desires"; furigana meaning "108 Pound Phoenix/Cannon")

The attack's name is actually a very heavy pun it is written out as "Phoenix of the 108 Earthly Desires" in the manga with a skewed reading attached that makes it "108 Pound Hō" when read out. Ho means both "cannon" (砲 Hō?) and "phoenix" (鳳 Hō?), however the attached kanji is for "phoenix", making that the literal translation and the "cannon" reading a pun on that, both of which are correct. The "pound" part is a skewed reading of the kanji for "earthly desires" (煩悩 Bonnō?), and it is referring to the caliber of a cannon (a 108 Caliber Cannon would fire a 108 Pound Ball).
What is skewed reading? How can 煩悩 be pronounced ポンド? I don't see it.
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Old 2014-08-21, 21:59   Link #3759
erneiz_hyde
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煩悩 is pronounced 'bonnou'. It can be skewed somewhat to kinda sounds like 'paundo'. It doesn't mean it's actually read as paundo.
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Old 2014-08-22, 21:52   Link #3760
Dopplegeist
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石像鬼

Is this pronounce, sekizōki? Is Chinese term for "gargoyle" so I assume 鬼 pronounced with onyomi, but not sure.
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