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Old 2006-05-25, 12:01   Link #81
Dnous
wut
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
I wonder how i joined these groups in im then >_>.

Last edited by Dnous; 2006-05-25 at 14:17.
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Old 2006-05-25, 15:17   Link #82
LytHka
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You got lucky?
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Old 2006-05-25, 15:46   Link #83
tritoch
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Chi-town
gotta have teh skillz
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Old 2006-05-25, 17:34   Link #84
LytHka
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What skills? All you need to *have* is a fast line, all you need to *follow* is uguu.org's guide on how to set-up Share and Winny and all you need to do is to *browse* sites like ANN and anidb, *copy* the Japanese title of the show, *paste* it into Winny and search when the RAWs air! I don't call these skills.

May I add... RAW providing as a job only existed because RAWs were either too expensive (DVDs, LDs) or because only a few were lucky enough to get access to shinbiro and other sources. When Winny and later Share came, RAW providing existed as long as RAW providers kept their two sources secret. I remember the time when kj1980 was on this forum preaching to us that Winny's author never intended us gaijins to leech from it. It was around then that a few people who knew about Winny started spamming this place with the guide on how to set it up. It was done out of spite. Basically, RAW providing existed as long as RAW providers kept their mouths shut. That is no longer. I'm convinced that both of these P2P programs have an English wikipedia article.
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Old 2006-05-25, 18:06   Link #85
getfresh
done
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Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Yokosuka, JP
Age: 33
lol... how to set it up? There use to be english overlay files for winny and winmx way back in 2002 ^_^. I think ppl use to link it in some channel where all of us get together can make fun of each other (you know which one ;p). But thats besides the point, learn to time, or if you have the english backround edit.
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Old 2006-05-30, 15:19   Link #86
Quarkboy
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Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Age: 34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladholyman
Wait, you shouldn't translate more than one show at a time? Oh crap.
At FIRST.... after the translator has experience, milk him/her for all they're worth .
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Old 2006-05-30, 17:16   Link #87
Sylf
翻訳家わなびぃ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quarkboy
At FIRST.... after the translator has experience, milk him/her for all they're worth .
Let them go through several years of college level Japanese classes, get them trained, then milk them to death, dispose of them within 2 months since their debut, then replace them with more fresh translators. They're becoming dime a dozen anymore anyways. That sounds like a real plan. And an easy way for some of us to getting in to fansubbing - a real college education is all it takes! (You don't have to RTFM on your own, you don't have to teach yourself... what a bargain!)
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Old 2006-05-30, 17:29   Link #88
Quarkboy
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Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sylf
Let them go through several years of college level Japanese classes, get them trained, then milk them to death, dispose of them within 2 months since their debut, then replace them with more fresh translators. They're becoming dime a dozen anymore anyways. That sounds like a real plan. And an easy way for some of us to getting in to fansubbing - a real college education is all it takes! (You don't have to RTFM on your own, you don't have to teach yourself... what a bargain!)
There's some good truth in that, though.

Warning signs for BAD TRANSLATOR:

When asked: Have you taken any japanese courses in college? answers: Nope, I just learned on my own.
When asked: So then, you bought some books and studied on your own? Or maybe your parents or friends speak Japanese? Answers: Well, no, I mainly just watch a lot of anime raw. I can understand it all really good now, so don't worry about it.

Basically, to learn Japanese that way you'd have to be some kind of language savant. And that means they'd be REALLY hard to work with . I think there are a few people out there that learned like that though, but in general they SUCK. Imagine a Japanese person who learned all the english they ever knew from watching "Happy days". Yeeeeeahhh....
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Old 2006-05-30, 23:22   Link #89
Devastator
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Join Date: May 2006
Being a leader or even a project leader can be a very difficult job, but naturally someone needs to do play the part in order for the group to run. Some points that I feel are crucial about being a leader is being open-minded, time management, communication (as stated before), having some of the key skills required to fansub that many may not be as willing to fill (or have someone that you know you can trust that can fill in the holes) and keeping promises (or just don't make any).

1. First about being open-minded. It's probably been stated before. The leader needs to be able to accept that the first few attempts may not be a big success due to key factors. If a group stays consistant with the way they present their work despite numerous complaints from viewers, naturally their fanbase will only be as large as those who care only for what the group stands out for. It's a sad fact in my opinion to say that in many cases, speed wins even at the expense of quality (I, for one, am against this).

2. Time management. Starting young or starting later can have its ups and downs when it comes to managing time. If you start young, you may (Note: may) be able to adapt to being able to balance work and play. Of course, each person is different in their way of thinking and sometimes it has to do with discipline. Later in life, say college/university, it becomes important to know how to balance your time or it'll become a battle, especially around midterm/final exam periods.

3. I'll skip communication since it was covered quite extensively.

4. Now, having at least some fansubbing knowledge. Experimentation, I feel, is a good thing if you're not yet in a group or plan to join one and are already in a position.

When it comes to typesetting, experiment with the commands. I learned by reading the commands, understanding what each of them did individually, and combining them together to determine what kinds of things happen when you do certain things a certain way or order. I once heard that a fair deal of ASS karaoking was the result of either experimentation or the failed attempt to do something which led to something that was just as 'cool.'

Timing can often feel like a chore, and as said before, it is essential to have at least a basic understanding of the Japanese language when it comes to splitting lines. Of course, you can also get away with getting a timer who has absolutely no knowledge what-so-ever of Japanese and teach the translator to do the splitting for the timer to give the timer an easier time (no pun intended).

Editing can go from easy to very difficult depending on the person's background of the English language and the translator's ability to create an understandable sentence. I've seen a number of scripts which ranged from comprehensible sentences in which most of the errors were just tense or overuse of certain words to the inclusion of sentences that required a decoder to determine the meaning of. Naturally, translators that fell into the latter group were often removed from the project.

Encoding also has a lot of experimentation, I feel. Especially when a new codec or filter comes out that raises hype. I have personally only had a small taste of what an encoder's job entails, so I can't quite go into a lot of detail. However, sometimes it comes down to tweaking the settings for hours until you get what you want to see as a result.

Quality control (or checking) is an important role as it is the final line of defense against finding errors. I suppose there's not really much you can really 'experiment' with here, but hey, if you don't have the time to do anything else or need to relax, QC is a nice position.

5. Promises. Never try to promise anything unless you feel sure that you can pull through with it, sure enough to the possibility of knowing you will pull through. If you can't keep your promises, something's bound to happen that won't normally be in your favour. Losing staff members, having fights break out which can lead to sour relations and then losing staff, eventual loss of trust and then loss of staff, etc.

Obviously, you should consult your staff before making big decisions. Picking up any more than one project at a time while working on others without consideration of the workload it builds on members is a definite no. Doing so has a tendancy to draw older or even current projects to absolute zero and the fans will scream at you for it. Even the larger groups don't normally go beyond 3 or 4 series at any point in time unless they feel sure they can keep things moving.
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Old 2006-05-31, 05:43   Link #90
Access
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Join Date: Jan 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Devastator
5. Promises. Never try to promise anything unless you feel sure that you can pull through with it, sure enough to the possibility of knowing you will pull through. If you can't keep your promises, something's bound to happen that won't normally be in your favour. Losing staff members, having fights break out which can lead to sour relations and then losing staff, eventual loss of trust and then loss of staff, etc.

Obviously, you should consult your staff before making big decisions. Picking up any more than one project at a time while working on others without consideration of the workload it builds on members is a definite no. Doing so has a tendancy to draw older or even current projects to absolute zero and the fans will scream at you for it. Even the larger groups don't normally go beyond 3 or 4 series at any point in time unless they feel sure they can keep things moving.
I don't know why people are getting so tied up with 'leadership'; the leader doesn't even have the power to make decisions, at best he can 'speak for the group'. He can formalize a decision that's already been made (de-facto / unspoken) by the members. But if he tries to 'make' a decision, esp. an unpopular one, he won't get very far. A leader can't much affect the decision to start a project or continue it, that's up to the individuals who associate with that project. If a leader tries to refuse a project that motivated individuals want to do, those individuals find a way to participate in that project anyways.

I don't completely disagree with everything that has been said. But the importance of leadership is really just partly what has already been said, communication, someone with a fair repuation who can try to maintain group harmony and resolve any arguments that start between own group members, someone who can formalize decisions and handle any 'grunt work' that no one else wants to, or cares to do. To say that leadership includes things like 'making decisions' makes it sound like it's some kind of sought-after position and that people are living in the past. The problem that causes is these frequent people who try to start and lead their 'own group' with no idea of how a volunteer-type group functions and then these nonfunctional groups where everyone wants to lead and order others around but no one wants to actually do any work.

And not to say that good leadership is unimportant, esp. if the group is to be around a long time. Good, effective leadership may prevent stagnation, it can prevent group breakups or schisms, and the like. And bad leadership (or leadership that tries to force / make decisions) is almost gauranteed to cause problems. A-keep / Conclave would be the most prominent and publically-known example of how project decisions are really made, and more importantly where a schism and breakoff was caused by a 'leader' trying to 'make (alter) a decision' he couldn't effectively make, ie. that wasn't really his own to make (if anyone remembers that thread which described it in detail).
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Old 2006-05-31, 06:32   Link #91
LytHka
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@Access: I think you're talking about leadership in groups which don't exist any longer. The time of big, almost corporate -like groups is over. You don't see much of AnimeONE, AnimeJunkies, Anime-Keep, Elite-Fansubs -type of groups that'd do many projects at once. The quantity of active projects with steady releases the group has is really an indicator of how big a group is.
The trend right now is smaller groups with skilled personalities and a set schedule. Some groups can work that way and it's effective if everybody in the group sticks to it. It really requires a lot of self-discipline. Instead of having big groups, people work for multiple groups at once, perhaps run a few groups themselves, forming chains of groups that prevent oversubbing.
Otherwise, I agree with you that the group is its people, but the corporate fansubbing group exists no longer. Perhaps a collective of fansubbing groups...
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Old 2006-05-31, 07:57   Link #92
Devastator
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I have spent most of my fansubbing career working under another group. Although for the most part it was the staff (usually the translators) that would tell that 'figurehead' what series' they wanted to work on, some of the projects were picked up, I believe, because the 'figurehead' wanted to work on them.

At one time, there were already a number of projects, some of which had already gotten close enough to being lost in time (and such that even to announce that the group was going to pick up another series, there was quite a lot of staff saying "What, another series?"). Despite that, the 'group' suddenly picked up a number of new projects all at the same time.

Also, about promises. The 'figurehead' would often try to push the idea that things would still keep moving and certain things would get finished by a certain time. More often than not, while I was there, the 'figurehead' never actually pulled through until much, much later.
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Old 2006-05-31, 14:11   Link #93
Access
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LytHka
@Access: I think you're talking about leadership in groups which don't exist any longer. The time of big, almost corporate -like groups is over. You don't see much of AnimeONE, AnimeJunkies, Anime-Keep, Elite-Fansubs -type of groups that'd do many projects at once. The quantity of active projects with steady releases the group has is really an indicator of how big a group is.
The trend right now is smaller groups with skilled personalities and a set schedule. Some groups can work that way and it's effective if everybody in the group sticks to it. It really requires a lot of self-discipline. Instead of having big groups, people work for multiple groups at once, perhaps run a few groups themselves, forming chains of groups that prevent oversubbing.
Otherwise, I agree with you that the group is its people, but the corporate fansubbing group exists no longer. Perhaps a collective of fansubbing groups...
Yes, are we saying the same thing? By corporate you mean top-down leadership that 'makes' decisions and tries to force their will onto others? Like you say, this style of group has been tried, and failed, the remaining groups from that era (hnk, live-evil, animeco, etc.) were never that way to begin with. My concern was only that people were talking about group leadership more like it was the old type.
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Old 2006-06-03, 21:33   Link #94
getfresh
done
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Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Yokosuka, JP
Age: 33
lame...


you know why...


very lame indeed...
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Old 2006-06-03, 22:23   Link #95
physics223
In the Tatami Galaxy ↓
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Guys, I think this is the proper place to ask the question: where and how can I start studying about encoding?
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Old 2006-06-03, 22:54   Link #96
Eeknay
Gendo died for your sins.
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Join Date: Dec 2005
http://guide.zhentarim.net
http://doom9.org

#darkhold @ irc.chatsociety.net

Also parts of this;

http://www.animemusicvideos.org/guides/avtech/

guide are helpful, try not to take the filtering part too seriously. It's only an indication of what they do. There are many, many different filters for all kinds of things which of course you'll find through Doom9.

Also there are a few gems even on this forum, if you can manage to stomach the numerous threads encoders have posted in/taken over.
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Old 2006-06-03, 23:07   Link #97
physics223
In the Tatami Galaxy ↓
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
I checked doom9.org and read up on it, but I can't seem to pinpoint the most basic place to start. Can you help me?
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Old 2006-06-03, 23:28   Link #98
Eeknay
Gendo died for your sins.
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Start by following the Zhentarim guide and ripping/encoding some DVDs so you can get comfatable with the tools and the process. Then when you're ok with that, move onto raws and how to deal with problems in those.

Also in general play around with lossless/xvid/h264 encoding.

If you get stuck or don't understand something, ask in #darkhold. There's usually someone there with enough patience to help you.
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Old 2006-06-04, 01:13   Link #99
physics223
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Thanks, eeknay. I'm starting to read up on codecs and such right now.
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Old 2006-06-04, 05:15   Link #100
physics223
In the Tatami Galaxy ↓
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
I tried beginning scripting with AviSynth after reading about two hours into codecs and whatnot.

A n00b's question, but how can you deal with this? AviSource("D:\[x-raws]_Ergo_Proxy_-_11_[704x396_DivX6.22][9EDDA648].avi")

It won't run no matter how many times I've tried, even with the fourCC="divx" string extension. A knowledgeable person in darkhold told me to procure the encoder w/ the CCCP FAQ, but glancing back the second time I still don't know what to do with it. I know that it's DivX6 - with the RAW description but I don't know how else to proceed, because the I've followed the instructions for my first script well, I think.

I'm pretty sure it wasn't encoded in MPEG2 - otherwise the big filesize, so I didn't use DirectShowSource. I really welcome your help, seeing that googling for DivX6 encoders left me with a lot of crap sites. :/

(Oh, and I just realized that BS Player is unwelcome with a lot of CCCP staff. lol, I uninstalled it. I hope you guys could help: I'm pooped reading eight hours straight, and frustrated I barely learnt anything. *_* )

Thanks.
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