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Old 2006-09-29, 16:33   Link #21
Epyon9283
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bayoab
As jinto said, this is incorrect. Linux and Macs can easily be hit by any of the above but compared to the number of windows boxes out there, hackers rarely bother. There are linux and mac viruses out there, especially root kits.
Linux and OS X have fantastic real world security records compared to Windows. If it was so easy to infect Linux and OS X, why aren't there more viruses out there? I have difficultly believing its because there are relatively few boxes out there. Linux is pretty popular in the server space. If someone were to write a virus that spread quickly in Linux or OS X they'd gain some notoriety.

Also virus != rootkit
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Old 2006-09-29, 16:53   Link #22
Jinto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Epyon9283
Linux and OS X have fantastic real world security records compared to Windows. If it was so easy to infect Linux and OS X, why aren't there more viruses out there? I have difficultly believing its because there are relatively few boxes out there. Linux is pretty popular in the server space. If someone were to write a virus that spread quickly in Linux or OS X they'd gain some notoriety.

Also virus != rootkit
"cum hoc ergo propter hoc" possible. It could partly be the OS, it could partly be the userbase (experienced vs. inexperienced), it could partly be the scale of world wide distribution, it could partly be the concepts (i.e. open source vs. sealed source)... and one should not forget, there exist so many different builds of Linux, that the world wide distribution of one special build/configuration to attack is realy marginal.
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Old 2006-09-29, 20:14   Link #23
bayoab
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Epyon9283
Linux and OS X have fantastic real world security records compared to Windows.
The Morris worm. The ramen worm. The li0n worm. The slapper worm. I can keep going. There have been a couple of minor ones recently but as Jinto basically said, the world of linux has diversified to the point that its hard to write 1 single worm. There was actually an attempt in 2005 at the latest version of a worm for a sendmail vuln iirc. "Wait, but most of these don't actually affect the nix core itself." Yes, they attack the installed components that you find on almost every server. The actual base os itself has a better security track in the last 6 years than MS. (Most pre-blaster worms for MS affected IIS and only IIS). A windows box with an admin who knows what they are doing (Even running as admin) is just as secure as a OSX or Linux box.

In the past 6 years, there have been about 8 or so remotely wormable holes in Windows. Otherwise, the majority of the exploits that have done anything are in IE or Office Suite/Outlook.

Quote:
If it was so easy to infect Linux and OS X, why aren't there more viruses out there? I have difficultly believing its because there are relatively few boxes out there. Linux is pretty popular in the server space. If someone were to write a virus that spread quickly in Linux or OS X they'd gain some notoriety.
OSX viruses are very very difficult to write from my understanding of the OS security model. My understanding is that they are trivial to do, but all require user interaction basically. There are plently of unpatched components on any OS X that a good enough 0 day will result in a decent attack. But there are so few OS X boxes out there that this is probably not even worth your time.

Linux is a different story. Most linux boxes have a set of programs which will be there semireliably and so it is very easy once you find something listening that is exploitable. There is no user interaction required if you find the right targets. (1x remote code on a program with enough privs + 1x priv eliv = all your root are belong to us). You can't exactly write a virus for linux that does anything reliably except take control or log the affected system. What are you going to do, have popup ads in the terminal?

Quote:
Also virus != rootkit
If you are qualifying a virus by whether it self-replicates, then yes. If you are qualifying virus as the umbrella term for malware which it has become, then no.
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Old 2006-09-30, 01:37   Link #24
NoSanninWa
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This discussion has gone well beyond the topic at hand. If you really want to have a detailed discussion of computer security as relating to Linux, please make your own thread for it.
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Old 2006-09-30, 06:18   Link #25
felix
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@ Sylf

I don't recognize 2 of the programs that you mentioned, meaning it will take me some time as I have to look into them. (Gimp was already on my list BTW)
Anyway I want to check/add all the audio programs mentioned earlier first.

The only reason I concentrated on security apps up until now was because, NSW request never got a good enough answer...

@ Jinto Lin

First of all when I made the list (for the security thing), I first started by simply searching for all security topics here. Then I would just start reading and taking little notes (what I was taking notes of were names and good/bad points). After I read 2-3 of the small threads (I think) the idea of counting them came up. (for the sake of ordering them... in the end I just ordered them as I looked them up, more or less, as in random order).

Half way the idea of using all the counting as rating came up, my intention with the list is to make it easy to decide what to choose, actually to present what they can choose, not to sell it to people, the idea of counting things like awards, reviews and such did come to mind, but I somehow feel it's wrong, I can't put my finger on it, but there's something about using that kind of information that doesn't seem right.

My original idea with the "rating by reply" was that, since the threads (were I searched) weren't designed to vote the best there would be no cheating (for example if there was a pole some people might vote for item X either because nobody voted for it or everybody voted for it or they just like the name or some other stupid reason), I figure the rating would be honest. My only intention with it was for it to be a little extra (tie breaker).

Hmm... I guess I was a little naive to think people would focus on it too much
Thanks for the quick reply Jinto Lin... I'll remove them... maybe leaving it without any rating is better...

Hmm... can you expand a little on the "find some reliable sources online, experts who have tested different tools (like FWs and AVs) and base your rating on such sources?" idea... I can't really enter "good and reliable source" and expect to come up with what you mention... (also most rating sites for security software also conveniently have them on display with all the praise of the company that made it... I have to wonder if censorship doesn't occur... also this "author's choice" is all fishy IMO).

I did search for review sites... none seem to be any good IMO...
Most review sites I saw don't seem to touch the free ones too much (if at all). All they seem to do is bash them into the ground as useless then mention something like 2 of them (AVG, Avast from what I've seen) no comparison test results no nothing, all I've read is personal opinion nothing technical.
But that's not the only reason. What review sites out there seem to do is just write what product x has to offer in as many lines as possible. (usually they just review the most expensive and complete (antivirus, firewall, anti-spam etc) version of the product).

Well, what I'm looking for in a review site is some technical babble behind the personal opinions... and reviews not just for the ones they really like (at least some indication that they are aware of some of the other alternatives and have tested them at some point in time) I'm really having a hard time finding such a site. You wouldn't happen to know some now would you ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto Lin
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
1. The Home Edition is always junk compared to the Corporate Edition.
No, you cannot generalize on this. The question should be, do you need the software beyond its home edition use?
It's not my personal opinion...
All I personally know about them is that they're something different when it comes to how the license and product activation work.
I saw a few, but they weren't really stuff that I used so I couldn't tell if they had anything (visibly) special.

I've seen some posts (and heard of it a few times in the past) were people would say something like they use antivirus x home edition at home but at they're univirsity/job/wathever they use the corporate and it's better. (I presume better (or whatever word or phrase with equal meaning they use) = "more friendly")

Anyway these aren't my opinion, I'm very skeptical, if I believed 100% in them then I would have posted them in the list and not here.
Figure I check to see if there's any truth/good in them

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
Linux and Macs are 100% virus/spyware/mallware FREE.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto Lin
Almost. That basically means there are only some incidents known of infections on Linux. That does not neccessarily mean such OSes are much safer, but maybe just less a target, because in comparison to Windows relatively uncommon.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bayoab
As jinto said, this is incorrect. Linux and Macs can easily be hit by any of the above but compared to the number of windows boxes out there, hackers rarely bother. There are linux and mac viruses out there, especially root kits.
Hmm... so the correct version would be...
Quote:
Linux and Mac are as vulnerable as windows but chances of encountering a threat for them are substantially lower
Hmm... *looks at some of the other Mac/Linux post*
@_@ I guess this is one myth/flam-bait that can't easily be grinded...
Oh well... NSW ended any debates on the subject no point in continuing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto Lin
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
IE invites trouble.
If you...
know which settings to use,
keep it updated,
know which part of the registry to set readonly,
... than it is basically as safe as other browsers.
It has a considerably low preload compared to other browsers. It is easier to safely use browsers like Firefox instead.
By setting I suspect you are refering to the settings for privacy (cookies etc)

As for the registry settings to ReadOnly... -_^
Lets see, I go to registry editor then go to Current User/Software/Microsoft/Internet Explorer and...... what? I set the permissions so they're readonly to... what?...... also, that helps improve security because....... ?
Sorry I just don't see your point with the registry settings .
Is it really worth the trouble...? but I guess I'm just missing something
What settings do you suggest setting to ReadOnly ?

Anyway... back to your original argument...
Isn't the issue the same as with Linux/Macs... as in IE is the most used thus it's more likely to be targeted. . I read more (convincing) stuff on Firefox being less secure then IE then vise versa, but I still think Firefox is safer for the reason mentioned earlier

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
4. Firewall only stops hackers and trojans NOT viruses.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto Lin
No a firewall doesn't stop hackers and trojans, but chances are high, that they cannot affect the PC much. It should stop any suspicious comunication, and any comunication you did block, or did not have yet allowed (if it is a fairly good firewall). Some special FWs have intrusion detection, but I wouldn't rely on such automated features too much.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bayoab
No. This is a really difficult issue because things like norton are firewalls + a shitload of other protections. A normal firewall, will stop internet worms and hackers if properly configured and there is nothing vulnerable on the other side. A firewall will not protect you from a webpage with malicious code or clicking on a bad program.
Uhh... ok
Let's see, so to make an analogy a firewall simple keeps doors shut and gives keys to programs. So if say Opera has the key to open the door for web pages, then if I'm not careful little monsters can come in.

So what is the safest way to use a firewall? Should I just block everything and set access on a need to use basis only, as in I install Opera I give it access to the ports it needs for what I need it for.

On another note, what do you guys think of adding firewall scans as a security advise. As in free online firewall scans/tests like these from ShieldsUP Sygate PlanetSecurity
I personally don't have any experience with them, are they any good ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
6. Broadband pluged directly into the computer = DEATH.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto Lin
Yes this is because of the high voltages. Always handle a broadband cable with care, you might get severly hurt if you come into contact with any conductive part. This thing is as dangerous as three phase high current. Try to share your braodband connection with as many as possible users, so it won't hurt your computer too much (I hope sarcasm is obvious).

Gomen gomen... little mistake when I wrote it from my confusing little notes...
It should be...
Quote:
6. Broadband pluged directly into the computer is bad. Always use rooters.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto Lin
No, routers are routers. And not every router is the same. Most of them will partly work as FW because they usually have closed incoming ports by default (means they just forward on certain ports like port 80 (http))
Quote:
Originally Posted by bayoab
Routers are not firewalls. Many routers have built in firewalls. The way a router protects you is that by default, it drops incoming packets for new connections if they are started from the outside world. This is not how a firewall works.
Well if I'm not mistaken you can make "software" routers thus there is no real security advantage to using routers. Correct...?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto Lin
Maybe I sound too harsh
Generally I don't feel something is quite right until it passes a few hurdles...
If you ever don't like something here always say it out load don't you dare go soft on me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto Lin
And you need to pay attention to not use (or even consider) phrases like
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
6. Broadband pluged directly into the computer = DEATH.
Thats not very scientifically phrased. It won't add to the overall reputation of your software ratings. You know, some people might reason from the quality of such a statement on the quality of your software rating.
It's not my personal opinion and if I didn't say it now someone would have broth it up later and the others like linux/mac security, I figure it's better to discuss it under a friendly manner now then to wait for someone to use it as flam-bait later.
That and I wanted some harsh criticism on other parts of the list, figure people would offer more criticism (in general) if I posted things like that.
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Old 2006-09-30, 07:17   Link #26
bayoab
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
Uhh... ok
Let's see, so to make an analogy a firewall simple keeps doors shut and gives keys to programs. So if say Opera has the key to open the door for web pages, then if I'm not careful little monsters can come in.
It's more complicated than that. I'll try this "simplified" explanation. Imagine a huge wall between your computer and the internet filled with doors and a guard house on both sides. Each door corresponds to a different method of connecting. You set firewall rules which tell either: which methods don't have to stop at the guard house , which methods have to stop in one direction, which methods should always be turned back, or etc. Programs which you let connect to the internet are given a pass to go past the guard house and use their door. Programs that you don't assign rules for basically have to stop at the guard house infront of the wall and be checked first. The same applies for inbound traffic.
Quote:
So what is the safest way to use a firewall? Should I just block everything and set access on a need to use basis only, as in I install Opera I give it access to the ports it needs for what I need it for.
Once you have been running the firewall for a while and you have set all your program permissions, a last rule should be set: "For * Deny ALL" Rules are supposed to be processed in order.
Optimally, if the program is trusted, you can pretty much let them do what they want going outbound. If you want to limit where that program goes on the internet, then you will want to narrow the rules. (Ex: I let mozilla go wherever it wants but I don't let the rss reader go anywhere except port 80. This is to limit the damage if a feed gets hijacked somehow since RSS is automated.)
Quote:
On another note, what do you guys think of adding firewall scans as a security advise. As in free online firewall scans/tests like these from ShieldsUP Sygate PlanetSecurity
I personally don't have any experience with them, are they any good ?
Norton's online security scanner is decent. Sheilds up is semi BS in how "secure" things are. It claims "OMG, your vulnerable" when you really aren't. I've never used the other two.


Quote:
Well if I'm not mistaken you can make "software" routers thus there is no real security advantage to using routers. Correct...?
You can, but they are very inefficient and pretty much a waste of time.
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Old 2006-09-30, 08:32   Link #27
Jinto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
...
Hmm... can you expand a little on the "find some reliable sources online, experts who have tested different tools (like FWs and AVs) and base your rating on such sources?" idea... I can't really enter "good and reliable source" and expect to come up with what you mention... (also most rating sites for security software also conveniently have them on display with all the praise of the company that made it... I have to wonder if censorship doesn't occur... also this "author's choice" is all fishy IMO).

I did search for review sites... none seem to be any good IMO...
Most review sites I saw don't seem to touch the free ones too much (if at all). All they seem to do is bash them into the ground as useless then mention something like 2 of them (AVG, Avast from what I've seen) no comparison test results no nothing, all I've read is personal opinion nothing technical.
But that's not the only reason. What review sites out there seem to do is just write what product x has to offer in as many lines as possible. (usually they just review the most expensive and complete (antivirus, firewall, anti-spam etc) version of the product).

Well, what I'm looking for in a review site is some technical babble behind the personal opinions... and reviews not just for the ones they really like (at least some indication that they are aware of some of the other alternatives and have tested them at some point in time) I'm really having a hard time finding such a site. You wouldn't happen to know some now would you ?
...
That is indeed not easy to find. I could tell you about a german site I'ld use, but that won't help you I guess. AV-test.de is a project of a german university. I trust such a source, because I think a governmentally financed university is independent enough to test unbiased. But they were involved with several english publications like this one.

Unfortunately I cannot give you the ultimate site for looking up reliable information about everything. Sometimes you need to ask, what would be the benefit for the author to favour a certain product. How professional may the test cases be? And maybe some other questions, like is this report still up to date.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
...
It's not my personal opinion...
All I personally know about them is that they're something different when it comes to how the license and product activation work.
I saw a few, but they weren't really stuff that I used so I couldn't tell if they had anything (visibly) special.

I've seen some posts (and heard of it a few times in the past) were people would say something like they use antivirus x home edition at home but at they're univirsity/job/wathever they use the corporate and it's better. (I presume better (or whatever word or phrase with equal meaning they use) = "more friendly")


Anyway these aren't my opinion, I'm very skeptical, if I believed 100% in them then I would have posted them in the list and not here.
Figure I check to see if there's any truth/good in them
...
The dangers are much higher for corporate type use. The larger a system, the harder to keep it clean, stable and running. Sure if you want the best protection, go with the professional tools. But most home users will be okay with the home editions. Some of them are quite good.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
...
Hmm... so the correct version would be...

Hmm... *looks at some of the other Mac/Linux post*
@_@ I guess this is one myth/flam-bait that can't easily be grinded...
Oh well... NSW ended any debates on the subject no point in continuing...
...
That is not directly what I wanted to imply. In my lectures of systems engineering and software failure tolerance I learned some nice techniques to use security/robustness/monitoring wrappers, software hardening tools (ballista, HEALERS, CINT, AspectC++ ...) and so on to make Linux more stable and secure.
We were also provided detailed information on how many leaks, bugs... could by avoided by these techniques. So my conclusion was, with the explosion of amount of code in Linux, the amount of bugs and security leaks became an important issue. Many of the techniques we learned helped to minimize those issues. But that shows, that systems like Linux are not safe per se. It depends on your build, the security meassures taken and so on... The digital world isn't as easy as 1 and 0


Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
By setting I suspect you are refering to the settings for privacy (cookies etc)

As for the registry settings to ReadOnly... -_^
Lets see, I go to registry editor then go to Current User/Software/Microsoft/Internet Explorer and...... what? I set the permissions so they're readonly to... what?...... also, that helps improve security because....... ?
Sorry I just don't see your point with the registry settings .
Is it really worth the trouble...? but I guess I'm just missing something
What settings do you suggest setting to ReadOnly ?
Hm, not quite my intention. I am not sure if you want to set all your ie-settings to read only, it depends on what you want to do with your browser. Also consider things like autostart (run, global startup), registered services. The more you set read only, the less might happen (and the less software you will be able to install without the need to reenable rights to write to certain parts of the registry). One needs to find a good personal trade off there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
Anyway... back to your original argument...
Isn't the issue the same as with Linux/Macs... as in IE is the most used thus it's more likely to be targeted. . I read more (convincing) stuff on Firefox being less secure then IE then vise versa, but I still think Firefox is safer for the reason mentioned earlier
Partly yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
Uhh... ok
Let's see, so to make an analogy a firewall simple keeps doors shut and gives keys to programs. So if say Opera has the key to open the door for web pages, then if I'm not careful little monsters can come in.
Yes, thats basically the function of a firewall. Good firewalls work with software fingerprints. So if you or a trojan or virus tries to alter i.e. the Opera.exe the registered fingerprint won't work anymore, and the new Opera.exe will be blocked until the user confirms, that it is allowed to use port x for incoming/outgoing/both/certain protocol connection. But basically a FW is as secure as the programs that have granded access to the internet by the firewall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
So what is the safest way to use a firewall? Should I just block everything and set access on a need to use basis only, as in I install Opera I give it access to the ports it needs for what I need it for.
First consider the safety of your program, then check which resources (ports/protocol...) it will use, then asign only these and block everything else.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
On another note, what do you guys think of adding firewall scans as a security advise. As in free online firewall scans/tests like these from ShieldsUP Sygate PlanetSecurity
I personally don't have any experience with them, are they any good ?
honestly I don't know either. I am not a security fanatic. I don't see a reason why a skilled hacker should attack my PC. Thatswhy I am fine with my router (that works as a very simple/not so effective firewall).

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII

Gomen gomen... little mistake when I wrote it from my confusing little notes...
It should be...


Well if I'm not mistaken you can make "software" routers thus there is no real security advantage to using routers. Correct...?
If it is only for the security reason, use a FW. If you need the routing (because you want to grant several mashines access to the internet over just one (or few) line(s), you'ld take a router. I do not see any reason to use a router, just for security reasons. A good FW is more secure than most routers anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
Generally I don't feel something is quite right until it passes a few hurdles...
If you ever don't like something here always say it out load don't you dare go soft on me.
Sometimes I am really too harsh. Often I have to read again what I wrote, just to realize it.
I know your intention is to provide something usefull to the audience, and I should keep level headed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackCatXIII
It's not my personal opinion and if I didn't say it now someone would have broth it up later and the others like linux/mac security, I figure it's better to discuss it under a friendly manner now then to wait for someone to use it as flam-bait later.
That and I wanted some harsh criticism on other parts of the list, figure people would offer more criticism (in general) if I posted things like that.
Yes, I know ^^'. I should have used more "one" instead of "you" in my critics.
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Old 2006-10-01, 12:32   Link #28
Sylf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto Lin
Good firewalls work with software fingerprints. So if you or a trojan or virus tries to alter i.e. the Opera.exe the registered fingerprint won't work anymore, and the new Opera.exe will be blocked until the user confirms, that it is allowed to use port x for incoming/outgoing/both/certain protocol connection. But basically a FW is as secure as the programs that have granded access to the internet by the firewall.
Even with this function, the user should be told to be careful. This is a good technology, but some software updates more often than others, and start making the user click on "allow" button faster than they can really think. Reflex is a scary thing. The general opensource way of thinking is "release early and often," and that's actually working against making the systems secure in this instance.
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Old 2006-10-11, 04:29   Link #29
felix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto Lin View Post
That is indeed not easy to find. I could tell you about a german site I'ld use, but that won't help you I guess. AV-test.de is a project of a german university. I trust such a source, because I think a governmentally financed university is independent enough to test unbiased. But they were involved with several english publications like this one.

Unfortunately I cannot give you the ultimate site for looking up reliable information about everything. Sometimes you need to ask, what would be the benefit for the author to favour a certain product. How professional may the test cases be? And maybe some other questions, like is this report still up to date.
I'll give up on this... it's too damn hard to find...
The best I could find is http://www.av-comparatives.org/
I'll just add it and be done with the security things for now...
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Old 2006-10-11, 05:53   Link #30
Poseidal
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The section in G. seems rather short, and only seems to have one (very) expensive option.

I will just put in that there's Corel Paint Shop Pro X (now they've bought it from/bought Jasc), which is quite powerful and doesn't cost half of the price of Photoshop (currently at £41 [~ $80] or so from Corel's UK website). I don't know the exact bells and whistles it has and hasn't got compared to Photoshop, but it has all the things there for at least basic painting and photo-editing use, though I hear the interface is quite different to PS. I used to use Jasc Paint Shop Pro 7, which I hear you can get very cheap now which is fast and does the job, but it's alpha use among other things aren't as powerful as the newer version.

Other people use Open Canvas, which seems reasonably popular; Corel Painter is also available (not sure on the prices of both). I think these are much more painting based and don't offer that much in terms of photo editing, but I haven't got these.


These are just some other options if people don't feel like parting with $650 or piracy.


There's also Vector images. The two I can think of are Xara Xtreme and Corel Draw; the *nix version of the former is Open Source; the Windows version is not. I use the older version of Xara: Xara X, which I haven't had the need to upgrade from.
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Old 2006-10-11, 09:00   Link #31
felix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poseidal View Post
The section in G. seems rather short, and only seems to have one (very) expensive option.
Because I had a few (ok... a lot) of personal things to deal with.
Thanks for the suggestions, I'll look into them.
I like to check and recheck things in detail, it's a slow process, but things will get added eventually... as long as life doesn't interfere too much.
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Old 2006-10-13, 10:32   Link #32
Hemisphere
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Join Date: May 2006
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Any good program for cutting down MP3s?

As the title suggests, I'm looking for a program which can cut down one long clip of an MP3 into various short clips. I'm not really knowledgeable when it comes to these things, so I hope someone can tell me a good program for this purpose as well as what steps to take, depending on the program.

Much appreciated in advance!
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Last edited by NoSanninWa; 2006-10-13 at 14:33. Reason: Threads merged. Because... that's what this thread is for!
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Old 2006-10-13, 11:56   Link #33
Sylf
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Audacity.

Open the mp3 file, highlight the section you want, edit->copy, file->new, edit->paste, file->save as, and save the clip as mp3 or any format of your choice.

It shouldn't be too hard.
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Old 2006-10-13, 12:10   Link #34
ImperialPanda
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: US
Yes audacity. Remember to get the LAME MP3 encoder, lame_enc.dll

http://www-users.york.ac.uk/~raa110/audacity/lame.html
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Old 2006-10-13, 14:17   Link #35
Jekyll
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Germany
Age: 30
There's one problem with using Audacity to cut your MP3s. They are decoded and then reencoded, which means that you lose quality. I suggest the following program:

http://www.mpgedit.org/mpgedit/home.html

Get the windows installer for xmpgedit in the download section. To cut your MP3, do the following (I only used it on Linux, but it should be the same on Windows):
  1. In the menu bar, use "File", then "Open File..." to open your MP3.
  2. Make sure your MP3 file is selected in the list, then in the File menu, select "Decode". This makes it display a fancy wave form of your MP3.
  3. Select a section in the wave form. Alternatively, you can set the start time for your cut in the three input fields, hit the green button, then set the end time and hit the red one.
  4. Hit the rightmost button directly under the wave form (looks like a down arrow) to save the section. A new entry in the list at the top will appear.
  5. Select and save more sections until you are satisfied.
  6. Use "File" and "Output file..." to select a base filename. Example: Choosing output.mp3 with three sections will result in the cut sections being named "output_1.mp3", "output_2.mp3" and "output_3.mp3".
  7. Use "File", then "Edit" to make the program create your cut out MP3s.

This should allow you to cut your MP3 files without any loss of quality.
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Old 2006-10-30, 16:12   Link #36
Dan_87
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Join Date: Aug 2006
hello

im looking for a good video editing software

i want to like cut out pieces from the anime/video im watching and like make samples and mini clips

does anyone know a good and yet simple software to do this ?

thanks in davance

-dan
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Old 2006-11-01, 00:39   Link #37
raikage
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Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: San Francisco
Age: 31
I would recommend Avid FreeDV -- just because it's free, and Avid is pretty much the industry standard for editing.

http://www.avid.com/freedv/
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Old 2006-11-12, 23:51   Link #38
Wandering_Youth
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Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: edge of my dream in the land of twilight...ZzzZzZ
I like to suggest a couple of PC Windows performance improving software that I am using.

PageDefrag - A free software that defrags your pagefile allowing windows to bootup and shutdown faster.

Registry Mechanic - A paid software that cleans and removes corrupt or empty file paths no longer used in the Windows Registry. It's helps with bootup and shutdown time but also helps reduce program crashes. It's good if your a person who installs and uninstalls programs often.
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Old 2006-11-15, 08:20   Link #39
felix
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: event horizon
Huh?!~ @_@
This thread is still here.. I thought it got deleted by some mean mod.. instead it's a stiky.. yay ^^

*looks around*
OMG.. got to get busy busy.. xD
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Old 2006-11-26, 21:21   Link #40
felix
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: event horizon
Quote - Wandering_Youth
--------------------------------------
I like to suggest a couple of PC Windows performance improving software that I am using.

PageDefrag - A free software that defrags your pagefile allowing windows to bootup and shutdown faster.

Registry Mechanic - A paid software that cleans and removes corrupt or empty file paths no longer used in the Windows Registry. It's helps with bootup and shutdown time but also helps reduce program crashes. It's good if your a person who installs and uninstalls programs often.
--------------------------------------
All done ^^
*reps..*
Quote - Poseidal
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The section in G. seems rather short, and only seems to have one (very) expensive option.

I will just put in that there's Corel Paint Shop Pro X (now they've bought it from/bought Jasc), which is quite powerful and doesn't cost half of the price of Photoshop (currently at £41 [~ $80] or so from Corel's UK website). I don't know the exact bells and whistles it has and hasn't got compared to Photoshop, but it has all the things there for at least basic painting and photo-editing use, though I hear the interface is quite different to PS. I used to use Jasc Paint Shop Pro 7, which I hear you can get very cheap now which is fast and does the job, but it's alpha use among other things aren't as powerful as the newer version.

Other people use Open Canvas, which seems reasonably popular; Corel Painter is also available (not sure on the prices of both). I think these are much more painting based and don't offer that much in terms of photo editing, but I haven't got these.


These are just some other options if people don't feel like parting with $650 or piracy.


There's also Vector images. The two I can think of are Xara Xtreme and Corel Draw; the *nix version of the former is Open Source; the Windows version is not. I use the older version of Xara: Xara X, which I haven't had the need to upgrade from.
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Quote - Sylf
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Graphics.
Not everyone needs the power of photoshop. Heck, extremely limited number of people can really utilize the power of photoshop anyway. Seriously, it's a professional tool, not a casual home entertainment tool. I've never used this personally, but I think Photoshop Elements should be mentioned as well. Priced just below $90, it's much more affordable, and should pose less learning curve.
--------------------------------------
How about I split the section in two or three..
Something like..
Special Effects Tools - Photoshop, Gimp

Painting/Drawing Tools - Open Canvas (pay), Pain.Net (free)
Vector Tools - Illustrator (pay), Inkscape (free)
..of course with proper description/details..

Well that's what I'm thinking ATM
Any objections?? :) (after a day, if nobody has any, I'll presume there aren't and move foword..)

Ohh.. I still need to do some reaserch on Corel Paint Shop Pro, which is at XI now (not 10) if I'm not mistaken.. corel draw/painter.. but judging from experience I think those programs are super clutered.. or at least that's how remember them in previeus versions..
BTW does anyone have some kind experience with any of them? :(

*goes to sleep*
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