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Old 2007-04-11, 14:55   Link #1
Bakaneko23
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Join Date: Nov 2006
Re-ecoding .h264 over xvid?

Most often anime is encoded in xvid. Since i try to get my anime to a dvd to play on tv i usually find myself adding borders to fit the subtitles . My question is if i were to re-encode this xvid video over again except with .h264 would the quality of video and audio improve on a dvd player or is it just a waste of time? Should i just encode it again with xvid to add the borders or is it possible to improve the quality

i dunno is that too confusing to understand Oo?
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Old 2007-04-11, 18:50   Link #2
Farix
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Join Date: Jan 2005
I don't know of any DVD player that currently plays h264/AVC video.
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Old 2007-04-11, 19:09   Link #3
Ledgem
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Waste of time. Consider it with audio formats, something people are more familiar with: an MP3 is a lossy format, meaning that it gets rid of some data in its compression process. Suppose I have an MP3 that is at 96 kbps. If I re-encode it to 320 kbps, does it sound any better? The answer is no, it does not. The reason is because the original source was 96 kbps, and for that reason, no matter what format or bitrate I re-encode that MP3 to, I can never get quality better than 96 kbps.

The same is true for XviD and H.264. Both of these are different compression formats, but they are both lossy. H.264 is superior to XviD, it's true, but if you're using an XviD-encoded video as your source to start with, you'll never be able to get that video to look better, simply by re-encoding it to a superior format. If you have a DVD-source and you want to encode it from there, then you would have a better quality using H.264.

In truth, re-encoding something between lossy formats will always result in worse quality than you started with. People used to ask about re-encoding MP3s, and the analogy/experiment that they were told to do was to try saving a JPEG over and over again. You would see deterioriation in the image quality (gradually if you set it to high quality, and much quicker with lower quality settings). The experiment for you would be to try the same thing, only fluctuate it between GIF and JPEG. Both are different image compression formats, but both are lossy, and both will cut out some data each time they remake the file.

For your reference, lossy's counterpart is lossless. The best-known lossless image format is PNG; the best-known lossless sound formats are APE and FLAC. I believe there was an experimental lossless video codec, but I've never seen it used outside of a fansub group I worked with. Lossless codecs work much like a ZIP or RAR file: they compress the data, but when you get the data back, it's the exact same as before it was compressed. In contrast, lossy codecs compress the data, and in the process, they modify it (by removing certain bits); if you were to uncompress it, you would have something different than before you'd compressed it.
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Old 2007-04-12, 06:24   Link #4
Farix
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Quote:
The experiment for you would be to try the same thing, only fluctuate it between GIF and JPEG. Both are different image compression formats, but both are lossy, and both will cut out some data each time they remake the file.
I have to correct something here with GIF as it is not a lossy format, but a lossless. However, it has a limited color pallet of 256 colors which gives it the appearance of a lossy format if saving high color images. PNG was created to replace GIF because of patent and licensing issues with GIF's compression arthrograms.
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Old 2007-04-12, 10:44   Link #5
Bakaneko23
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thanks alot ledgem thats exactly what i wanted to know. Now i wont have to stare at my xvid video smirking if i see something bad quality wise saying
"dam i should have done h264" I guess all the times i did that it was a waste of time cause .h264 takes FOREVER!!!!

Thanks again <3
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Old 2007-04-14, 17:15   Link #6
RiN!
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Join Date: Oct 2006
Hey i wanna add a question onto this.Lets say i have 10 videos that all have a bitrate of 900kbps. If i were to make a dvd out of these videos would it be smart to fill up the dvd with as many videos as possible as to have the average bitrate be 900kbps? Because using convertxtodvd when it encodes your stuff to dvd it says at the bottom "average bitrate" and its usually( with about 6 episodes) in the 3000's. According to above if my video is already at 970 the 3000 bitrate wont do anything? or does it work differently with dvd? Because instead of using 6 videos i might beable to fit all 10 with the same quality.
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Old 2007-04-14, 18:21   Link #7
TheFluff
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Lossless video codecs are not very experimental, they're used all the time. They just aren't used for distribution, because one ep takes 3-5 GB with a lossless codec...

@RiN!: DVD uses another codec, called MPEG2, which requires much higher bitrates to look good. It won't look BETTER than the XviD did, but if you use only 900kbps for the DVD, it will look a LOT worse. You probably shouldn't ever go lower than 1500kpbs on a DVD, or it will look pretty crappy.
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17:43:13 <~deculture> Also, TheFluff, you are so fucking slowpoke.jpg that people think we dropped the DVD's.
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01:04:41 < Plorkyeran> it was annoying to typeset so it should be annoying to read
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Old 2007-04-14, 19:32   Link #8
RiN!
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yeh i just did a test and it came out pretty crappy. For 6 episodes 3000kb/s is pretty good right? I'm kinda confused how you start to tell that the dvd is losing quality. Is it when the screen on your tv looks as if its shaking or if the pixels start showing up or maybe both?
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