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Old 2007-05-08, 21:42   Link #301
WanderingKnight
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Quote:
Best example I can think of is 了解 ("understood/roger"). It is read as riu kai in Japanese on-yomi pronunciation, vs liu gai in Cantonese.
It's りょうかい (ryoukai, with a long o and no u). But anyways, it's pretty similar. I refer, once again, to the Wikipedia article, with sums up pretty handsomely the origin of the on-yomi reading.
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Old 2007-05-10, 13:28   Link #302
Spectacular_Insanity
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingKnight View Post
And there are 5000 accepted kanji in Japanese--1945 are the most commonly used.
Hmm, while rereading some of this thread, I just did a double take on this part. Does anyone else but me find the number 1945 ironic?
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Old 2007-05-11, 02:38   Link #303
TinyRedLeaf
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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Lol. All-in-all, my personal opinion is that Japanese is a murderously difficult language to master, notwithstanding all the simplifications that have been implemented through the years. Learning its basics is no harder than learning any other foreign language though.

In comparison, Chinese seems difficult to learn because of the sheer number of hanzi you have to memorise (I recall reading somewhere that you need to know at least 3,000 characters to be considered fluent), but Chinese grammar is actually very easy to master. For one thing, you don't have to worry about tense conjugations and what not, haha.
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Old 2007-05-20, 10:14   Link #304
ShikaShika
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
Lol. All-in-all, my personal opinion is that Japanese is a murderously difficult language to master, notwithstanding all the simplifications that have been implemented through the years. Learning its basics is no harder than learning any other foreign language though.

In comparison, Chinese seems difficult to learn because of the sheer number of hanzi you have to memorise (I recall reading somewhere that you need to know at least 3,000 characters to be considered fluent), but Chinese grammar is actually very easy to master. For one thing, you don't have to worry about tense conjugations and what not, haha.
We're moving off topic, but I'll give it a go. Having studied both Japanese and Chinese I have to say, that as a northern European I found it extremely dificult to master the Chinese pronounciation, as little differences (that don't even exist in most western languages) could change the meaning entirely of what you're saying. The Japanese language in comparison is much easier, as the pronounciation basically mirrors that of Swedish as far as vocal sounds are concerned. Basically the only sounds that are different are the Japanese r and the Japanese f/h. But even then if I use the Swedish pronounciation, everyone will know what I mean at least. Just another perspective.

As for on topic, I'm considering a trip to Hokkaido this summer (August most likely), and was wondering if anyone had any tips? I will probably be centered in Sapporo, and due to time restrictions I probably won't be able to go to the eastern part of Hokkaido.
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Old 2007-06-08, 16:52   Link #305
Shiokaze
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Soo yeah, I'm going to Japan in mid July. I will be going to Tokyo for a couple of days and then into Shiga Prefecture where I will be staying with a host family. I am going to be having a host sister.

Question #1:
What would be a good gift to get for my host sister and for her family?

Question #2:
I've heard some information on giant centipedes and how they are everywhere. How scared should I be? :P

Question #3:
What are some must visit places in Tokyo?

That's all for now I think. o_O
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Old 2007-06-08, 18:02   Link #306
raikage
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Regarding your first question, when I stayed with a host family for a day or so, I got them a picture book of the city I live in.

Nothing too big or fancy or expensive.
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Old 2007-06-08, 18:04   Link #307
EusebioKun
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Originally Posted by gravitation View Post
ooo i plan on going as an exchange student when i finish skool!! ^__^ i really like japan and would love to live there for a while there is this thing called the JETT programme or summin and they deal with things like that im not to sure of their site but ive heard they are good ^_~
why not do it when in school (I'm assumming ur in high school right now)?

Learn the language as much as u can. Will definitely enjoy the time there more I'm sure.
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Old 2007-06-08, 18:55   Link #308
Karma and Effect
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Acutally.. I was suppose to go sometime around.. Now! T_T It was suppose to be for my 16th B-Day but things came up and we went on a cruise not too long ago instead.. But we will for sure go next Spring Break and I can't wait I had to give up getting a car this year for this and a lot of other things xP Where gonna go to like 4 places there I think. Tokyo (Mostly), Okinawa (We might not be able to), Kyoto, And I forgot the other one(s). @_@ There's a guy at this Japanese Steak House called Koko's that is helping us too. ^^


Quote:
Originally Posted by gravitation
ooo i plan on going as an exchange student when i finish skool!! ^__^ i really like japan and would love to live there for a while there is this thing called the JETT programme or summin and they deal with things like that im not to sure of their site but ive heard they are good ^_~

AHH! Dude I know about that! The same guy at Koko's told us about that, I've heard good things too yep

Oh and to answer Shiokaze:
1. Yea I'd get them a book of the city or somethin like Raikage said.

2. LOL! Be equipped with bug spray!! >__< (Wait, will that stop centipedes? )

3. Dunno about in Tokyo, but if you ever get a chance, I think Okinawa would be fun.
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Old 2007-06-10, 01:27   Link #309
TinyRedLeaf
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shiokaze
Question #3:
What are some must visit places in Tokyo?

That's all for now I think. o_O
Everyone has his or her own subjective opinion of what's best, so it's hard to give a good recommendation without telling us about what you like, no?

My suggestions, in no particular order:

1) To get the best cityscape views, go to Roppongi Hills. The observation deck gives you a 360 degree view of all Tokyo. On clear days, you might even see Mt Fuji.

2) Akihabara. If you're posting here, I assume that you're at least a little bit of an otaku? Akihabara is the closest you'd get to otaku heaven.

3) The Imperial Palace. Since you're in Tokyo already, why not?

4) Tsukiji Fish Market. I hear it's going to be moved pretty soon. So catch it while you still can. Fresh sushi at very reasonable prices too.

5) Harajuku, especially Takeshita Street, if it's gothic lolita maid cos-players that you want to see.

6) Shibuya by night, definitely. By day, it's a little boring.

7) If you're of legal age to drink, I highly recommend a trip to the Ebisu Beer Museum. Very cool displays of the vats and distilleries used to brew beer. More importantly --- really really really cheap and good beer for sale!

8) Finally, if you have the time, by all means make the trip to Mitaka (only about 1h train ride from Shinjuku station) to visit the Ghibli Museum. It's impossible to be unhappy just to be there.
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Old 2007-06-11, 14:30   Link #310
Circular Logic
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Question: If you were to pick a city/university to spend a year's exchange in, which one would you pick?

I'm thinking either Tokyo or Sapporo, but some opinions would be nice. :>
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Old 2007-06-13, 23:00   Link #311
Shiokaze
Hitsugaya is my hero.
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karma and Effect View Post
Acutally.. I was suppose to go sometime around.. Now! T_T It was suppose to be for my 16th B-Day but things came up and we went on a cruise not too long ago instead.. But we will for sure go next Spring Break and I can't wait I had to give up getting a car this year for this and a lot of other things xP Where gonna go to like 4 places there I think. Tokyo (Mostly), Okinawa (We might not be able to), Kyoto, And I forgot the other one(s). @_@ There's a guy at this Japanese Steak House called Koko's that is helping us too. ^^




AHH! Dude I know about that! The same guy at Koko's told us about that, I've heard good things too yep

Oh and to answer Shiokaze:
1. Yea I'd get them a book of the city or somethin like Raikage said.

2. LOL! Be equipped with bug spray!! >__< (Wait, will that stop centipedes? )

3. Dunno about in Tokyo, but if you ever get a chance, I think Okinawa would be fun.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
Everyone has his or her own subjective opinion of what's best, so it's hard to give a good recommendation without telling us about what you like, no?

My suggestions, in no particular order:

1) To get the best cityscape views, go to Roppongi Hills. The observation deck gives you a 360 degree view of all Tokyo. On clear days, you might even see Mt Fuji.

2) Akihabara. If you're posting here, I assume that you're at least a little bit of an otaku? Akihabara is the closest you'd get to otaku heaven.

3) The Imperial Palace. Since you're in Tokyo already, why not?

4) Tsukiji Fish Market. I hear it's going to be moved pretty soon. So catch it while you still can. Fresh sushi at very reasonable prices too.

5) Harajuku, especially Takeshita Street, if it's gothic lolita maid cos-players that you want to see.

6) Shibuya by night, definitely. By day, it's a little boring.

7) If you're of legal age to drink, I highly recommend a trip to the Ebisu Beer Museum. Very cool displays of the vats and distilleries used to brew beer. More importantly --- really really really cheap and good beer for sale!

8) Finally, if you have the time, by all means make the trip to Mitaka (only about 1h train ride from Shinjuku station) to visit the Ghibli Museum. It's impossible to be unhappy just to be there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by raikage View Post
Regarding your first question, when I stayed with a host family for a day or so, I got them a picture book of the city I live in.

Nothing too big or fancy or expensive.
Thank you all, and um, do you know the outlet voltage in Japan?
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Old 2007-06-14, 00:08   Link #312
Kyuusai
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shiokaze View Post
Thank you all, and um, do you know the outlet voltage in Japan?
Japan uses 100 volts. Yep, not even 110 like the US, even though their outlets look like ungrounded American outlets. Then it gets REALLY interesting, because Eastern Japan uses 50Hz cycle, while Western japan uses 60Hz cycle.

Fortunately, it probably won't matter! If you're worried about a laptop or some other piece of complex electronics, take a look at its power supply (or the unit itself if it's a plain cord or there's no information printed on the power supply itself). If it were made in the last decade or so, odds are that somewhere in the line where it lists the input it will say 100V-240V and at the end of that line will say 50/60Hz. Yes, most modern electronics support any modern international standard with auto-switching power supplies.

Not everything else is that way, though! Irons (hair or clothes), toaster ovens, hair dryers, etc, are generally not made with the capability to handle different electric standards. If you're coming from the US, you'd only be a drop of 10 volts or 10 Hz, which will probably not harm your equipment, but it doesn't mean it would still work properly, and better safe than sorry, right?

So, the good news is that your equipment will probably work just fine there. Just don't trust anything that doesn't say so explicitly.
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Old 2007-06-14, 23:16   Link #313
Shiokaze
Hitsugaya is my hero.
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyuusai View Post
Japan uses 100 volts. Yep, not even 110 like the US, even though their outlets look like ungrounded American outlets. Then it gets REALLY interesting, because Eastern Japan uses 50Hz cycle, while Western japan uses 60Hz cycle.

Fortunately, it probably won't matter! If you're worried about a laptop or some other piece of complex electronics, take a look at its power supply (or the unit itself if it's a plain cord or there's no information printed on the power supply itself). If it were made in the last decade or so, odds are that somewhere in the line where it lists the input it will say 100V-240V and at the end of that line will say 50/60Hz. Yes, most modern electronics support any modern international standard with auto-switching power supplies.

Not everything else is that way, though! Irons (hair or clothes), toaster ovens, hair dryers, etc, are generally not made with the capability to handle different electric standards. If you're coming from the US, you'd only be a drop of 10 volts or 10 Hz, which will probably not harm your equipment, but it doesn't mean it would still work properly, and better safe than sorry, right?

So, the good news is that your equipment will probably work just fine there. Just don't trust anything that doesn't say so explicitly.
Thanks a bunchies, and I don't know about asking this next question...
well anywho, what is the average adult view on Japanese Anime? Like, if a 20 year old watching Anime compared to say a 10 yeard old.
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Old 2007-06-15, 00:05   Link #314
Kyuusai
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shiokaze View Post
Thanks a bunchies, and I don't know about asking this next question...
well anywho, what is the average adult view on Japanese Anime? Like, if a 20 year old watching Anime compared to say a 10 yeard old.
You're quite welcome, but I'm afraid the answer to the next question isn't as positive...

Imagine what the average American adult would think of a grown man who watches cartoons. ...then add on to that disdain stereotypes of various perversions, violent tendencies, social ineptitude... and just generally being outcast.

Anime fandom among adults is definitely a subculture in Japan. Otaku are becoming more mainstream, but only as a curiosity, not as accepted members of society. The number of people belong to the subculture is very large, but still a minority, and a hush-hush one at that.
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Old 2007-06-15, 02:07   Link #315
Nergol
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Shiko:

1) Booze

2) Not at all

3) The Meiji Shrine, Tokyo Tower, the Shinjuku Governent Office Building (especially if you're a CLAMP fan), Akihabara, Nakano Broadway, Yokohama Chinatown, Odaiba...

Things to remember:

Bring an AM/FM radio and tune it to 810AM in Tokyo. The sake you get from vending machines is pretty good - try it. MOS Burger and Becker's Burger are awesome. Make sure to go to the Becker's that's a left turn out of Akihabara station, across from the hentai cosplay shop. Book Off is your friend. If you can find it in the maze of streets out the east end of Shinjuku Station, have a drink at Dubliners - the best Irish pub in all of Japan. The easiest place to use a foreign debit/ATM card to withdraw money is at the Post Office - Post Offices in Japan have ATMs in them. The ATMs there also have an option for an English menu - a lifesaver. They combine the virtues of being everywhere, and also being basically your only choice to withdraw money from a foreign account. Make sure not to be in a Women Only subway car after 9PM - I don't think JR does that, but the Keio line does.

Tokyo is really hot in July. Keep hydrated.

Have fun.
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Old 2007-06-16, 16:16   Link #316
xxanimefan4_ever
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random question
is wearing a shirt with japanese on it in Japan uncool?
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Old 2007-06-16, 19:07   Link #317
Tommy
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Join Date: May 2003
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxanimefan4_ever View Post
random question
is wearing a shirt with japanese on it in Japan uncool?
I would say yes, but also depends on what the shirt says. I bought a shirt to wear there only because I thought it would grab attention and I only got a couple of responses, but they were good ones.
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Old 2007-06-17, 03:58   Link #318
Shiokaze
Hitsugaya is my hero.
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyuusai View Post
You're quite welcome, but I'm afraid the answer to the next question isn't as positive...

Imagine what the average American adult would think of a grown man who watches cartoons. ...then add on to that disdain stereotypes of various perversions, violent tendencies, social ineptitude... and just generally being outcast.

Anime fandom among adults is definitely a subculture in Japan. Otaku are becoming more mainstream, but only as a curiosity, not as accepted members of society. The number of people belong to the subculture is very large, but still a minority, and a hush-hush one at that.
Thanks again. I kind of thought that was the general response but just wanted to make sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nergol View Post
Shiko:

1) Booze

2) Not at all

3) The Meiji Shrine, Tokyo Tower, the Shinjuku Governent Office Building (especially if you're a CLAMP fan), Akihabara, Nakano Broadway, Yokohama Chinatown, Odaiba...

Things to remember:

Bring an AM/FM radio and tune it to 810AM in Tokyo. The sake you get from vending machines is pretty good - try it. MOS Burger and Becker's Burger are awesome. Make sure to go to the Becker's that's a left turn out of Akihabara station, across from the hentai cosplay shop. Book Off is your friend. If you can find it in the maze of streets out the east end of Shinjuku Station, have a drink at Dubliners - the best Irish pub in all of Japan. The easiest place to use a foreign debit/ATM card to withdraw money is at the Post Office - Post Offices in Japan have ATMs in them. The ATMs there also have an option for an English menu - a lifesaver. They combine the virtues of being everywhere, and also being basically your only choice to withdraw money from a foreign account. Make sure not to be in a Women Only subway car after 9PM - I don't think JR does that, but the Keio line does.

Tokyo is really hot in July. Keep hydrated.

Have fun.
I'm not 20 so I can't drink in Japan. And all the bits of information are helpful.
Soo more questions?

1) Is there some site online I can see what is in Akihabara? Their main site maybe? I might want to buy some thingies and I kind of want a little look before I go? Japanese websites work too.

2) Maybe this is a question for the Japanese Language thread but anyways, do Japanese people feel that words like Computer and Konpuuta are two separate words?

3) What would make a good family gift for my host family? I already got something for each member and thought that getting an overall gift for the family would be nice as well.
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Old 2007-06-17, 05:13   Link #319
Abbott
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Just type "Akihabara" in google and you'll find plenty of sites about it. Here's one of the first hits I got: http://www.akiba.or.jp/english/

Remember, google is useful.

As for "thingies," it depends on what you want. There's a musical instrument district, electronics everywhere, lots of media shops (DVD, CD, Books and Video Games), anime and manga shops, anime and manga merchandise and plenty of porn. It's impossible to NOT find what you want.
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Old 2007-07-08, 21:02   Link #320
hkop
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Going to Japan Tokyo (need japanese friend)

Hey guys im heading over to tokyo for 2 weeks in July 20th, somebody who currently lives in tokyo speaks english and japanese think you can tour us around? im only coming with a friend of mine. 2 people.
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