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View Poll Results: How much Japanese do you know from watching anime?
None 0 0%
A few words 14 21.54%
A few phrases 33 50.77%
I can watch some anime without subtitles 10 15.38%
I can watch most anime without subtitles 5 7.69%
Fluent 3 4.62%
Voters: 65. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 2011-11-05, 01:00   Link #21
risingstar3110
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I think it's like the case about a child was locked and left to watched TV since newly born, and she still can't learn a word. Basically unless you react with what you heard, otherwise it will be hard to actually learn anything.

I am learning Japanese right at this moment, and i only hear from anime what i was taught, because i then actually can react to it. But there are phrase that i didn't understand it first, and as i study them later on, it starts to reappear into my memory. Most are short/informal form through. For examples:
  • the short form "shinpai shinai de"
  • the verb "oboeru"
I especially remember these two, because i heard them before i start to learn its meaning/ how to use them. And it stuck into my head since then
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Last edited by risingstar3110; 2011-11-06 at 09:47.
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Old 2011-11-05, 01:12   Link #22
Masuzu
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I can watch some shows without subtitles, but there's no way I'd be able to keep up a conversation for too long.

In all likeliness I'd try to end it quickly:

"Ahh, gomen, demo kore wa ore no nihongo no genkai desu."

And if anyone asks:

"Suko- iya, to~temo sukoshi nihongo ga wakarimasu."

I can read almost none and from the above you can basically guess how bad I am at it.

Never taken classes or anything like that, which is why.
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Last edited by Masuzu; 2011-11-05 at 01:26.
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Old 2011-11-05, 01:20   Link #23
NoemiChan
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Few and I think informal phrases.
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Old 2011-11-05, 04:20   Link #24
fanty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by risingstar3110 View Post
I think it's like the case about a children was locked and left to watched TV since newly born, and she still can't learn a word. Basically unless you react with what you heard, otherwise it will be hard to actually learn anything.
Nonsense. When I was a little girl I learnt Lithuanian and Russian solely from watching TV. I had absolutely no Lithuanians or Russians to interact with because I lived in a 100% Polish village. And yes, I'm 100% fluent in those two languages.
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Old 2011-11-05, 08:02   Link #25
panpanpanpanmelonpan
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Hello
Goodbye
Please
Thank you
Shut up (who wouldn't after watching Shakugan no Shana? XD)
Cute
Why
What is it
Sorry
Yes
No
Sky
Sea
Land
I/me

That's all I can think of right now. XD Although I knew a few already, and sky, sea and land is because of Kingdom Hearts (for anyone who plays it).

Last edited by panpanpanpanmelonpan; 2011-11-05 at 08:27. Reason: Forgot one
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Old 2011-11-05, 08:22   Link #26
Irenicus
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Originally Posted by Detective-san View Post
"Ahh, gomen, demo kore wa ore no nihongo no genkai desu."
And you'd end up sounding kinda rude, gomen is a casual form of gomennasai; it is better to use sumimasen in such a context anyway though (gomennasai conveys a different apologetic sense). I'm not sure genkai is the best word for trying to convey that you don't wish to talk any more Japanese either ("limit"? On what?); and finally ore is a casual pronoun, rather arrogant if used in a wrong context, and watashi or even boku (*if* you're a young male) is far better.

'osu.

This thread is stupid, frankly -- but I'll add anyway that anime is actually pretty useful in presenting scenarios where you can, if you grasp the character dynamics going on, see how the language is being used in a variety of contexts.

Then you get for example the irony of UmeUme in Ben-To using polite language to ask permission to beat the hell out of Satou, because you recognize how strange that is and therefore it ends up becoming really funny.
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Old 2011-11-05, 08:35   Link #27
Masuzu
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Originally Posted by Irenicus View Post
And you'd end up sounding kinda rude, gomen is a casual form of gomennasai; it is better to use sumimasen in such a context anyway though (gomennasai conveys a different apologetic sense). I'm not sure genkai is the best word for trying to convey that you don't wish to talk any more Japanese either ("limit"? On what?); and finally ore is a casual pronoun, rather arrogant if used in a wrong context, and watashi or even boku (*if* you're a young male) is far better.

'osu.

This thread is stupid, frankly -- but I'll add anyway that anime is actually pretty useful in presenting scenarios where you can, if you grasp the character dynamics going on, see how the language is being used in a variety of contexts.

Then you get for example the irony of UmeUme in Ben-To using polite language to ask permission to beat the hell out of Satou, because you recognize how strange that is and therefore it ends up becoming really funny.
And that's why I'd never even try to strike up a real conversation, you can only learn so much without any real material that's designed to teach you, and I haven't even watched any amount of anime that would be considered a lot, which is why I'd get shot dead in Japan, the flaws in my speech are glaring.
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Old 2011-11-05, 13:01   Link #28
Vexx
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Just to emphsize... yeah, you'd be ostracized pretty quickly in Japan or by native Japanese if you spoke like they do in anime. Seriously - people, take some relatively cheap courses in conversational Japanese at your local community college and you're hundreds of light years ahead in the basics.
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Old 2011-11-05, 22:29   Link #29
Masuzu
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And that friends is because in anime you mostly hear close people talking to each other, if you tried to talk to a stranger that way, well...
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Old 2011-11-06, 09:04   Link #30
KyriaL
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Most people would know at least a few words after watching a few series, but forming phrases and sentences, that takes a longer time to develop, with some help from the internet.

However, what is said in anime should be used as a simple guide and not applied 100% in conversations, as I have read that how the language is spoken there is in some ways quite different from how it is shown in the media.
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Old 2011-11-06, 09:56   Link #31
risingstar3110
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Originally Posted by fanty View Post
Nonsense. When I was a little girl I learnt Lithuanian and Russian solely from watching TV. I had absolutely no Lithuanians or Russians to interact with because I lived in a 100% Polish village. And yes, I'm 100% fluent in those two languages.
Interacting to the language here does not means you have to have someone to talk with through. Reflect over what you heard and especially read through all sorts of textbook/guideline would definitely helps your study. Would be even much easier if you already knows a similar language. However the case of Japanese is much more complex if you try to learn it through anime if you only have English background, since the order of grammar (verb, qualify noun) are opposite to that of English. And there is all short of verb form, short, formal, keigo, ect to make the situation more complex as well
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Old 2011-11-06, 10:21   Link #32
fanty
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Still, I can bet, if your children spent their early years watching anime in Japanese, they would come out of it fluent in the language. They WOULD have dire vocabulary shortages, but that could be very easily remedied by reading.

I remember back when I was four years old, I met a living and breathing Lithuanian for the first time in my life. She stroke up a conversation with me, and it went fine until she mentioned strawberry jam. I had absolutely no idea what "jam" was. I learnt Lithuanian mostly from soap operas, and soap opera characters are not particularly fond of talking about jam.

But once I started reading books in Lithuanian, all holes in my vocabulary were closed.

Three or so years ago I went through the same experience with Russian. When I first started reading Anna Karenina in Russian, it was an agony. I realized just how pedestrian my Russian vocabulary was. The thing was full of book-words I had never encountered before. But by the time I was finishing the book (that's 800 pages later), I had absolutely no problems reading in Russian at all.

Some beautiful day I'll repeat the same experience with Japanese (I'm busy conventionally studying an another language at the moment).

Last edited by fanty; 2011-11-06 at 10:38.
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Old 2011-11-06, 12:01   Link #33
risingstar3110
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I think you are one of the few special case here as you are willing to go out of the way to learn. I knew lots of East Asia countries' kids, who do watch lots of anime with sub during their childhood (Doraemon, Dragon Ball, Sailor Moon and the like). But don't think a lot of them actually managed to pick up words/grammar through
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Old 2011-11-06, 12:21   Link #34
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Originally Posted by Akito_Kinomoto View Post
A few phrases.

Seriously, if you watch enough of anything from any language you're bound to pick up on a few things, but if I wanted to be fluent I'd just take a few classes.
This @ the first sentence, but no @ the second.

Being fluent is actually a combination of the technical knowledge of a language (what you get from classes) and a conversational knowledge (from using it, hearing it, etc. in natural situations, such as watching a film and conversing in the language).

If you don't have the opportunity to speak with someone who is fluent (which should be part of a good language class anyway), a surrogate is consuming some media from that region. It's not the best surrogate, because you're not having to accurately produce the language, but it's better than nothing.

My Spanish started slipping, despite all of my mechanical knowledge of how it works, not because I stopped studying, but because I stopped watching fotonovelas and speaking it with friends/hearing it conversationally on a regular basis.

Now, whenever I speak it, I "sound like a tourist," because all my natural inflection, etc. has gone away, even though what I'm saying is grammatically correct and conveys meaning, it's still mechanical and stiff.
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Old 2011-11-06, 12:28   Link #35
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Let's see... I have many many years of anime viewing... PLUS one mere semester of Japanese (taken 10 years ago).

Watching anime. Helps you know a few phrases; and if you listen long enough, your pronunciation of Japanese should also improve. Granted, whatever language is your native language -- your accent will never go away (when transitioning into the new language).

So far, I still know more German than Japanese; but my vocabulary is weak on both.
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Old 2011-11-06, 23:52   Link #36
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More than you'd expect. I finally started taking Japanese classes in college a couple of months ago and the introductory classes were fairly useless outside of actual writing in Hiragana since I'd already picked up on most of the basic grammar and vocabulary watching anime. Though it was a bit disappointing to realise that in regular Japanese society nobody actually talks like so many anime characters and that you're not supposed to use stuff like "ore" instead of "watashi", or "omae" instead of "anata", or "da" instead of "desu", or "janai" instead of "dewa arimasen", etc.
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Old 2011-11-07, 00:07   Link #37
Masuzu
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My native language helps me a bit regarding pronounceable.

Though the meanings...
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Old 2011-11-08, 12:40   Link #38
risingstar3110
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Originally Posted by Endless Twilight View Post
More than you'd expect. I finally started taking Japanese classes in college a couple of months ago and the introductory classes were fairly useless outside of actual writing in Hiragana since I'd already picked up on most of the basic grammar and vocabulary watching anime. Though it was a bit disappointing to realise that in regular Japanese society nobody actually talks like so many anime characters and that you're not supposed to use stuff like "ore" instead of "watashi", or "omae" instead of "anata", or "da" instead of "desu", or "janai" instead of "dewa arimasen", etc.
Just want to clarify (to others since you probably already know it),it's not like "no one uses it". When you started learning Japanese, the teacher expected that you will need to use it to talk with a stranger (who don't know English or any other language perhaps). That's why they started with the more formal, long form (desu and masu).

The short form in anime is quite a casual way to talk, and can be used to talk with close friends or family (and use for most other types of grammar). So it's not as "for survival" as long form.

Actually they should start with keigo first (for those who don't know, keigo's a really formal style of talking), but it's quite complex
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Old 2011-11-08, 13:03   Link #39
Icy.Tear
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If someone told me gomennasai in English, I'd slap them for ordering me to forgive them.

And I'm more under the impression that keigo is for business etc. I wouldn't speak to a stranger saying: 'Koko ni suwaraseteitadakemasen ka?'

Nor would I: 'Moushi wake gozaimasen' after bumping into someone in the street.

Quote:
"Ahh, gomen, demo kore wa ore no nihongo no genkai desu."
If you don't know Japanese, that was ******* amazing.
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Old 2011-11-08, 13:18   Link #40
Vicious108
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Originally Posted by risingstar3110 View Post
Just want to clarify (to others since you probably already know it),it's not like "no one uses it". When you started learning Japanese, the teacher expected that you will need to use it to talk with a stranger (who don't know English or any other language perhaps). That's why they started with the more formal, long form (desu and masu).

The short form in anime is quite a casual way to talk, and can be used to talk with close friends or family (and use for most other types of grammar). So it's not as "for survival" as long form.

Actually they should start with keigo first (for those who don't know, keigo's a really formal style of talking), but it's quite complex
Well yes my teacher did specify that the short forms of verbs could be used in informal situations, but when I asked him about personal pronouns like "ore" or "omae" he literally said "We don't really use them. Only in manga and anime, haha." But I guess he might be a little out of touch having lived abroad for so long and maybe youngsters use it or something.
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